Jean Seberg
Actress
Jean Seberg
Jean Dorothy Seberg was an American actress. She starred in 37 films in Hollywood and in France, including Bonjour Tristesse, Breathless (1960), the musical Paint Your Wagon (1969), and the disaster film Airport (1970). Seberg is also one of the best-known victims of the FBI COINTELPRO project. Her victimization was rendered as a well-documented retaliation for her support of civil rights and activist groups in the 1960s.
Biography
Jean Seberg's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Jean Seberg from around the web
Paris, je t'aime - Sydney Morning Herald
Google News - over 5 years
In Paris she cuts off all of her hair - ''she was too embarrassed to say that she wanted to look like Jean Seberg in La Bout de Souffle,'' ridding herself of her clumpy clothes and her terrible comedian boyfriend, Ian. In one hot, sticky summer,
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Moline filmmakers' documentary to open film festival - Quad City Times
Google News - over 5 years
The “Country School” showing will be preceded by a two-minute teaser for “Movie Star: The Secret Lives of Jean Seberg,” a documentary the Rundles have made on the Iowa-born actress, which is scheduled to be released this winter
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The Realism of Retro - The Vienna Review
Google News - over 5 years
In this American projection of “France,” the stereotypes mingle with pop culture: At the Café Select, we hear the jinglings of American jazz pianist Art Tatum in the background; street sounds are pierced by Jean Seberg hollering “New York Herald
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FREE FILM SCHOOL #9 - Who is Jean-Luc Godard? - Crave Online
Google News - over 5 years
It was about a criminal layabout – played by ultra-suave, ennui-infused lounge lizard Jean-Paul Belmondo – who spends his time stealing cars, playing around with his American mistress (Jean Seberg), and smoking cigarettes in the streets of Paris
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7 Films That Prove A Perfect Movie Should Run 90 Minutes Or Less - Cinema Blend
Google News - over 5 years
The film is the epitome of Godard's theory that "All you need for a movie is a gun and a girl," and it doesn't hurt if the girl is Jean Seberg and the gun is in the hands of Jean Paul Bellamondo. Godard's inventive stylistic choices, like introducing
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Look de niño… no para todas - A.M.
Google News - over 5 years
Los cortes tipo Jean Seberg o Mia Farrow, famosos por allá en los años 60, vuelven con mucha fuerza, como puede verse en estrellas como Emma Watson, quien lució espectacular para la premiere de la última saga de Harry Potter
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Making Waves, With No Apology - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
When the Sirens in the Odyssey lure men to their deaths, they don't do it with a Jean Seberg do. Not to say I always felt so adamant about what is, in truth, the defining aspect of my appearance. I must have been having a Moment in high school,
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Meet the New Girl: Merethe Hopland Can Sometimes Be Selfish, But She Doesn't ... - New York Magazine (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Sporting a Jean Seberg-inspired cut, Norwegian model Merethe Hopland looks like a fresh, Nordic take on a young Charlize Theron. The 20-year-old signed with Marilyn Agency late last year, and is coming off a successful fall 2011 fashion week: Hopland
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The Films Of Otto Preminger: A Retrospective - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
[B-] Following Preminger's disastrous first film with his discovery Jean Seberg, “St. Joan,” which was both a critical and financial failure, with a heap of the critical vitriol heaped upon Seberg's performance. Preminger offered her a second chance
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Jean-Luc Godard: his best films - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Breathless is a footloose, free-wheeling dash through the doomed romance between Jean Seberg's newspaper vendor and Jean-Paul Belmondo's hoodlum, hot-wired with jump-cuts and homages and shot on the run, without a permit, on the sunny streets of Paris
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Emma, Rupert, Tom and Ralph reveal feelings on final 'Potter' - Manila Bulletin
Google News - over 5 years
I love Jean Seberg, Edie Sedgwick, Jane Birkin, Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn so I kind of look backwards but then try to make it modern. I am also big on Valentino at the moment actually.” For the last “Harry Potter” premiere that happened last week,
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Lancôme cultivates fragrance pillar with Trésor Midnight Rose - MoodieReport
Google News - over 5 years
The advertising campaign was shot by Mario Testino. The TV spot pays tribute to the French Nouvelle Vague movement, most notably Jean-Luc Goddard's À Bout de Souffle (Breathless). Watson, with her pixie crop, evokes Godard's iconic heroine, Jean Seberg
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Blake Lively is a fashion icon. Source: Supplied - Herald Sun
Google News - over 5 years
A fan of old Hollywood, Lively lists Paul Newman, Audrey Hepburn, Grace Kelly and Jean Seberg as her heroes. As for contemporary role models, she points to Daniel Day-Lewis, Cate Blanchett and Annette Bening. Actors of that calibre have the sort of
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Daphne Guinness And Joe Lally Pay Homage To Jean Seberg In "The Murder Of Jean ... - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
In "The Murder of Jean Seberg," Daphne Guinness and Joseph Lally pay homage to film icon Jean Seberg whose is best known for her role as the charming and conniving Patricia in Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless." The film is not a movie, it has no narrative
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The Princess of Montpensier - Top 5 French Auteurs - The Fan Carpet
Google News - over 5 years
His catalogue is vast and includes such greats as Breathless (À bout de souffle, 1960), starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg which distinctly expressed the French New Wave's style – the film employed various innovative techniques such as jump
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jean Seberg
    FORTIES
  • 1979
    Age 40
    He claimed that she had attempted suicide in July 1979 by jumping in front of a Paris subway train.
    More Details Hide Details On September 8, nine days after her disappearance, her decomposing body was found wrapped in a blanket in the back seat of her Renault, parked close to her Paris apartment in the 16th arrondissement. Police found a bottle of barbiturates, an empty mineral water bottle and a note written in French from Seberg addressed to her son. It read, in part, "Forgive me. I can no longer live with my nerves." Her death was ruled a suicide by the police. Romain Gary, Seberg's second husband, called a press conference shortly after her death where he publicly blamed the FBI's campaign against Seberg for her deteriorating mental health. Gary claimed that Seberg "became psychotic" after the media reported a false story that the FBI planted about her becoming pregnant with a Black Panther's child in 1970. Gary stated that Seberg had repeatedly attempted suicide on the anniversary of the child's death, August 25.
    On the night of August 30, 1979, Seberg mysteriously disappeared.
    More Details Hide Details Her partner Ahmed Hasni told police that they had gone to a movie that night and when he awoke the next morning, Seberg was gone. After Seberg went missing, Hasni told police that he had known she was suicidal for some time.
    In 1979, while separated from her legally-wed husband, Seberg went through "a form of marriage" to an Algerian named Ahmed Hasni.
    More Details Hide Details Hasni persuaded her to sell her second apartment on the Rue du Bac, and he kept the proceeds (reportedly 11 million francs in cash), announcing that he would use the money to open a Barcelona restaurant. The couple departed for Spain but she was soon back in Paris alone, and went into hiding from Hasni, who she said had grievously abused her.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1972
    Age 33
    In 1972, she was married for the third time, to aspiring film director Dennis Berry.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1970
    Age 31
    Seberg went into premature labor and, on August 23, 1970, gave birth to a baby girl.
    More Details Hide Details The child died two days later. She held a funeral in her hometown with an open casket that allowed reporters to see the infant's white skin, which disproved the rumors. Seberg and Gary later sued Newsweek for libel and defamation and asked for US$200,000 in damages. Seberg contended she became so upset after reading the story, that she went into premature labor, which resulted in the death of her daughter. A Paris court ordered Newsweek to pay the couple US$10,800 in damages and also ordered Newsweek to print the judgment in their publication, plus eight other newspapers. The investigation of Seberg went far beyond the publishing of defamatory articles. According to her friends interviewed after her death, Seberg experienced years of aggressive in-person surveillance (constant stalking), as well as break-ins and other intimidation-oriented activity. These newspaper reports make clear that Seberg was well aware of the surveillance. FBI files show that she was wiretapped, and in 1980, the Los Angeles Times published logs of her Swiss wiretapped phone calls. U.S. surveillance was deployed while she was residing in France and while travelling in Switzerland and Italy. Per FBI files the FBI cross-contacted the "FBI Legat" (legal attachés) in U.S. Embassies in Paris and Rome and provided files on Seberg to the CIA, U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Military intelligence to assist monitoring while she was abroad.
    In 1970, the FBI created the false story, from a San Francisco-based informant, that the child Seberg was carrying was not fathered by her husband Romain Gary but by Raymond Hewitt, a member of the Black Panther Party.
    More Details Hide Details The story was reported by gossip columnist Joyce Haber of the Los Angeles Times, and was also printed by Newsweek magazine.
  • 1969
    Age 30
    In 1969, she appeared in her first and only musical film, Paint Your Wagon, based on Lerner and Loewe's stage musical, and co-starring Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood.
    More Details Hide Details Her singing voice was dubbed by Anita Gordon. Seberg also starred in the disaster film Airport (1970) opposite Burt Lancaster and Dean Martin. Seberg was François Truffaut's first choice for the central role of Julie in Day for Night but, after several fruitless attempts to contact her, Truffaut gave up and cast British actress Jacqueline Bisset instead. Her last US film appearance was in the TV movie Mousey (1974). Seberg remained active during the 1970s in European films. She appeared in Bianchi cavalli d'Agosto (White Horses of Summer) (1975), Le Grand Délire (Die Große Ekstase) (1975, with husband Dennis Berry) and Die Wildente (1976, based on Ibsen's The Wild Duck). At the time of her death she was working on the French film La Légion saute sur Kolwezi. She had scenes filmed in French Guiana and returned to Paris for additional work in September. After her death, the scenes were reshot with actress Mimsy Farmer.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1968
    Age 29
    Jean had a sister Mary-Ann, a brother Kurt, and a brother David, who was killed in a car accident in 1968.
    More Details Hide Details After high school, Seberg enrolled at the University of Iowa to study dramatic arts, but took up movie making instead.
  • 1962
    Age 23
    Gary's divorce from his first wife took place on September 5, 1962, and he married Seberg on October 6. The marriage in Corsica was secret and used accommodations with the law. Their only child together, Alexandre Diego Gary, was born in Barcelona on July 24, 1962; for this, Diego's birth and first years of life were hidden from even Gary's closest friends and relatives. Thanks to his contacts in the diplomat services, Gary "established" Diego's birth at the French village of Charquemont on October 26, 1963, after his parents' marriage.
    More Details Hide Details During her marriage to Gary, Seberg lived in Paris, Greece, Southern France and Majorca. Diego married and as of 2009 resides in Spain where he runs a bookstore and oversees his father's literary and real estate holdings. Seberg's second child, Nina Hart Gary (born August 23, 1970 - died August 25, 1970, buried at Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown, Iowa) was acknowledged by Gary as his own, but the child was actually the product of an affair with a student revolutionary named Carlos Ornelas Navarra.
    Despite extended stays in the United States, Seberg remained Paris-based for the rest of her life. In 1962, she married French aviator, resistant, novelist and diplomat Romain Gary, who was 24 years her senior and was previously married.
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  • 1961
    Age 22
    In 1961, Seberg took on the lead role in her then-husband François Moreuil's directorial debut, La recréation.
    More Details Hide Details By that time, Seberg had been estranged from Moreuil, and she recollected that production was "pure hell" and that he "would scream at her." In the United States, she starred opposite Warren Beatty in Lilith (1964), which prompted the critics to acknowledge Seberg as a serious actress.
  • 1960
    Age 21
    Most notably, she appeared in 1960 as Patricia in Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (French title: À bout de souffle), in which she co-starred with Jean-Paul Belmondo.
    More Details Hide Details The film became an international success and critics praised Seberg's performance, François Truffaut even hailing her "the best actress in Europe". Despite her achievements in this genre, Seberg did not identify with her characters or the film plots, saying that she was "making films in France about people she's not really interested in." The critics did not agree with Seberg's absence of enthusiasm, and raved about her performances, inspiring Hollywood and Broadway to make her important offers.
  • 1959
    Age 20
    But her next role was in the successful 1959 comedy, The Mouse That Roared, starring Peter Sellers.
    More Details Hide Details During the filming of Bonjour Tristesse Seberg met François Moreuil, the man who was to be her first husband, and she then based herself in France, achieving success as the free-love heroine of French New Wave films.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1958
    Age 19
    On September 5, 1958, Seberg married François Moreuil, a French lawyer, age 23, in Marshalltown after having met in France 15 months earlier. They divorced in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details Moreuil had ambitions in movies and directed his estranged wife in "La récréation". According to Seberg, the marriage was a "violent" one; and she complained that she "got married for all the wrong reasons." On living in France for a period of time, Seberg said in an interview: I'm enjoying it to the fullest extent. I've been tremendously lucky to have gone through this experience at an age where I can still learn. That doesn't mean that I will stay here. I'm in Paris because my work has been here. I'm not an expatriate. I will go where the work is. The French life has its drawbacks. One of them is the formality. The system seems to be based on saving the maximum of yourself for those nearest you. Perhaps that is better than the other extreme in Hollywood, where people give so much of themselves in public life that they have nothing left over for their families. Still, it is hard for an American to get used to. Often I will get excited over a luncheon table only to have the hostess say discreetly that coffee will be served in the other room. I miss that casualness and friendliness of Americans, the kind that makes people smile. I also miss blue jeans, milk shakes, thick steaks and supermarkets.
  • 1957
    Age 18
    Seberg made her film debut in 1957 in the title role of Saint Joan, from the George Bernard Shaw play, after being chosen from 18,000 hopefuls by director Otto Preminger in a $150,000 talent search.
    More Details Hide Details Her name was entered by a neighbor.
  • 1956
    Age 17
    When she was cast, on October 21, 1956, her only acting experience had been a single season of summer stock performances.
    More Details Hide Details The film was associated with a great deal of publicity about which Seberg commented that she was "embarrassed by all the attention". Despite a big build-up, called in the press a "Pygmalion experiment", both the film and Seberg received poor notices. On the failure, she later told the press: I have two memories of Saint Joan. The first was being burned at the stake in the picture. The second was being burned at the stake by the critics. The latter hurt more. I was scared like a rabbit and it showed on the screen. It was not a good experience at all. I started where most actresses end up. Preminger, though, had promised her a second chance, and he cast Seberg in his next film Bonjour Tristesse the following year, which was filmed in France. Regarding his decision, Preminger told the press: "It's quite true that, if I had chosen Audrey Hepburn instead of Jean Seberg, it would have been less of a risk, but I prefer to take the risk. I have faith in her. Sure, she still has things to learn about acting, but so did Kim Novak when she started." Seberg again received atrocious reviews and the film nearly ended her career.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1938
    Born
    Born on November 13, 1938.
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