Janice Rule
Actress
Janice Rule
Mary Janice Rule was an American actress "at her most convincing playing embittered, neurotic socialites".
Biography
Janice Rule's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Janice Rule from around the web
Lunch with a Legend: Bruce Dern
Huffington Post - over 3 years
After a best actor award at this year's Cannes Film Festival, there's no stopping Bruce Dern. As Woody in Alexander Payne's masterpiece "Nebraska," featured in Toronto, New York, and the Hamptons Film Festivals, he's a doddering but endearing old fool who takes seriously one of those announcements that he's a sweepstakes winner, and convinces his son to drive him from Billings to Omaha to pick up his millions. With old school modesty, Dern says that the obstacle to making this film which took a long time--he received the script 10 years ago this week--was not about casting him, a quasi-bankable character actor in the lead role, but that it's shot in black and white. At lunch at Il Gattopardo this week, he applauded Paramount for letting Payne make his film the way he wanted to make it. And now, there's no question that Dern will join a line-up that includes Robert Redford for "All is Lost," contenders for the Best Actor Oscar. A fount of film history, with stories galore, Dern will te ...
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Huffington Post article
The Unexpected Find That Brought These Long Lost Loves Back Together
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Fathers don't always know best, but in the case of recently married long lost loves Janice Rude and Prentiss Willson, mothers might have. Fifty years ago, Janice Rude was a sophomore and Prentiss Willson a freshman at Occidental College in Los Angeles. "I believe we were simply meant to be," said Willson. "I even remember the first time I laid eyes on Janice." Rude was working the breakfast shift at the school cafeteria and Willson was the first in line, "every day, at 6 a.m., because I just wanted to see her and have our little morning exchange." "I actually didn't think I had a chance with her," he added. "She was a year ahead of me and just so beautiful." But she surprised him. When he didn't show up for the college's pre-Thanksgiving dinner, she sent another student out looking for him. She found out where his family lived and drove 150 miles to Santa Maria on Thanksgiving day to knock on his door. Willson recalled how his mother, while startled at first ...
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Huffington Post article
James Stewart's early roles featured Aug 13 on TCM's Summer Under The Stars - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Stewart plays a book publisher named Shep Henderson who's engaged to a woman he's not totally in love with (Janice Rule). Enter neighbor Gillian Holroyd (Novak), who turns out to be a modern-day witch. Her eye on Shep, combined with a frenemy history
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Google News article
Wilmington on DVD: Kiss Me Deadly, If I Want to Whistle, I Whistle, Sucker Punch - Isthmus Daily Page
Google News - over 5 years
He starred in William Inge's Picnic (in William Holden's movie role, in a stage cast that included Janice Rule, Kim Stanley, Paul Newman, understudy Joanne Woodward, Eileen Heckart and Arthur O'Connell). He made an Anthony Mann-Jimmy Stewart Western
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Google News article
'Johnny Mnemonic', una opción futurista para el fin de semana - ABC.es
Google News - almost 6 years
Intérpretes: Yul Brynner, Janice Rule, George Segal, Clifford David, Pat Hingle. EEUU. 92 min. Oeste.CALIFICACIÓN: ** A las 17.15 horas, 'Espartaco y los diez gladiadores'. Entretenido 'peplum', género de singular éxito en la década de los sesenta,
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Google News article
Hollywood: A Love Story - The Atlantic
Google News - almost 6 years
Why is there nothing in you about Janice Rule? Admittedly, in The Chase, she was only a supporting actress, but as the leading lady in that wonderful lost Western Invitation to a Gunfighter, she was so graceful she drove Yul Brynner to extremes of
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Google News article
Farley Granger, Screen Idol and Stage Actor, Dies at 85
NYTimes - almost 6 years
Farley Granger, who found quick stardom in films like Alfred Hitchcock's ''Strangers on a Train'' in the 1940s and '50s but who then turned aside from Hollywood to pursue stage and television roles, died on Sunday at his home in Manhattan. He was 85. A spokeswoman for the New York City medical examiner's office said he died of natural causes. Mr.
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NYTimes article
FILM; Some Are Great and Some Are Slight, but All Are From a Master
NYTimes - over 10 years
Norman Mailer once observed that to appreciate a writer fully, you must risk liking him at his worst. Something similar is probably true for all great artists, who deserve admiration not only for their great achievements, but also for their misfires, their half-successes, their follies and their curiosity. The death of Robert Altman earlier this
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NYTimes article
MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - over 12 years
LITTLE Ingemar Johansson (not the prizefighter) figures his life could be worse. He could be poor Laika, the unsuspecting dog the Soviets sent into outer space to die. In Lasse Hallstrom's sweet, sensitive comedy MY LIFE AS A DOG (1985), set in 1950's Sweden, Ingemar (Anton Glanzelius) is sent away to the country because his mother is dying of
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NYTimes article
FILM/DVD; '3 Women' Coming of Age at 27
NYTimes - almost 13 years
MANY moviegoers who saw Robert Altman's ''3 Women'' when it was first released in 1977 have remembered it all this time as both cryptic and eloquent, a hypnotic, spookily beautiful reverie. Indeed, the movie's inspiration was a dream, Mr. Altman explained recently, speaking by telephone from Los Angeles; it came on the night he had taken his wife,
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NYTimes article
NEW DVD'S; Ships as Co-Stars in a Seafaring War
NYTimes - almost 13 years
When adapting a good book, don't be too respectful, Peter Weir says on a disc of extras accompanying his ''Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World,'' released today by Fox. ''If you have too much respect for it, you can trip yourself up and create a kind of fetish out of it, an altar, but it's not much good to the audience.'' In one of
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NYTimes article
Janice Rule, 72, Film Actress Who Became a Psychoanalyst
NYTimes - over 13 years
Janice Rule, an actress in film and onstage who became a psychoanalyst late in her career, died on Friday at her home in Manhattan. She was 72. Born in Norwood, Ohio, Ms. Rule studied ballet and began dancing in Chicago nightclubs in her teens. She soon attracted attention in Hollywood and made her film debut in 1951 in ''Goodbye, My Fancy,'' with
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NYTimes article
WATCHING MOVIES WITH/Sissy Spacek; In the Arms Of Memory
NYTimes - about 15 years
SISSY SPACEK remembers wandering down to the drug store in Quitman, the small East Texas town where she grew up, and picking out an empty cigar box that she could use to hide her treasures. ''I think I had a couple of school pictures of secret boyfriends, stuff like that,'' Ms. Spacek said. ''I took it out in the back yard and buried it, but I used
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NYTimes article
SUNDAY VIEW; Arthur Miller Still Holds to His Moral Vision
NYTimes - almost 23 years
TIME HASN'T HAD A STOP, BUT it's doing a graceful pause at the Booth Theater, where "Broken Glass," Arthur Miller's small, intense, deceptively prosy new drama, has set up shop. It was just a half-century ago that Mr. Miller made his Broadway debut with "The Man Who Had All the Luck," which closed after four performances, to begin a career that in
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NYTimes article
THEATER; Inge's Vintage 'Picnic' Gets Long Warf Revival
NYTimes - almost 26 years
IN the theater of the 1950's, William Inge was a critically and commercially successful playwright, but his fame and importance evanesced by the end of the decade. Even though he went on writing plays, as well as short stories and novels, only the screenplay for "Splendor in the Grass," a 1961 Oscar winner with Natalie Wood and Warren Beatty, made
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NYTimes article
Rod Serling's Hometown Likes to Bask in His 'Twilight'
NYTimes - about 28 years
LEAD: You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. Next stop, the town where Rod Serling grew up. You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. Next stop, the town where Rod Serling grew up. Disguised as ''Homewood'' in one of the first ''Twilight
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Janice Rule
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2003
    Age 71
    She practiced in New York and Los Angeles and continued to act occasionally until her death from a cerebral hemorrhage in 2003.
    More Details Hide Details She was survived by her daughters, Kate Thom Fitzgerald and Elizabeth Gazzara, both of Brooklyn; her sisters, Kathleen Rule, of Oceano, California; Ann Nader, of San Marcos, California; and Emily Forbes, of Las Cruces, New Mexico; and her brother, Ralph, of Mallorca, Spain.
  • FORTIES
  • 1973
    Age 41
    She began her formal studies in 1973, specializing in treating her fellow actors, and received her Ph.D ten years later from the Southern California Psychoanalytic Institute in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1956
    Age 24
    Rule had a brief engagement to Farley Granger in 1956.
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  • 1955
    Age 23
    They had appeared in the Broadway play The Carefree Tree in 1955.
    More Details Hide Details Next followed a relationship with Ralph Meeker; Meeker had played Hal in Picnic. Rule married and divorced on three occasions, her former husbands being N. Richard Nash, Robert Thom, and Ben Gazzara. During the 1960s she became interested in psychoanalysis.
  • 1953
    Age 21
    Rule was in the original 1953 Broadway cast of William Inge's Picnic (in the role of Madge Owens, the innocent beauty, played by Kim Novak in the film version) whose company also included Paul Newman who was making his debut on Broadway.
    More Details Hide Details This commitment led her to turn down the role ultimately played by Eva Marie Saint in On the Waterfront (1954). "I knew I couldn't shoot in a movie all day and work on a stage at night and do my best in both," she was quoted as saying by Hedda Hopper of the Los Angeles Times in 1966. Among her other Broadway shows were The Flowering Peach, The Happiest Girl in the World and Michael V. Gazzo's Night Circus, a 1958 production which lasted for only a week, but introduced Rule to Ben Gazzara, who became her third husband. Her other films in the 1950s included A Woman's Devotion (1956), the Western Gun for a Coward (1957) and Bell, Book and Candle (1958), in which she played the fiancée who loses publisher 'Shep' Henderson (James Stewart) to the spell-casting witch Gillian Holroyd (Kim Novak). On television she appeared in the Checkmate episode "The Mask of Vengeance" (1960), where she played Elena Nardos, the roommate of Cloris Leachman's character, Marilyn Parker. She was also in The Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare as a Child." She appeared as different characters in three episodes of Route 66. She acted as both Barbara Webb and Barbara Wells opposite David Janssen in two episodes of The Fugitive entitled "Wife Killer" and "The Walls of Night". She also had a major role as Nancy Reade in "Three Bells to Perdido", the first episode of Have Gun – Will Travel.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1951
    Age 19
    She was pictured on the cover of Life magazine of January 8, 1951, as being someone to watch in the entertainment industry.
    More Details Hide Details Given a contract by Warner Bros., her first credited screen role was as Virginia in Goodbye, My Fancy (1951), which featured Joan Crawford in the lead. The established star though, belittled the younger woman, making her work on the film difficult, although it should be noted that Joan Crawford years later wrote a letter of apology to Ms. Rule for treating her badly on this film. Rule's Warner contract was allowed to lapse after only two films. She was troubled by the attitude toward women's beauty at the studios in the early 1950s: "Because I was afraid of being robbed of my individuality, I fought with the makeup people, the hairdressers, and I didn't understand problems of the publicity department," she was reported as saying in 1957.
  • 1949
    Age 17
    She began dancing at the Chez Paree nightclub at fifteen, which paid for ballet lessons, and was a dancer in the 1949 Broadway production of Miss Liberty.
    More Details Hide Details Rule also studied acting at the Chicago Professional School.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1931
    Born
    Born on August 15, 1931.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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