Jeanne Eagels
Actress
Jeanne Eagels
Jeanne Eagels was an American actress on Broadway and in several motion pictures. She was a former Ziegfeld Follies Girl who went on to greater fame on Broadway and in the emerging medium of sound films. She was posthumously considered for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her 1929 role in The Letter after dying suddenly that year at the age of 39. That nomination was the first posthumous Oscar consideration for any actor, male or female.
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Video: 'September 11th: Memorial Edition,' 'The Letter' and more - ScrippsNews
Google News - over 5 years
Made in 1929, it stars stage actress Jeanne Eagels, in her only surviving talkie performance, as a married woman who kills her lover, then goes on trial and says that the man tried to rape her. Eagels is astounding. Notice her concentration, how she is
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VIDEO; A Tragic Actress's Twilight, Burning, Not Dimming
NYTimes - over 5 years
The Letter Long overshadowed by William Wyler's 1940 remake starring Bette Davis, the first filming, from 1929, of W. Somerset Maugham's stage play ''The Letter'' has re-emerged, thanks to a new DVD edition from Warner Archive. As the only surviving sound film of the radically innovative Broadway star Jeanne Eagels, the film is an important piece
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Hollywood Auction Ends Myth of Zaftig Marilyn: Virginia Postrel - Bloomberg
Google News - over 5 years
Sharing a rotating mirrored platform with Hedy Lamarr's peacock gown from “Samson and Delilah” and Kim Novak's rhinestone- fringed show dress from “Jeanne Eagels,” Monroe's costume was displayed on a mannequin that had been carved down from a standard
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DVD Extra: Sony's MOD -- Madman, madwoman, musical remakes - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The biggest pre-code rarity today is Jean de Limur and Monta Bell's 1929 version of "The Letter,'' the only surviving talkie starring legendary stage star Jeanne Eagels. Co-starring Herbert Marshall -- who played the husband in William Wyler's
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Film Review: Beautiful Darling - Film Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
... the ever-somnambulistic Novak, ever was, and Darling also proves herself a delightful mimic here, doing Novak in her most stonily impassioned onscreen moments, in Picnic and as Jeanne Eagels, in which the histrionically limited Novak was bizarrely
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DVDS; How Kim Novak Mixed Glamour With Gutsy
NYTimes - over 6 years
BY the time Marilyn Pauline Novak arrived in Hollywood in 1953, the industry's once highly efficient star-making machinery was beginning to break down. A former model whose hourglass figure had earned her a walk-on in the Jane Russell musical ''The French Line,'' Ms. Novak was recruited by Columbia Pictures to be groomed as its answer to Marilyn
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THE LISTINGS
NYTimes - over 8 years
MOVIES Ratings and running times are in parentheses; foreign films have English subtitles. Full reviews of all current releases, movie trailers, showtimes and tickets: nytimes.com/movies. 'BABYLON A.D.' (PG-13, 1:30) Mathieu Kassovitz, the director of this futuristic action movie, has described it as ''pure violence and stupidity,'' but that makes
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Corrections
NYTimes - about 10 years
An article last Sunday about films made from works by W. Somerset Maugham referred incorrectly to the 1940 film ''The Letter.'' The play of the same name was adapted for film several times before, most notably in a 1929 movie starring Jeanne Eagels. The 1940 ''Letter,'' starring Bette Davis, was not the original big-screen version.
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FILM; Another Encore for the Most Adaptable of Authors
NYTimes - about 10 years
IF there were a prize for authors who have had the most movies made from their work, W. Somerset Maugham would be at or near the top of the list. Jeffrey Meyers, Maugham's latest biographer, counts 48 Maugham-based movies, and that's not including made-for-TV movies or foreign films, in which case the total runs into the hundreds. Maugham himself
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Access Hollywood
NYTimes - over 11 years
THE GOLDEN WEST Hollywood Stories. By Daniel Fuchs. Selected by Christopher Carduff. Introduction by John Updike. 256 pp. A Black Sparrow Book/ David R. Godine. $24.95. This superb collection of Daniel Fuchs's fiction and essays about Hollywood, spanning half a century, records the vagaries of the film industry from the perspective of a
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; A Truly Famous Unknown Writer
NYTimes - almost 15 years
THE JOHN FANTE READER Edited by Stephen Cooper 324 pages. William Morrow. $25.95. Either the work of John Fante (1909-1983) is unknown to you or it is unforgettable. He was not the kind of writer to leave room in between. That is because of what his biographer, Stephen Cooper, has called ''a style of deceptive simplicity, emotional immediacy and
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Movie Guide
NYTimes - over 19 years
Here is a selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy movies and film series playing this weekend in New York City. * denotes a highly recommended film or series. Running times and ratings of films are in parentheses. An index of reviews of films opening today appears on page 10. Now Playing * ''BOOGIE NIGHTS,'' starring Mark
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Movie Guide
NYTimes - over 19 years
Here is a selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy movies and film series playing this weekend in New York City. * denotes a highly recommended film or series. Running times and ratings of films are in parentheses. An index of reviews of films opening today appears on page 10. Now Playing * ''BOOGIE NIGHTS,'' starring Mark
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Not Some Brainless Beauty
NYTimes - about 21 years
LOOKING FOR GATSBY My Life. By Faye Dunaway with Betsy Sharkey. Illustrated. 416 pp. New York: Simon & Schuster. $25. THAT spark of energy," writes Faye Dunaway in "Looking for Gatsby." "Life and breath as well as flesh and bone. A young acting colleague at Boston University called it 'the shine.' . . . People said I had the shine." She has the
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Daniel Fuchs, Novelist And Screenwriter, 84
NYTimes - over 23 years
Daniel Fuchs, who won an Academy Award as a screenwriter and acclaim for a trilogy of novels about his Brooklyn childhood, died on July 26 at his home here. He was 84. His son Thomas said on Monday that the cause was heart failure. Mr. Fuchs won the Oscar for best original story for the 1955 film "Love Me or Leave Me," which starred Doris Day as
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THEATER; Examining The Life Once Led By a Critic
NYTimes - over 24 years
ONE ought to get a kick out of whiling away a couple of hours with a critic who swam in the nude with George Bernard Shaw, made love to Jeanne Eagels, socialized with Eugene O'Neill, wrote the biography of George M. Cohan and lived in the torch of the Statue of Liberty, rent free. But don't bet on it. The reminiscences of Ward Morehouse (1899-1966)
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FILM; Once Again, Ready on the Set For Kim Novak
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: It was the fizzy 50's in Hollywood, the era of Hedda Hopper and Louella Parsons, pouty starlets in strapless evening gowns, and industry kingpins in rumpled suits. Harry Cohn ruled the roost at Columbia Pictures, where Rita Hayworth was the resident love goddess. But all was not quiet in the hallowed executive suites. It was the fizzy 50's in
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GOING OUT GUIDE
NYTimes - over 31 years
ALL'S FAIR Twenty years after the 1964-65 New York World's Fair played Flushing Meadow Park, shades of the big exposition are once again in public view in nearby Flushing, Queens. ''The Mighty Fair'' is a large exhibition in a small space that displays artifacts, photos, documents and a videotape that will recall great sights and events of the
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HOME VIDEO; NEW CASSETTES: MAUGHAM, A MUSICAL AND BOB MARLEY
NYTimes - over 32 years
The Letter Starring Bette Davis, Herbert Marshall, James Stephenson, Sen Yung, Gale Sondergaard; directed by William Wyler, 1940 Key Video 96 minutes. $59.98 Here is early Bette Davis at her peak and a brilliantly crafted adult drama of adulterous murder and retribution in bygone British colonial Malaysia. It's also a nasty can of worms, involving
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jeanne Eagels
    THIRTIES
  • 1929
    Age 34
    On October 3, 1929, Eagels and her secretary walked to the Park Avenue Hospital where Eagels had an appointment.
    More Details Hide Details While talking to the doctor, she began having convulsions and died shortly thereafter. The assistant chief medical examiner who performed Eagels' autopsy concluded that she died of "alcoholic psychosis". The medical examiner stated that while Eagels had not consumed alcohol in the two days preceding her death, she had been "acting strangely" and suffering from hallucinations three or four days before she died. Toxicology reports revealed that Eagels still had alcohol in her organs when she died in addition to heroin and chloral hydrate (a sedative that Eagels regularly took to sleep). Her death was attributed to an overdose of the chloral hydrate. After services in New York at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel, Eagels received a second funeral service when her body was returned to Kansas City on October 7, where she was buried in Calvary Cemetery. She was survived by her mother Julia Eagles and several brothers and sisters.
    In September 1929, Eagels underwent eye surgery at St. Luke's Hospital in New York City.
    More Details Hide Details At the time, she was also suffering from breathing problems and neuritis. After a ten-day stay, she returned to her apartment on Park Avenue.
    She was posthumously considered for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her 1929 role in The Letter after dying suddenly that year at the age of 39.
    More Details Hide Details That nomination was the first posthumous Oscar consideration for any actor, male or female. Eugenia Eagles was the second of six children born to Edward, of German and French Huguenot descent, and his wife Julia Eagles (née Sullivan), who was of Irish descent. Jeanne, who later changed the spelling of her surname to "Eagels", would later claim that her father was a Spanish architect and she was born in Boston. In reality, she was born in Kansas City, Missouri and her father was a carpenter. Edward Eagles died in February 1910. Eagels attended St. Joseph's Catholic School and Morris Public School. She quit school shortly after her First Communion to work as a cash girl in a department store. Eagels began her acting career in Kansas City, appearing in a variety of small venues at a very young age. She left Kansas City around the age of 15 and toured the Midwest with the Dubinsky Brothers' traveling theater show. At first, she was a dancer, but in time she went on to play the leading lady in several comedies and dramas put on by the Dubinskys. As a teenager, she married Morris Dubinsky, who frequently played villain roles.
  • 1928
    Age 33
    In 1928, after failing to appear for a performance in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Eagels was banned by Actors Equity from appearing on stage for 18 months.
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  • 1927
    Age 32
    After missing some performances due to ptomaine poisoning, Eagels returned to the cast in July 1927 for an Empire Theater show.
    More Details Hide Details After a season on Broadway, she took a break to make a movie. She appeared opposite John Gilbert in the MGM film Man, Woman and Sin (1927), directed by Monta Bell.
  • 1926
    Age 31
    In 1926, Eagels was offered the part of Roxie Hart in Maurine Dallas Watkins's play Chicago, but Eagels walked out of this role during rehearsals.
    More Details Hide Details She next appeared in the comedy Her Cardboard Lover (1927), in which she appeared on stage with Leslie Howard. She then went on tour with Her Cardboard Lover for several months.
    She went on tour with Rain for two more seasons and returned to Broadway to give a farewell performance in 1926.
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  • 1925
    Age 30
    In August 1925, Eagels married Edward Harris "Ted" Coy, a former Yale University football star turned stockbroker. They had no children and divorced in July 1928.
    More Details Hide Details During the peak of her success, Eagels began abusing drugs and alcohol and eventually developed an addiction. She went to several sanitariums in an effort to kick her dependency. By the mid-1920s, she had begun using heroin. When she entered her 30s, Eagels began suffering from bouts of ill health that were exacerbated by her excessive use of drugs and alcohol.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1919
    Age 24
    She appeared in several other Broadway shows between 1919 and 1921.
    More Details Hide Details In 1922, she made her first appearance as a star in the play Rain, by John Colton) and Clemence Randolph, based on a short story by W. Somerset Maugham. Eagels played her favorite role, that of Sadie Thompson, a free-wheeling and free-loving spirit who confronts a fire-and-brimstone preacher on a South Pacific island.
  • 1918
    Age 23
    In 1918, she appeared in Daddies, a David Belasco production.
    More Details Hide Details She quit this show due to illness and subsequently travelled to Europe.
  • 1916
    Age 21
    She also made three films for Thanhouser Film Corporation in 1916-17.
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  • 1915
    Age 20
    In 1915, she appeared in her first motion picture.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1912
    Age 17
    Eagels was in the supporting cast of Mind The Paint Girl at the Lyceum Theatre in September 1912.
    More Details Hide Details Eagels played opposite George Arliss in three successive plays in 1916 and 1917.
  • 1911
    Age 16
    Around 1911, she moved to New York City, working in chorus lines and eventually becoming a Ziegfeld Girl.
    More Details Hide Details Her hair was brown, but she bleached it when she went to New York. During this period, one of her acting coaches was Beverley Sitgreaves.
  • OTHER
  • 1890
    Age -5
    Born on June 26, 1890.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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