Janet Leigh
American actress
Janet Leigh
Janet Leigh was an American actress. She was the mother of Kelly Curtis and Jamie Lee Curtis. Discovered by actress Norma Shearer, Leigh secured a contract with MGM and began her film career in 1947. She appeared in several popular films over the following decade, including Little Women (1949), Holiday Affair (1949), Angels in the Outfield (1951), and Living It Up (1954).
Biography
Janet Leigh's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Janet Leigh from around the web
Watch Rihanna Check In As Marion Crane In Chilling 'Bates Motel' Trailer
Huffington Post - 21 days
Somewhere in between blocking Drake’s kiss at the VMAs and eyeing Sandra Bullock’s fries while shooting “Ocean’s Eight,” Rihanna somehow found the time to check into “Bates Motel” for a short and likely murderous stay.  The first trailer featuring the singer for the A&E series’ upcoming fifth season debuted online Tuesday and, unsurprisingly, Rihanna   steals the damn show with just seconds of screen time.  Rihanna joins the final season of the contemporary prequel to Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” as Marion Crane, the iconic role originated by Janet Leigh. Marion might not be around for a long time (shower, scream, drain, remember?), but that doesn’t mean it won’t be a good time.  Released exclusively on Entertainment Weekly, the trailer shows Rihanna’s character arriving amid a rainstorm ― just like in the original movie ― and meeting neighborhood psycho, Norman Bates, at the check-in desk of the infamous motel.  “It’s this collision of ‘Bates Motel’ storytelling ...
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This is Jamie: Actress, Activist, and Beloved Children's Book Author
Huffington Post - 5 months
Jamie Lee Curtis has a knack for simplifying complex topics, such as adoption and human emotion, and interpreting them in a way children can easily understand when reading her books. Her latest title, This Is Me: A Story of Who We Are & Where We Came From (Workman Publishing) is about emigration, immigration, and the idea of leaving the old behind for the promise of the new. It's a celebration of diversity and self, helping young children to begin the process of discovering what makes them unique and what connects all of us together. "This book is an exploration of adventure," says Curtis. "It's about the possibility of a new life, which is what our country was built upon." Curtis was born in 1958 to movie stars Janet Leigh and Tony Curtis. "Reading books was not a family activity," she says. "I don't have any memory of my family making reading a priority." Nonetheless, Curtis recalls a few favorite childhood books, including Go, Dog. Go! by P.D. Eastman. "After the big dog part ...
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Kendall Jenner Gives Her Best 'Psycho' Scream In Love Magazine's Blooper Reel
Huffington Post - about 1 year
All December long, Love Magazine rolled out some truly unusual content for their annual advent calendar, so it only makes sense that they had some fun behind-the-scenes clips, as well.  In case you forgot, Rita Ora channeled "Mean Girls," Kris Jenner took a dive to "Trap Queen" and Kendall Jenner made you some feel some sorta way about hammerhead sharks.  The almost six-minute blooper reel gives you a peek at what it takes to create the highly stylized debauchery. Highlights? Christina Milian falling on an inflatable donut, Zendaya's ab workout and Kendall channeling Janet Leigh's signature "Psycho" scream.  Laugh it up and watch the full video above.  Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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Kendall Jenner Gives Her Best 'Psycho' Scream In Love Magazine's Blooper Reel
Huffington Post - about 1 year
All December long, Love Magazine rolled out some truly unusual content for their annual advent calendar, so it only makes sense that they had some fun behind-the-scenes clips, as well.  In case you forgot, Rita Ora channeled "Mean Girls," Kris Jenner took a dive to "Trap Queen" and Kendall Jenner made you some feel some sorta way about hammerhead sharks.  The almost six-minute blooper reel gives you a peek at what it takes to create the highly stylized debauchery. Highlights? Christina Milian falling on an inflatable donut, Zendaya's ab workout and Kendall channeling Janet Leigh's signature "Psycho" scream.  Laugh it up and watch the full video above.  Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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Huffington Post article
'Hitchcock/Truffaut'
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Kent Jones' Hitchcock/Truffaut, currently playing at Film Forum, is a rare bird, a film based upon an iconic book which memorialized the extensive conversation between two great filmmakers. Truffaut had only made three films when he sought out Hitchcock in l962. Visiting Hitchcock for the young filmmaker championing the Nouvelle Vague and the auteur theory of cinema was like a pilgrim traveling to mecca. As such the film has a degree of separation from the films since it relates to them by way of the written word. Along the way David Fincher, Paul Schrader, Peter Bogdanovich, Richard Linklater and Wes Anderson make cameo appearances to discuss both book and film. But the real star of the show is Martin Scorsese and the subject that takes up most of the celluloid are arguably Hitchcock's two greatest masterpieces Psycho (1960) and Vertigo (1958). Scorsese is particularly brilliant describing Psycho and the placement of the steering wheel within the frame of the shot in which Janet Leigh ...
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Huffington Post article
CultureZohn: <i>Hitchcock/Truffaut</i>: A Cinematic Love Affair
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Hitchcock and Truffaut meeting at Universal Studios, photo by Philippe Halsman In this day and age of digi-communication, it is very easy to access libraries and materials, printed and video, that help us understand the great creative minds of the past. What is much less common is the possibility of hearing directly from the artists themselves, especially in conversation with each other. Truffaut and Hitchcock by Philippe Halsman In 1962, Francois Truffaut was just 30 and not afraid to admit that he still had much to learn though he had been a film historian and critic and his first three films were already considered masterpieces of a new, more spontaneous style of filmmaking. As with fellow French filmmakers Jean Luc Godard and Louis Malle, he studied forgotten American films as well as international ones for what they could impart. He took it upon himself to resurrect the artistic contributions of one of his heroes, Alfred Hitchcock, whom he had met when he was s ...
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Psycho in Paris
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Will terror finally wake us up from our sleep? Remember "Macbeth has murdered sleep?" You may have been in a crowd of people who gathered around someone's iPhone when news of the Paris massacres started to be reported late on Friday afternoon and you undoubtedly noted a variety of responses. Some people who can't deal with the fear, go into a kind of shock which is like anesthesia. They're unable to feel anything about it. Others distance themselves with black humor and sick jokes and others fall into a state of uncontrollable anxiety in which literally all of human life appears lethal. Riots and stampedes in soccer, stadiums, the Chilean mine disaster, the fall of the Twin Towers, all blend into one horrifying nightmare become reality. It might not have been helped if that self-same person were listening to the BBC coverage which pre-empted WNYC regularly scheduled programming and gave a blow by blow of the individual executions at the Bataclan. Nor were they helped by those commenta ...
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Jerry Stahl With the Skinny on Fatty, Republican Sun Gods, and Happy Mutant Babies
Huffington Post - about 3 years
I first met Jerry Stahl at the Los Angeles Book Fair, back when it was held at UCLA in Westwood, the second happiest place on earth. It was blazing hot, and Jerry was sitting in a booth trying to promote his book, squirming like a bug under a microscope as all the happy peppy people passed by. He looked like something out of a Kafka novel written by William Burroughs, a writer about to be transformed into a junky cockroach. Which is basically how I felt, having been in a booth trying to promote my own book next to Hollywood legend Janet Leigh, who was signing her new memoir, and had a line of adoring fans snaking around the block. While I sat there sweating like an amateur smuggler being interrogated at customs while a hundred bags of junk clogs his colon. Jerry is one of those rare writers who goes between Hollywood screenplays and novels. He writes dark subversive stories and he somehow continues to get away with it. I should, for the sake of full disclosure, admit that he ...
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Fashion Kills!
Huffington Post - about 3 years
"I can afford a blemish on my character, but not on my clothes," says Shelby Carpenter, played by Vincent Price in Laura, Otto Preminger's 1944 film. When actors are questioned about the process of getting into character they invariably cite that the right pair of shoes or gloves, a strict corset or a comfy cardigan will help them shape and inhabit their fictional persona far greater than any notes from the director. In Dressing Dangerously: Dysfunctional Fashion in Film, a new book by Jonathan Faiers, the author explores this knife-edge relationship between fashion and film, and documents the tiny sartorial details that can tailor the narrative as much as the script. Faiers' own narrative covers and uncovers every area of the screen wardrobe. There is the iconic trench coat as worn by Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffanys, the symbolic red dress that brands Bette Davis a 'scarlet woman' in Jezebel, the 'wages of sin' fur coat coveted by Doris Day ...
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Celebrate the Holidays at the Bush Library and Museum
Yahoo News - over 3 years
Modeled after the annual White House tree lighting ceremony that takes place annually on the White House grounds, the ceremony will include musical entertainment, a celebrity guest tree lighter and a public reception. This free event takes place in front of the museum's magnificently decorated 19-foot Christmas tree in the rotunda, and live entertainment and Santa's workshop will get you in the yuletide spirit. (1949, 87 minutes, Black and White) Directed by Don Hartman. Janet Leigh stars as Connie Ennis, a young widowed mother who has an unfortunate first encounter with department store clerk Steve Mason (Robert Mitchum), inadvertently causing him to get fired just before Christmas.
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Yahoo News article
Janet Leigh's onetime home is listed at $8 million
LATimes - over 3 years
Janet Leigh’s shower is for sale. No, not the one in which the actress was killed in “Psycho,” but the one in her former home in Beverly Crest.
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LATimes article
Scott Bridges: How to Spend a Week in Arizona, Part II: Scottsdale
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Boasting a vibrant art scene is the city the New York Times called "a desert version of Miami's South Beach," adding that it is one of the "hippest and happening" places in the country. And you won't find a better Mid-Century architecture community than this outside of Palm Springs. Scottsdale, once voted "America's Most Livable City," is essentially, as Slant3 pointed out in the comments of Part I of this article, a suburb within Greater Phoenix (and to be fair, Tucson probably does deserve its own segment - and I'll highlight one feature below). Desert sunset. (Photo courtesy of Scottsdale Convention &amp; Visitors Bureau) But Scottsdale has a distinct character all its own. The resort town is renowned for its first-class spas, and is practically synonymous with golf. In fact, tourism is the primary economic engine, with only New York and Las Vegas having more AAA Five-Diamond resorts. What to Do Fashion plays a prominent role in Scottsdale, and downtown ...
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Huffington Post article
James Franco Goes 'Psycho'
Huffington Post - over 3 years
James Franco is going 'Psycho' for his most recent art exhibit, on view at London's Pace Gallery this week. For the cinematic-inspired show, the actor performs his best Janet Leigh impersonations in a lofty reimagination of Alfred Hitchcock's epic 1960 film. That's right, the ever-reaching Franco dons a blonde wig and screams his lungs out in a shower, all in an effort to recreate the disturbing terror magic of a Hollywood relic. "Psycho Nacirema," the official title of Franco's homage to Hitchcock, is a large-scale video installation that functions as a full-on mise-en-scène of the original "Psycho." Created with Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (someone who seems all too eager to produce multiple projects centered on Norman Bates), the work references a real-life murder as well, intertwining plot points from the investigation of suspected killer Fatty Arbuckle. Arbuckle was the first actor to receive a $1 million pay check, but in 1921 he received a heavy dose of u ...
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Huffington Post article
George Heymont: Guns 'n Poses
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Those who work in the mental health field know that the auditory hallucinations suffered by their psychiatric patients seem dangerously real. Whether the voices inside their heads are telling them to kill their children, their spouses, or their president, these patients often see themselves as the mechanical means to a tragic end. Whether politically motivated or killing people because "God told me they have to die," such murderers are sorely misguided. It's easy to label them as a threat to themselves and a danger to society, but stop for a minute to think about the society in which we live. Some people fear a zombie uprising while others are actively "preparing" for a post-apocalyptic crisis. Based on the popular 1959 novel by Richard Condon, 1962's Cold War thriller The Manchurian Candidate starred Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, John Houseman, Angela Lansbury, and Janet Leigh. Although only three years older than the actor who played her son in John Frankenhei ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Janet Leigh
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2004
    Age 76
    Leigh died at her home on October 3, 2004, at the age of 77 after suffering a heart attack.
    More Details Hide Details She suffered from vasculitis and peripheral neuropathy, which caused her right hand to become gangrenous. She was cremated after death and her ashes are interred in a niche in Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, California.
    Leigh was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, on May 14, 2004.
    More Details Hide Details Leigh was a Democrat and appeared alongside Tony Curtis at the 1960 Democratic National Convention.
    They remained married for 42 years until her death in 2004.
    More Details Hide Details She served on the board of directors of the Motion Picture and Television Foundation, a medical-services provider for actors.
  • 1996
    Age 68
    In 1996, she published her first novel, House of Destiny, which explored the lives of two friends who forged an empire that would change the course of Hollywood’s history.
    More Details Hide Details The book's success spawned a follow-up novel, The Dream Factory (2002), which was set in Hollywood during the height of the studio system.
  • 1995
    Age 67
    In 1995, she published the non-fiction book Psycho: Behind the Scenes of the Classic Thriller.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1973
    Age 45
    In 1973, she appeared in the episode "Beginner's Luck" of the romantic anthology series Love Story.
    More Details Hide Details Leigh appeared in two horror films with her daughter, Jamie Lee Curtis, playing a major role in The Fog (1980), and making a brief cameo appearance in Halloween H20: 20 Years Later (1998). Leigh is also the author of four books. Her first, the memoir There Really Was a Hollywood (1984), became a New York Times bestseller.
  • 1970
    Age 42
    She also appeared in the title role in the 1970 episode "Jenny" of The Virginian, the Murder, She Wrote 1987 episode, "Doom with a View", as "Barbara LeMay" in an episode of The Twilight Zone in 1989 and the Touched by an Angel episode, "Charade", in 1997.
    More Details Hide Details She guest-starred twice as different characters on both Fantasy Island and The Love Boat.
    She also starred in several made-for-TV films, most notably the off-length (135 minutes instead of the usual 100) The House on Greenapple Road, which premiered on ABC in January 1970 to high ratings.
    More Details Hide Details In 1975, Leigh played a retired Hollywood song and dance star opposite Peter Falk and John Payne in the Columbo episode Forgotten Lady. The episode utilizes footage of Leigh from the film Walking My Baby Back Home (1953). Her many guest appearances on TV series include The Man From U.N.C.L.E. two-part episode, "The Concrete Overcoat Affair", in which she played a sadistic Thrush agent named Miss Dyketon, a highly provocative part for mainstream TV at the time. The two-part episode was released in Europe as a feature film in 1967, entitled The Spy in the Green Hat.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1967
    Age 39
    Leigh worked primarily in television from 1967 onward.
    More Details Hide Details Her initial TV appearances were on anthology programs such as Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre and The Red Skelton Hour, and later, Tales of the Unexpected. She hosted The Hollywood Palace variety program of Nov. 27, 1965 and sang and danced on The Dean Martin Show episode of Oct. 5, 1967.
  • 1966
    Age 38
    She did portray Paul Newman's estranged wife in the 1966 private-detective story, Harper.
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  • 1962
    Age 34
    On September 15, 1962, Leigh married stockbroker Robert Brandt.
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  • 1958
    Age 30
    In 1958, Leigh starred as Susan Vargas in the Orson Welles film noir classic Touch of Evil (1958) with Charlton Heston, a film with numerous similarities to Alfred Hitchcock's later film Psycho, which was produced two years after Touch of Evil.
    More Details Hide Details Her most famous performance was as Marion Crane in the Alfred Hitchcock film Psycho (1960). The fact that the star died early in the movie violated narrative conventions of the time. She received a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Leigh was so traumatized by the film's iconic shower scene that she went to great lengths to avoid showers for the rest of her life. Leigh had starring roles in many other films, including the stark drama The Manchurian Candidate (1962) with Frank Sinatra, and the musical comedy Bye Bye Birdie (1963) based on the hit Broadway show. Following those two films, Leigh scaled back her acting work and turned down several roles, including the role of Simone Clouseau in The Pink Panther, because she didn't want to go off on location and away from her family.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1956
    Age 28
    Her initial roles were ingenues based on characters from historical literature, for example in Scaramouche opposite Stewart Granger. By 1956, she moved to more complex roles, such as the role of Linda Latham in Safari opposite Victor Mature.
    More Details Hide Details She co-starred with third husband Tony Curtis in five films, Houdini (1953), The Black Shield of Falworth (1954), The Vikings (1958), The Perfect Furlough (1958), and Who Was That Lady? (1960). They also had cameos together in a sixth film, Pepe (1960).
  • 1955
    Age 27
    In 1955, Leigh played the title role in the musical comedy My Sister Eileen, co-starring Jack Lemmon, Betty Garrett and Dick York.
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  • 1951
    Age 23
    Leigh married her third husband, Tony Curtis, on June 4, 1951.
    More Details Hide Details They had two children, Kelly and Jamie Lee, who both subsequently became actresses. Curtis had divorce papers served to Leigh on the set of The Manchurian Candidate. The couple announced their separation to the press in March 1962. Though it was widely reported that Curtis left Leigh for his Taras Bulba co-star and future wife, Christine Kaufmann, Curtis later stated that their marriage had effectively ended a year earlier.
    She proved versatile, starring in films as diverse as the baseball farce Angels in the Outfield in 1951 and the tense western The Naked Spur in 1953.
    More Details Hide Details The following year, she had a supporting role in the Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis comedy Living It Up, later starring with Jerry Lewis once more in Three On a Couch.
    After two brief marriages as a teenager, Leigh married actor Tony Curtis in 1951, and they had two children together, Jamie Lee Curtis and Kelly Curtis.
    More Details Hide Details During their high-profile marriage, the couple starred in five films together: Houdini (1953), The Black Shield of Falworth (1954), The Vikings (1958), The Perfect Furlough (1958), and Who Was That Lady? (1960). They also had a scene together in another film, the musical comedy Pepe (1960). Leigh played mostly dramatic roles during the latter half of the 1950s in films such as Safari (1955) and Touch of Evil (1958). She continued to appear occasionally in films and television, including The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and Bye Bye Birdie (1963), as well as two films with her daughter, Jamie Lee Curtis: The Fog (1980) and Halloween H20: 20 Years Later (1998).
  • 1949
    Age 21
    In October 1949, Leigh began filming the Cold War action film Jet Pilot with John Wayne.
    More Details Hide Details The film had a notoriously troubled production, with several directorial changes and a filming schedule that dragged on until May 1953. Its release was then delayed another four years due to the extensive (and obsessive) re-editing process by producer Howard Hughes, before finally hitting theaters in 1957. Throughout the 1950s, Leigh tackled a wide variety of film genres.
  • 1948
    Age 20
    In late 1948, Leigh was hailed the "No. 1 glamour girl" of Hollywood, although known for her polite, generous and down-to-earth persona. Many movies followed, notably the 1949 box-office hits Little Women, based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott, and Holiday Affair with Robert Mitchum.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1947
    Age 19
    By late 1947, Leigh was occupied with the shooting of the Lassie film Hills of Home (1948), the first film in which she received star billing.
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    Another film that Leigh was set to star in, before being replaced, was Alias a Gentleman, in which she was cast in April 1947.
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    Furthermore, due to the box office success of The Romance of Rosy Ridge, Leigh and Johnson were teamed up again in a film project called The Life of Monty Stratton in August 1947.
    More Details Hide Details The project was eventually shelved and released in 1949 as The Stratton Story, starring James Stewart and June Allyson.
    Immediately after the film's release, Leigh was cast opposite Walter Pidgeon and Deborah Kerr in If Winter Comes (1947) in the summer of 1947.
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    Leigh initially left college for a film career, but enrolled in night school at the University of Southern California in 1947.
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    Leigh made her film debut in the big budget film The Romance of Rosy Ridge in 1947, as the romantic interest of Van Johnson's character.
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    Discovered by actress Norma Shearer, Leigh secured a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and made her film debut with a starring role in The Romance of Rosy Ridge in 1947.
    More Details Hide Details Over the following years, she appeared in several popular films of a wide variety of genres, including Act of Violence (1948), Little Women (1949), Holiday Affair (1949), Angels in the Outfield (1951), Scaramouche (1952), The Naked Spur (1953), Walking My Baby Back Home (1953), and Living It Up (1954).
  • 1946
    Age 18
    She got the role when performing Phyllis Thaxter's long speech in Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) for the head of the studio talent department in 1946.
    More Details Hide Details During the shooting, Leigh's name was first changed to "Jeanette Reames", then to "Janet Leigh" and finally back to her birth name "Jeanette Morrison", because "Janet Leigh" resembled Vivien Leigh too much. However, Johnson did not like the name and it was finally changed back to "Janet Leigh".
    Prior to beginning her movie career, Leigh was a guest star on the radio dramatic anthology The Cresta Blanca Hollywood Players. Her initial appearance on radio at age 19 was in the program's production "All Through the House," December 24, 1946.
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  • 1945
    Age 17
    Her second marriage was to Stanley Reames, whom she wed on October 5, 1945. They separated in 1948 and divorced on September 7, 1949.
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    In winter 1945, she was discovered by actress Norma Shearer, whose late husband Irving Thalberg had been a senior executive at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
    More Details Hide Details Shearer showed talent agent Lew Wasserman a photograph she had seen of Leigh while vacationing at Sugar Bowl, the ski resort where the girl's parents worked. Shearer later recalled that "that smile made it the most fascinating face I had seen in years. I felt I had to show that face to somebody at the studio." Leigh left the College of the Pacific, where she was studying Music and Psychology, after Wasserman secured a contract with MGM, despite having no acting experience. She was placed under the tutelage of drama coach Lillian Burns.
  • 1942
    Age 14
    At the age of 15 (pretending to be 18) Leigh married 18-year-old John Kenneth Carlisle in Reno, Nevada, on August 1, 1942. The marriage was annulled four months later, on December 28, 1942.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1927
    Born
    Born on July 6, 1927.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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