Jean-Louis Trintignant
actor
Jean-Louis Trintignant
Jean-Louis Xavier Trintignant is a French actor who has enjoyed international acclaim. He won the Best Actor Award at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival.
Biography
Jean-Louis Trintignant's personal information overview.
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News
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French 'Amour' star Trintignant bows out of acting
Yahoo News - over 3 years
PARIS (AFP) - Veteran French actor Jean-Louis Trintignant, the star of Oscar-winning film "Amour" who rose to fame opposite Brigitte Bardot in "And God Created Woman," is bowing out of a critically-acclaimed career.
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Yahoo News article
Vicky Tiel: The Sexual Revolution Started in the Late Fifties in Paris with Two Movies and Two Big Movie Stars
Huffington Post - over 3 years
The sexual revolution started in the late fifties in Paris with two movies and two big movie stars: Brigitte Bardot in And God Created a Woman in 1956 and Jean Paul Belmondo in Breathless in 1959. Brigitte had real sex (to completion) on camera with her co star and later lover, Jean Louis Trintignant, while her husband Roger Vadim directed the scene. Free love was born. The Queen of the Sexual Revolution was Brigitte and women everywhere copied her hair, her makeup and her first bikini that she barely wore at Cannes and the hot pants she wore with boots on the streets of Paris. Jean Paul Belmondo had casual sex with nice girl, an American in Paris, Jean Seberg and at last America's puritanical image ETAIT FINI ! Earlier in America, Jane Russell had showed her bra-less big breasts in The Outlaw and Marilyn Monroe had brought naive sexuality to the screen in How to Marry a Millionaire and Some like it Hot both stars breaking grounds in Hollywood but it ...
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Huffington Post article
French rock star who killed girlfriend plans comeback
Guardian (UK) - over 3 years
Bertrand Cantat, convicted of murdering film-star girlfriend in 2003, plans to release first solo album later this year He was the one of the biggest French rock-stars of the 1990s, whose career seemed over for good when he was convicted of murdering his film-star girlfriend during an argument in a Lithuanian hotel room in 2003. But Bertrand Cantat, the former frontman of the French band Noir Desir – who was released in 2010 after serving half of his eight-year jail term – is planning to release a new solo album later this year, a move likely to provoke outrage from campaigners against domestic violence. Confirmation of Cantat's first solo album, tentatively slated for November, comes at a time when his image could hardly be worse. Although he has a loyal fan-base – particularly around Bordeaux where he spent much of his youth – his name remains synonymous with one of the most shocking domestic violence cases of recent years. Marie Trintignant, 41, a popular and respected actor and ...
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Guardian (UK) article
David Wallechinsky: Academy Awards 2013: Foreign Language Films
Huffington Post - about 4 years
This year a record 71 countries submitted entries in the Best Foreign Language Film category. I managed to see 61 of these films. Although there were many entertaining movies, the overall mood was bleak. As one of my viewing companions put it, it's as if the stories were conceived during the financial crisis of 2008, written in 2009, funded in 2010, produced in 2011 and released in 2012. Here are my comments on the five nominees, as well some non-nominees that I consider noteworthy. Amour (Austria) After the initial screenings of the 71 foreign language films, it seemed like the battle for the Oscar would be between Amour and the popular French entry, The Intouchables. However, thanks to its questionable political correctness and to the dubious system by which 30 people choose the five nominees from a short list of nine, The Intouchables didn't even get nominated. That left Amour as the overwhelming favorite, particularly as it was also nominated in four other categorie ...
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Huffington Post article
Angela Bonavoglia: 11th Hour Contrarian's Take on the Oscar Noms
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Okay, it's late, I know, but I've finally seen most of those Oscar-nominated films and I've got some questions for those judges. Let's start with Amour, the French film about an octogenarian couple's descent into darkness. It's beautifully done in that it is uber-realistic. At the same time, you're literally stuck in that apartment as Death stalks Anne, the wife (Emmanuelle Riva), and husband George (Jean-Louis Trintignant) tries to resist as long as he can, until he can't anymore. As each still and silent scene dragged on, I sighed and rolled my eyes, longing to get the hell to the next scene and out of the theater. It was a kind of torture watching a woman deteriorate into that dreaded "locked in" zone where you know what's going on but you are totally incapable of responding. I get why the nominations, surely for the performances of the two actors, which were astonishing. But I have mixed feelings about the film, and I'm really mad about one thing. As Anne got ...
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Huffington Post article
Jon Eig: All-Time Oscars: The 10 Best Performances by a Leading Actor
Huffington Post - about 4 years
This is getting hard. I wanted to leave room for James Stewart and George C. Scott. I wanted at least one Nicholson or Pacino. I toyed with the idea of leaving spots empty for all the actors I no doubt forgot. But, lists must be made, and so here are my 10 nominees for the greatest performance by a lead actor (OF ALL TIME!). Humphrey Bogart (In a Lonely Place): We all know Bogart could be cool (Spade and Marlowe). We all know he could be weak and disturbed (Fred C. Dobbs and Captain Queeg). But as Dixon Steele in Nicholas Ray's underrated gem, he is both, and then some. Extra points for playing a violent screenwriter. Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York): One day, and it may not be long, Mr. Day-Lewis may be considered the greatest actor in the history of film. He is certainly building the resume for it. As Bill "The Butcher" Cutting in Gangs of New York, he may be too good, because he blows his co-star/rival Leonardo DeCaprio out of the water, so that you can ...
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Huffington Post article
SaraKay Smullens: "Amour": A Different Perspective on a Brilliant, Haunting Film
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Since the beginning of the new year, I have heard again and again about the new work of Austrian film maker Michael Haneke, whose signature works includes "Funny Game," "The White Ribbon," and "Cache." This latest work, "Amour," has been described as riveting and compassionate, yet totally unnerving and depressing, "Considering its topic, how could it be anything else?" I have been warned, in one way or the other, with constancy. But I came away from this film with a different emphasis: the fortune of this couple, their exclusivity, and their isolation from their daughter. As most theatre lovers know by now, "Amour" focuses on the final chapter in the married life and love of a devoted couple, each former music teachers. Adding to the quality and charisma of the film, the couple, Anne and Georges Laurent, is played by two extraordinary, beloved European actors, known for decades in their younger years to so very many in every country where film is appreciated, Emmanu ...
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Huffington Post article
Candy Spelling: Love in the Time of Awards Season
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Once again it's that time of year that all of us movie buffs love -- awards season. The red carpets, designer gowns and beautiful hairstyles are all so glamorous and exciting. There are so many wonderful films up for Best Picture Oscars this year and they are all so different from one another. The suspense of films like Argo and Zero Dark Thirty. The refreshing surprise of Silver Linings Playbook, the masterpiece Les Miserables and of course the epic Lincoln. These are just a few of my favorites. Ironically, one of the most memorable movies and one that happens to be nominated for Best Picture as well as Best Foreign Language Oscar is about as far from suspenseful or charming as any film could be. The movie I am referring to is Amour. It is a very somber film to say the least. So much in fact that even the head judge at Cannes was said to have despised it. Based on the plot line and some brutal reviews, I didn't run out to the nearest movie theater to see it. Most people ...
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Huffington Post article
Susan Y. Chi: Amour: No Love For Ageism
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Austrian director Michael Haneke's Amour has captured five Oscar nominations, including an unprecedented sweep of both Best Picture and Best Foreign Film. The majority of critical praise for the film focuses on its balance of compassion and brutality in presenting the final days of an elderly French couple as they endure the sordid demands of dying. Anne and Georges Laurent are retired music instructors in their eighth decade of life who have shared a long, loving marriage. After a stroke Anne begins a trajectory of physical and cognitive decline and Georges is forced to shift exhaustively from the roles of lover, husband, father, and peer, to caretaker. Each new medical requirement marks the end to a piece of life they've shared. If this sounds like a brutal examination of the perils of growing old, it is. However, Amour accomplishes vastly more than paint a picture of aging and dying, and to reduce its scope to such is to relegate the story of Anne and Georges -- th ...
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Huffington Post article
The Oscars Issue: Jean-Louis Trintignant Surprises in ‘Amour’
NYTimes - about 4 years
Almost unseen on screen this millennium, Jean-Louis Trintignant has returned with a quietly confident, and award-winning, performance in “Amour.”
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NYTimes article
Christina Patterson: At Last, Some Films That Acknowledge That People Get Old
Huffington Post - about 4 years
"Who is it," says a character called Cissy in Quartet, "who said 'old age is not for sissies'?" The character, played by Pauline Collins in Dustin Hoffman's first film as a director, can't remember. But then she can't remember quite a lot of things. In this, she is like many of her fellow residents at the retirement home for musicians where she now lives. Some of them, like Jean, played by Maggie Smith, repeat themselves. Others, like Wilf, played by Billy Connolly, have problems with their prostate, and piles. "Why do we have to get old?" Jean asks her long-estranged ex-husband, who's also at the home. "Because," says the character, played by Tom Courtenay, "that's what people do." Yes, people do get old, though you wouldn't normally know it from films. But at the moment, if you choose carefully, you might. If, for example, you go to see Trouble with the Curve, you'll see Clint Eastwood struggling to pee, and bashing a car against the walls of the garage, and burning a ...
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Huffington Post article
Scott Mendelson: 2012 in Film: The Runner-Ups
The Huffington Post - about 4 years
As we continue recapping the movies that arguably defined 2012, we move on to what I like to call 'The Runner-Ups'.  These films are all very good if not great.  Either they didn't quite make my 'favorite of the year' list or they aren't the kind of thing that belongs on a traditional best-of-year list (you'll see which ones I'm referring to below).  Anyway, consider this a 'great films that aren't among the very best but I darn-well wanted to highlight them' list.  As always, the films below are in alphabetical order.  Without further ado... Argo (review): In a year where old-school big-studio genre films for adults solidified their comeback, this Ben Affleck political period piece is the defining example of everything going right.  It cost just $45 million, so it didn't need to be a massive hit to make a profit, but a massive hit it was.  With around $105 million at the domestic till so far, it's among the year's top Oscar contenders, and I still have an inkling that Be ...
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The Huffington Post article
The Oscars Issue: Jean-Louis Trintignant Surprises in ‘Amour’
NYTimes - about 4 years
Almost unseen on screen this millennium, Jean-Louis Trintignant has returned with a quietly confident, and award-winning, performance in “Amour.”
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Movie review: 'Amour' an emotional tale of enduring love
LATimes - about 4 years
In 'Amour,' Michael Haneke explores the devastating effects of a wife's strokes on a marriage. Emmanuelle Riva's and Jean-Louis Trintignant's performances are a revelation. It won the Palme d'Or at Cannes. It accomplished an unprecedented sweep of the European Film Awards, taking best picture, director, actor and actress. The Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. thinks it's the best picture of the year, and so do I. What is it about Michael Haneke's "Amour" that inspires this level of fervor and respect, given that it's basically a two-character drama set almost exclusively in an unassuming Paris apartment?
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LATimes article
The Best Movie of the Year: Michael Haneke's Amour
The New Republic - about 4 years
Readers may say, “Well, you don’t like many films,” and they’d be right. I thought Prometheus was a catastrophe, Argo overrated, Anna Karenina risible, The Deep Blue Sea regrettable. “You didn’t even like The Master.” No, I didn’t, and I may be a mean-minded Grinch; or, maybe there just aren’t so many good films. But I suggested you see The Loneliest Planet, Lincoln, Dream of a Life, and Oslo, August 31st—not that I think any of those are great. But now at the end of the year comes a masterpiece, not just the best of the year, but one of the best ever: Michael Haneke’s Amour. I should add that the film is released in this country by Sony Classics, and one of the heads of that company is a good friend. I cannot help that, and I believe I have been honest with him. I think, among his other films, Rust and Bone is the object of too much respect, his documentary West of Memphis is a rather arty mess made from a compelling subject. As for To Rome with Love, another step in Woody’s Allen o ...
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The New Republic article
Michael Vazquez: NYFF50 Screens 2013 Oscar Nominee Amour
Huffington Post - over 4 years
I'm guessing the winner of the 2013 Oscar for Best Foreign Film will be Amour, one of my favorite films from the 50th New York Film Festival, which ended Sunday. Upon his deathbed, Franz Kafka's only request from those offering him comfort was that they drink water, so he could vicariously partake of what was no longer possible. In Amour, Michael Haneke's case study of coupledom, loyalty and old age, Anne, a music teacher facing the insidious debilitation and growing travails resultant of two cardiac episodes, asks her former piano student -- now a world famous muso -- to play a song she taught him years ago. Her existential longing -- delivered via the serene, broad-faced Emmanuelle Riva's masterly Cheshire Sphinx countenance, lovingly photographed by Darius Khondji -- makes the virtuoso (after a slight hesitation) forgo considerations of throwing his timing, and honor his teacher's request. Water-as-life is also very present in this chronicle of death foretold, thoug ...
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Huffington Post article
5 To Watch From Telluride: Marion Cotillard, Argo, Bill Murray, A Royal Affair & Amour
Movie Line - over 4 years
Bill Murray, Photo copyright Pamela Gentile Ben Affleck's look at a hidden story from the Iranian hostage crisis, Bill Murray as FDR, Marion Cotillard playing a woman whose life is dramatically altered in an instant, as well as a pair of acclaimed foreign language films are just a few of the most buzzed about movies coming out of this year's Telluride Film Festival. Over the course of just four days here in this Colorado mountain town, attendees got a head start peek at some of the best movies of the year. Films and performance that will have moviegoers talking this fall. Marion Cotillard Saturday night here in Telluride, French actress Marion Cotillard sat at a small dinner alongside director James Gray. Directors Alexander Payne and Sally Potter were among those wishing her well at the intimate gathering after her on stage tribute. Cotillard is starring in Gray's upcoming movie, Nightingale and Gray was here in Colorado to salute her on stage as she received a festival tribute. Wh ...
Article Link:
Movie Line article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jean-Louis Trintignant
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2007
    Age 76
    He suffered a leg injury from a motorcycle accident in June 2007.
    More Details Hide Details His first wife was actress Stéphane Audran. His second wife, Nadine Marquand, was also an actress as well as a screenwriter and director. They had three children: Vincent Trintignant, Pauline (who died of crib death in 1969) and Marie Trintignant (21 January 1962 – 1 August 2003). At the age of 17, Marie performed in La terrazza alongside her father and later became a successful actress in her own right. She was killed at the age of 41 by her boyfriend, singer Bertrand Cantat, in a hotel room in Vilnius, Lithuania. Trintignant is good friends with Anouk Aimée. It was he who recommended Aimée to film director Claude Lelouch for the female lead in A Man and a Woman. Trintignant was nominated to receive the César five times: in 1987, 1995, 1996, 1999, and in 2013.
  • 1994
    Age 63
    In 1994, he starred in Krzysztof Kieślowski's last film, Three Colors: Red.
    More Details Hide Details Though he takes an occasional film role, he has, as of late, been focusing essentially on his stage work. After a 14-year gap, Trintignant came back on screen for Michael Haneke's film Amour. Haneke had sent Trintignant the script, which had been written specifically for him. Trintignant said that he chooses which films he works in on the basis of the director, and said of Haneke that "he has the most complete mastery of the cinematic discipline, from technical aspects like sound and photography to the way he handles actors".
  • FIFTIES
  • 1983
    Age 52
    Throughout the 1970s, Trintignant starred in numerous films and in 1983 he made his first English language feature film, Under Fire.
    More Details Hide Details Following this, he starred in François Truffaut's final film, Confidentially Yours, and reprised his best-known role in the sequel A Man and a Woman: 20 Years Later.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1955
    Age 24
    After touring in the early 1950s in several theater productions, his first motion picture appearance came in 1955 and the following year he gained stardom with his performance opposite Brigitte Bardot in Roger Vadim's And God Created Woman.
    More Details Hide Details Trintignant’s acting was interrupted for several years by mandatory military service. After serving in Algiers, he returned to Paris and resumed his work in film. He had the leading male role in the classic A Man and a Woman, which at the time was the most successful French film ever screened in the foreign market. In Italy, he was always dubbed into Italian, and his work stretched into collaborations with renowned Italian directors, including Sergio Corbucci in The Great Silence, Valerio Zurlini in Violent Summer and The Desert of the Tartars, Ettore Scola in La terrazza, Bernardo Bertolucci in The Conformist, and Dino Risi in the cult film The Easy Life.
  • 1951
    Age 20
    Trintignant was born in Piolenc, Vaucluse, France, the son of Claire (née Tourtin) and Raoul Trintignant, an industrialist. At the age of twenty, Trintignant moved to Paris to study drama, and made his theatrical debut in 1951 going on to be seen as one of the most gifted French actors of the post-war era.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1933
    Age 2
    Trintignant comes from a wealthy family. He is the nephew of race car driver, Louis Trintignant, who was killed in 1933 while practising on the Péronne racetrack in Picardy.
    More Details Hide Details Another uncle, Maurice Trintignant (1917–2005), was a Formula One driver who twice won the Monaco Grand Prix as well as the 24 hours of Le Mans. Raised in and around automobile racing, Jean-Louis Trintignant was the natural choice of film director Claude Lelouch for the starring role of race car driver in the 1966 film, A Man and a Woman.
  • 1930
    Born
    Born on December 11, 1930.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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