Jason Robards
American actor
Jason Robards
Jason Nelson Robards, Jr. was an American actor on stage, and in film and television. He is a winner of the Tony Award, two Academy Awards and the Emmy Award. He was also a United States Navy combat veteran of World War II. He became famous playing works of Eugene O'Neill, an American playwright, and regularly performed in O'Neill's works throughout his career. Robards was cast in both common-man roles and as well-known historical figures.
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Robert Vaughn, 'The Man From U.N.C.L.E.' Star, Dead At 83
Huffington Post - 4 months
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83. Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast. The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons. It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum. Vaughn also guested as Napoleon Solo on sitcom “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies” and made an uncred ...
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Huffington Post article
The 50-Year Mission: The Complete, Uncensored, Unauthorized Oral History Of 'Star Trek'
Huffington Post - 6 months
By Edward Gross and Mark A. Altman     WHAT A LONG STRANGE TREK IT'S BEEN   HOLLYWOOD IS THE ONLY BUSINESS WHERE YOU GET TO SHAKE HANDS WITH YOUR DREAMS —writer/director NICHOLAS MEYER Sitting across from me at a small table in a cluttered room in a Miami cemetery was the bearded rabbi with a small yarmulke resting atop his mop of thick gray hair, who was about to conduct my grandmother Edna's graveside funeral. As we all sat around in a melancholy haze as the fateful time approached to bury Edna, I'll never forget the words he shared with me when he found out what I did for a living at the time. "I love Star Trek," he stammered excitedly. "You know why I think that show is so significant? Every story had a moral; it was a parable for the same ethical issues we grapple with in religion every day. I think it's a very meaningful and important show. The original, at least. The others were crap." Now, I wouldn't necessarily say "amen" to that (although admittedly some of the s ...
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Huffington Post article
So Little Time, So Many Possibilities
Huffington Post - about 1 year
A brilliant idea. That's what most creatives crave. For some, great ideas come naturally. For others, they arrive on a cloud of fortuitous timing, often resting on a foundation of intuition and introspection. Once a brilliant idea is within an artist's grasp, the next question is what to do with it. Should a creative person take it in one direction? Two directions? Three or four or more? Should an artist present a brilliant idea to trusted collaborators who can join in on bringing it to fruition? Or should an individual recognize that a seemingly brilliant idea might be more than s/he can handle? These are important questions to ask. While many in the arts stress that one learns the most through one's failures, two recent artistic mishaps drew lots of attention. Produced by the African Community Theatre under Kent State University's Department of Pan-African Studies, a recent production of The Mountaintop (a controversial play by Katori Hall) featured two actors alte ...
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Huffington Post article
Maximilian Schell Dead: Oscar-Winning Actor Dies At 83
Huffington Post - about 3 years
VIENNA (AP) — Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell, a fugitive from Adolf Hitler who became a Hollywood favorite and won an Oscar for his role as a defense attorney in "Judgment at Nuremberg," has died. He was 83. Schell's agent, Patricia Baumbauer, said Saturday he died overnight at a hospital in Innsbruck following a "sudden and serious illness," the Austria Press Agency reported. It was only his second Hollywood role, as defense attorney Hans Rolfe in Stanley Kramer's classic "Judgment at Nuremberg," that earned him wide international acclaim. Schell's impassioned but unsuccessful defense of four Nazi judges on trial for sentencing innocent victims to death won him the 1961 Academy Award for best actor. Schell had first played Rolfe in a 1959 episode of the television program "Playhouse 90." Despite being type-cast for numerous Nazi-era films, Schell's acting performances in the mid-1970s also won him renewed popular acclaim, earning him a best actor Oscar nomination for "The Ma ...
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Huffington Post article
Aisle View: McKellen and Stewart Play Beckett and Pinter
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Samuel Beckett's 1953 Waiting for Godot and Harold Pinter's 1975 No Man's Land rank high on the list of the world drama's enigmatically existential talkfests, placing two aged and futureless characters together in a desolate no man's land with no exit. The authors mix bleak despair with comic patter, which at times approaches vaudeville style, making the plays catnip for a certain caliber of star actor. Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart -- knighted Sirs who spent decades toiling in the theatre before achieving worldwide celebrity as sci-fi movie stars -- have joined together to offer the two plays, in rep, at the Cort Theatre through March 2. While the Beckett is an acknowledged classic, and the Pinter nearly so, they can be tough sledding for audiences; especially those who feel the need to know what it's all about. The authors carefully avoided explaining things, during the initial productions, and thereafter, and with reason. Beckett's Vladimir and Estragon -- more familiarly known ...
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Huffington Post article
Kevin McDonough: In Attacking NBC's 'Hillary' Reince Priebus Lacks Ronald Reagan's Confidence (and Wisdom)
The Huffington Post - over 3 years
Before GOP chairman Reince Priebus started criticizing NBC for announcing its Hillary miniseries project, maybe he should have asked himself, "What would Ronald Reagan Do?" Had he done so, he might have avoided a great deal of noise and embarrassment. Reagan was faced with a very similar situation as he faced reelection, and the course he took was the exact opposite of Reince Priebus's censorious strategy. Reagan's election in 1980, and his hardline reaction to Soviet moves in Afghanistan, Poland and Central America saw a return of cold war tensions. As a result, a widespread fear of nuclear war, not seen since the bomb shelter days of the early 1960s, had returned. Against that backdrop, ABC aired a made-for-television movie called The Day After on November 20, 1983. Starring Jason Robards, it depicted the results of a nuclear strike on Kansas City. It was starkly realistic and terrifying. And it was a hit, attracting an audience of more than a 100 million viewe ...
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The Huffington Post article
Mike Ryan: A Horrible, Horrible Lone Ranger Movie
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Pretty much everything went wrong with 1981's The Legend of the Lone Ranger. Most notably: the production slapped an injunction on Clayton Moore (who had played the Lone Ranger for most of its television run), preventing him from wearing the Lone Ranger costume at public appearances. And then they hired a hellion named Klinton Spilsbury to play the Lone Ranger (who current "Lone Ranger" star Armie Hammer discusses here), but he turned out to be better at getting into fights on and off the set than he was at delivering his lines. (Infamously, actor James Keach would later redub all of Spilsbury's dialogue.) As a child, I had seen bits and pieces of The Legend of the Lone Ranger on HBO, but even then it never held my interest enough for me to make it through the entire movie. (And this was a time in my life that I thought The Dukes of Hazzard was compelling entertainment.) So, now, I will watch The Legend of the Lone Ranger for the first time in its entirety and keep a li ...
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Huffington Post article
Anne Margaret Daniel: F. Scott Fitzgerald and Hollywood: Writing for the Movies, 1937-1940
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) and Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio) have lunch. (Courtesy Warner Brothers) With the new movie version of The Great Gatsby getting more attention by the moment, and since I positively reveled in its New York premiere last week, I've been thinking about F. Scott Fitzgerald's own career as a writer -- of novels, certainly, but also of screenplays. In 1937, Fitzgerald went to work in Hollywood. He had never, despite the flop of his play The Vegetable in 1923, quite given up on the idea of drama. The stage had failed him, and his first trip to Hollywood as a screenwriter in 1927 was a fiasco. But Fitzgerald loved plays, acting (and actresses), and writing dialogue. He was not the first prominent writer, nor would he be the last, to pay his bills writing and doctoring screenplays. William Faulkner, Dorothy Parker, Raymond Chandler, Larry McMurtry, Tom Stoppard and many others have drawn paychecks, and the occasional Oscar, from their work in "t ...
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Huffington Post article
Liz Smith: The Great Holland Taylor As the Great Ann Richards. She Is Broadway's Next Big Thing -- Again
Huffington Post - about 4 years
"EATING!! What a concept!!" said the actress Holland Taylor to me way back when I first met her when we were both young. Since then, the art of eating, dining, food, health and restaurants has become such big business that there are ongoing financial tomes about same, whole sections in newspapers, magazines and on the Internet. The "new theater" is said to be "eating out in restaurants." Or, better, becoming a TV chef. I thought Holland's quote was so good I opened up my book titled Dishing with this, saying. Well, the other night I was able to enjoy eating as a fabulous concept at the Lambs Club right in the heart of what used to be called the dignified "Theater District." What's more -- this happened at a dinner for -- ta, da! -- the birthday of Holland Taylor. The Lambs Club, chock full of photos of the famous who have made their mark on the stage, is at 132 West 44th Street. It has been brilliantly renovated into a glorious building just steps from over-heated, ...
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Huffington Post article
Actress Deborah Raffin Dies At Age 59
Huffington Post - over 4 years
LOS ANGELES — Deborah Raffin, an actress who ran a successful audiobook company with the help of her celebrity friends, has died. She was 59. Raffin died Wednesday of leukemia at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, her brother, William, told the Los Angeles Times ( ). She was diagnosed with the blood cancer about a year ago. http://lat.ms/R0q9NM Raffin, the daughter of 20th Century Fox contract player Trudy Marshall, had roles in movies such as "Forty Carats" and "Once Is Not Enough." She also starred in television miniseries, most notably playing actress Brooke Hayward in "Haywire" and a businesswoman in "Noble House," based on the James Clavell saga set in Hong Kong. She and her then-husband, music producer Michael Viner, launched Dove Books-on-Tape in the mid-1980s, which blossomed into a multimillion-dollar business. The company's first best-seller was Stephen Hawking's opus on the cosmos entitled "A Brief History of Time." Raffin's job was getting ce ...
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Huffington Post article
Critic's Pick: 'Spaghetti Westerns Unchained'
LATimes - over 4 years
American Cinematheque's tribute to spaghetti westerns takes over both the Egyptian and Aero theaters. This wonderfully titled American Cinematheque tribute to the Italian westerns that made Clint Eastwood a major star and director Sergio Leone and composer Ennio Morricone international celebrities is so big that it's taking over both the Hollywood and Santa Monica branches of the Cinematheque. At 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Egyptian Theatre, see the two films that started the trend: 1964's "A Fistful of Dollars" and the sequel, "For a Few Dollars More." The first starred Eastwood in a shameless remake of Akira Kurosawa's "Yojimbo," while the second paired him with the sinister Lee Van Cleef. At 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Aero, lose yourself in Leone's two-hour-and-45-minute "Once Upon a Time in the West." Charles Bronson, Henry Fonda and Jason Robards star as three of the least trustworthy men this side of the Via Veneto. And Claudia Cardinale has a few tricks up her sleeve as well.
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LATimes article
D. R. Tucker: It Cannot Be Denied
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Next year marks the 30th anniversary of ABC's broadcast of The Day After, Nicholas Meyer's film about how middle America copes, or doesn't, with a nuclear attack. An estimated 100 million viewers saw the highly controversial film, which was followed by a discussion, hosted by Ted Koppel, about the merits of a nuclear freeze as opposed to nuclear deterrence. I was only six years old when The Day After was originally broadcast, and I barely remember the national controversy surrounding the film. However, I recently had a chance to watch it and -- pun not intended -- I was blown away. The Day After deserves to be considered the greatest horror film of all-time, without a flaw or defect in its script or direction; the performances by Jason Robards, JoBeth Williams, John Lithgow and Amy Madigan, among others, were uniformly outstanding. Even three decades later -- even after the conclusion of the Cold War -- the film has lost none of its emotional impact. I can't say I was su ...
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Huffington Post article
Ray Bradbury was a huge influence on the film world too
LATimes - over 4 years
The death of Ray Bradbury Tuesday night at the age of 91 throws into relief not only his literary legacy but his abundant influence on the movie world. Starting with the Jack Arnold-directed "It Came From Outer Space," about the crash-landing of a mysterious craft in the Arizona desert, in 1953, Bradbury's work has formed the basis of numerous films. Rod Steiger starred in a 1969 adaptation of his futuristic short-story collection "The Illustrated Man." In 1983, Jason Robards took on Bradbury's horror novel, "Something Wicked This Way Comes," about a pair of teenage boys who experience nightmares when a carnival comes to town. PHOTOS: Ray Bradbury | 1920 - 2012 And in perhaps the most notable big-screen spin on Bradbury's work, French New Wave pioneer Francois Truffaut helmed a version of Bradbury's dystopian book-burning classic "Fahrenheit 451" in 1966. Bradbury's stories and novels also yielded many television adaptations, with the author also writing and creating the ca ...
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LATimes article
WiFilmFest 2012: An interview with "After the Day After" director Nathan Meltz
Dane 101 - almost 5 years
Back in 1983 while growing up in Superior Wis., Nathan Meltz, director of "After the Day After," remembers overhearing his parents discuss whether they should allow the 8-year-old Meltz and his brother watch the made-for-TV movie, The Day After. He remembers his mother said, “Well, we let them watch Star Wars, so this can’t be any worse.” The original The Day After starred John Lithgow, Jason Robards and Steve Guttenburg. It's famously known for a graphic nuclear showdown between the United States and the Soviet Union. The movie shocked many viewers and forced ABC and local TV affiliates to open 1-800 hotlines with counselors during it’s original broadcast. Meltz describes the original TV Movie. “So the movie is total droll and cheesy, but the scenes of the nuclear destruction is horrifying. All these people become skeletons. The city gets turned to rubble. It’s just horrifying.” The premise of the Meltz animation shor ...
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Dane 101 article
It's palatable, but it's not Pinter - Hamilton Spectator
Google News - over 5 years
Years ago on Broadway, I saw Christopher Plummer and Jason Robards Jr. in Harold Pinter's No Man's Land. It's one of Pinter's greatest plays. As usual with this playwright, it's filled with dark resonance and brooding menace
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Google News article
Yahoo's Robinson making all the right moves - Bloguin (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I remember a scene from "All the President's Men" when Jason Robards, who playing Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, says "Fuck it, we'll stand by the boys." Now, I'm not sure that's what anyone at Yahoo! Sports is saying about Charles Robinson,
Article Link:
Google News article
Get ready for this weekend's armageddon by reading our top 5 movie hurricanes - IFC
Google News - over 5 years
Based on the same novel as the 1937 movie (we just can't escape it), this film featured a much steamier poster and featured Mia Farrow, Jason Robards and Max von Sydow. The acting improved, and all of the hurricane action came in color this time around
Article Link:
Google News article
Former poet laureate Helen Norris offers insight into fiction writing - Press-Register - al.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
That HBO special starring Harris and Jason Robards is often aired at Christmastime. Helen keeps a very flattering note from Robards within easy reach. She says she has always found her own life “uninteresting in the recital.” Others find her voice and
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jason Robards
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2000
    Age 77
    In 2000, Robards received the first Monte Cristo Award, presented by the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, and named after O'Neill's home.
    More Details Hide Details Subsequent recipients have included Edward Albee, Kevin Spacey, Wendy Wasserstein, and Christopher Plummer. Jason Robards narrated the public radio documentary, Schizophrenia: Voices of an Illness, produced by Lichtenstein Creative Media, which was awarded a 1994 George Foster Peabody Award for Excellence in Broadcasting. According to Time, Robards offered to narrate the schizophrenia program, saying that his first wife had been institutionalized for that illness. Jason Robards is in the American Theater Hall of Fame; he was inducted in 1979.
  • 1999
    Age 76
    In 1999, he was among the recipients at the Kennedy Center Honors, an annual honor given to those in the performing arts for their lifetime of contributions to American culture.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1997
    Age 74
    In 1997, Robards received the U.S. National Medal of Arts, the highest honor conferred to an individual artist on behalf of the people.
    More Details Hide Details Recipients are selected by the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts and the medal is awarded by the President of the United States.
  • 1983
    Age 60
    In 1983, Robards starred in the television movie The Day After where he played Dr. Russell Oakes.
    More Details Hide Details The movie is one of the most viewed television programs of all time. Robards voiced a number of documentaries, including Ken Burns's Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio (1991). In Magnolia (1999), his final feature film role, the ailing Robards portrayed a dying man who reconnects with his estranged son, played by Tom Cruise. Robards received eight Tony Award nominations, – more than any other male actor. He won the Tony for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play for his work in The Disenchanted, (1959); this was also his only stage appearance with his father. He received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in consecutive years: for All the President's Men (1976), portraying Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, and for Julia (1977), portraying writer Dashiell Hammett (1977). He was also nominated for another Academy Award for his role as Howard Hughes in Melvin and Howard (1980).
  • FIFTIES
  • 1977
    Age 54
    The next year, he played fictional president Richard Monckton (based on Richard Nixon) in the 1977 television miniseries Washington: Behind Closed Doors based on John Ehrlichman's roman à clef The Company.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1976
    Age 53
    Robards appeared in two dramatizations based on the Watergate scandal. In 1976, he portrayed Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee in the film All the President's Men, based on the book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1969
    Age 46
    They divorced in 1969, in significant part because of his alcoholism.
    More Details Hide Details In 1972, he was seriously injured in an automobile accident when he drove his car into the side of a mountain on a winding California road, requiring extensive surgery and facial reconstruction. The accident may have been related to his longtime struggle with alcoholism. Robards overcame his addiction and went on to publicly campaign for alcoholism awareness. Robards was an American Civil War buff and scholar, an interest which informed his portrayal of the voice of Ulysses S. Grant in The Civil War series by filmmaker Ken Burns.
  • 1964
    Age 41
    Robards played three different U.S. presidents in film. He played the role of Abraham Lincoln in the TV movie The Perfect Tribute (1991) and supplied the voice for two television documentaries, first for "The Presidency: A Splendid Misery" in 1964, and then again in the title role of the 1992 documentary miniseries Lincoln.
    More Details Hide Details He also played the role of Ulysses S. Grant in The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981) and supplied the Union General's voice in the PBS miniseries The Civil War (1990). He also played Franklin D. Roosevelt in FDR: The Final Years (1980).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1962
    Age 39
    He repeated his role in Long Day's Journey into Night in the 1962 film and televised his performances in A Moon for the Misbegotten (1975) and Hughie (1984).
    More Details Hide Details Robards also appeared onstage in a revival of O'Neill's Ah, Wilderness! (1988) directed by Arvin Brown, as well as Lillian Hellman's Toys in the Attic (1960), Arthur Miller's After the Fall (1964), Clifford Odets's The Country Girl (1972), and Harold Pinter's No Man's Land (1994). He made his film debut in the two-reel comedy Follow That Music (1947), but after his Broadway success, he was invited to make his feature debut in The Journey (1959). He became a familiar face to movie audiences throughout the 1960s, notably for his performances in A Thousand Clowns (1965) (repeating his stage performance), The Night They Raided Minsky's (1968), and Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). He appeared on television anthology series, including two segments in the mid-1950s of CBS's Appointment with Adventure.
  • 1961
    Age 38
    Robards had six children from his four marriages, including actor Jason Robards III (born 1949) by his first wife, Eleanor Pittman; and actor Sam Robards by his third wife, actress Lauren Bacall, to whom he was married in 1961.
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  • 1956
    Age 33
    Robards got into acting after the war and his career began slowly. He moved to New York City and found small parts – first in radio and then on the stage. His big break was landing the starring role in José Quintero's 1956 off Broadway theatre revival production and the later 1960 television film of O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh, portraying the philosophical salesman Hickey; he won an Obie Award for his stage performance.
    More Details Hide Details He later portrayed Hickey again in another 1985 Broadway revival also staged by Quintero. Robards created the role of Jamie Tyrone in the original Broadway production of O'Neill's Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning Long Day's Journey into Night, which was also directed by Quintero; Robards appeared in the lead role of James Tyrone, Sr., in a 1988 production of the same play. Other O'Neill plays directed by Quintero and featuring Robards included Hughie (1964), A Touch of the Poet (1977), and A Moon for the Misbegotten (1973).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1944
    Age 21
    Two years later, in November 1944, Robards was radioman on the USS Nashville (CL-43), the flagship for the invasion of Mindoro in the northern Philippines.
    More Details Hide Details On December 13, she was struck by a kamikaze aircraft off Negros Island in the Philippines. The aircraft hit one of the port five-inch gun mounts, while its two bombs set the midsection ablaze. With this damage and 223 casualties, the Nashville was forced to return to Pearl Harbor and then to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington, for repairs. Robards served honorably during the war, but was not a recipient of the U.S. Navy Cross for bravery, as has been recorded in numerous sources. The inaccurate story derives from a 1979 column by Hy Gardner. On the Nashville, Robards first found a copy of Eugene O'Neill's play Strange Interlude in the ship's library. Also while in the Navy, he first started thinking seriously about becoming an actor. He had emceed for a Navy band in Pearl Harbor, got a few laughs, and decided he liked it. His father suggested he enroll in the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1941
    Age 18
    Following the completion of recruit training and radio school, Robards was assigned to a heavy cruiser, the USS Northampton (CA-26) in 1941 as a radioman 3rd class.
    More Details Hide Details On December 7, 1941, the Northampton was at sea in the Pacific Ocean about off Hawaii. Contrary to some stories, he witnessed the devastation of the Japanese attack on Hawaii only afterwards, when the Northampton returned to Pearl Harbor two days later. The Northampton was later directed into the Guadalcanal campaign in World War II's Pacific theater, where she participated in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. During the Battle of Tassafaronga in the waters north of Guadalcanal on the night of November 30, 1942, the Northampton was sunk by hits from two Japanese torpedoes. Robards found himself treading water until near daybreak, when he was rescued by an American destroyer. For her service in the war, the Northampton was awarded six battle stars.
  • 1940
    Age 17
    Although his prowess in sports attracted interest from several universities, Robards decided to enlist in the United States Navy upon his graduation in 1940.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Born
    Born on July 26, 1922.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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