Jay Tavare
American actor
Jay Tavare
Jay Tavare is an American film actor and journalist. His career spans more than 18 years. A blogger on The Huffington Post, he also serves as a spokesman of non-profit groups related to aiding Native American children and elders on several reservations. Of White Mountain Apache (Dzil Łigai Si'án Ndee - “People of the White Mountains”) and Navajo ancestry, he has used his public position to aid his peoples.
Biography
Jay Tavare's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Jay Tavare from around the web
Jay Tavare: Olympians: Higher, Faster, Stronger
Huffington Post Sports - over 4 years
When I look for real inspiration, I find no stage bigger, no drama more gripping, no story more moving than those of the men and women who compete every four years in the modern day Olympic Games. These modern day superathletes are known as Olympians. I had the pleasure of attending the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London, England this past month. Great Britain spent billions of dollars getting ready for the games, which was not an easy sell to the British public in a recession year. Many of the hotels and Central London streets were affected by the poor turnout, hurting many of the local businesses. I asked a London cab driver what he thought contributed to this. He said folks were frightened away by the hotels tripling their prices and all the warnings given by the authorities to the locals to stay away from Central London during the games. Despite the difficulties, Team GB did deliver the most gold medals of any games for their home team. But when the dust had settled, t ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post Sports article
Jay Tavare: Ancient Interpreters: Virgil Ortiz
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Like many people, I often think of what I would do or ask if I was in the presence of a great historic person. I remember when I had the privilege of spending time with the late Lakota Elder and Medicine man, Grandpa Wallace Black Elk. I asked him to tell me one thing I could do to help the next generation. He looked at me with his ancient face and said, "We need more interpreters and translators. We need people like you to take the ancient stories and tell them in a way so that the next generation understands them. That is the challenge." Those simple but powerful words never left my thoughts. Recently I had the pleasure of working with Cochiti Pueblo Native Virgil Ortiz. Virgil is a groundbreaking artist and fashion designer. His clay works are displayed worldwide in prestigious venues, including the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in New York City, the Stedelijk Museum's-Hertogenbosch in The Netherlands, and his current exhibit at Fondation Cartier' ...
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Huffington Post article
Jay Tavare: The Last of Her Breed -- Elbys Onea Naiche Hugar
Huffington Post - over 4 years
In American history, there have been many icons that we know about, but also a few most of us have never heard of who have had an impact on so many people in their journeys through life. Elbys Onea Naiche Hugar was one such soul. She was a true American icon who passed away at age 82 at midday on June 13 in Mescalero, New Mexico. She was surrounded by her family who are the direct descendants of the legendary Chief of the Chiricahua, Cochise.   Cochise was the closest thing the Apache had to a King. He united many of the Apache bands and leaders and was considered a great commander and peacemaker among his people. Elbys was the great-granddaughter of Cochise. Her grandfather was Chief Naiche, one of Cochise's two sons. Naiche was the last leader of the only free band of Indians left in America in the 1880s, alongside Geronimo. Naiche was held as a prisoner of war for almost 28 years, along with other Chiricahua Apaches. His son Christian Naiche Jr., who was Elby Hugar's fath ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Jay Tavare: Winnetou: The German Apache
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Imagine being locked up in a prison where all you can do is read historic books about the Southwest United States and dream of how the American Indian warriors roamed the deserts of Arizona on horseback, free as the wind and as one with the elements. That is exactly what Karl May, one of the most famous authors in German history, did 100 years ago while he was incarcerated for petty crimes he had committed in his early years. Even though his books have sold more than 150 million copies and have been translated into multiple languages, most Americans have never heard of Karl May or his stories. But in his native country Germany, Karl May's books and the characters that drive them have become part of the fabric of German culture. Just like in the U.S., many Germans grew up playing cowboys and Indians, but because of Karl May's stories, they all wanted to be the Native American instead of the cowboy. The lead characters in his books -- Winnetou, a magnificent Mescalero A ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Jay Tavare: Indian Givers
Huffington Post - about 5 years
Twenty-five people from different backgrounds, cultures and nations, made a commitment to come together for a single purpose -- to help the Navajo Elders and to learn from each other
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Fires of New Mexico: it's not a new problem, and it's not just in Los Alamos - Blogger News Network (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Actor Jay Tavare, whose birthparents were White Mountain Apache and Navajo, has a report with photos about attending an “honor your life” meeting at the Mescalero High School, and writes about the Apache he met, and mentions the nearby fire on that
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Google News article
TV WEEKEND; An Old West Saga, Told From Both Sides
NYTimes - over 11 years
The first Indian massacre on ''Into the West'' is committed by a herd of stampeding buffalo, not by vigilantes or the United States cavalry. The first scalping of a frontiersman is the work of a grizzly bear, not of an Indian brave on the warpath. Nature is the most fearsome enemy -- and coveted prize -- in TNT's six-part miniseries about Western
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NYTimes article
FILM REVIEWS; Lovers Striving for a Reunion, With a War in the Way
NYTimes - about 13 years
Were it not for a gruesomely violent battle sequence at the beginning, a smattering of profanity and an occasional glimpse of unclothed flesh, ''Cold Mountain'' might easily be mistaken for the product of an earlier era of movie-making. The film, freely adapted by Anthony Minghella from Charles Frazier's best-selling novel, is an episodic romance
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NYTimes article
FILM REVIEW; Forever Obsessing About Obsession
NYTimes - about 14 years
More than once in the week after I saw ''Adaptation,'' I found myself suddenly awake in the middle of the night, pulse racing, fretting over the movie's intricate, fascinating themes. Since quite a few of the films I see have a decidedly soporific effect, those bouts of insomnia might in themselves be sufficient grounds for recommending this one.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jay Tavare
    THIRTIES
  • 2009
    Age 32
    After the severe winter of 2009-2010, when many could not get around because of snow, the ANE and Tavare began the Warming Hearts Firewood program, specifically to raise donations to supply elders with firewood through the winter.
    More Details Hide Details He writes a blog for The Huffington Post. He has been an invited speaker at Brown University.
  • 2008
    Age 31
    His first role in film was as the narcissistic Spanish ninja Vega in the Street Fighter (film) of the video game series Street Fighter. As a guest star on the CSI Miami 2008 season finale, Tavare performed all his own stunts, including a 23-story free fall.
    More Details Hide Details He often prepares and performs his own stunts when the role calls for it. His repertoire of physical skills includes martial arts, dancing, acrobatics, bare back riding, archery and swordsmanship. He has worked to publicize non-profits for several Indian nations. He travels regularly to visit the youth at the Mescalero Apache reservation in New Mexico. He has reported on the issue of teenage suicide and publicized a suicide prevention program at the reservation, called Honor Your Life. Tavare is the celebrity spokesperson for Adopt-a-Native-Elder (ANE), a non-profit organization organized by two women, Linda Myers and Grace Yellowhammer, that provides support through donations and volunteers to 500 Navajo elders in Utah and Arizona who choose to live traditionally.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1976
    Born
    Born on March 23, 1976.
    More Details Hide Details
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