Jeff Buckley
Singer-songwriter and guitarist
Jeff Buckley
Jeffrey Scott "Jeff" Buckley, raised as Scotty Moorhead, was an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. He was the son of Tim Buckley, also a musician. After a decade as a guitarist-for-hire in Los Angeles, Buckley amassed a following in the early 1990s by playing cover songs at venues in Manhattan's East Village, such as Sin-é, gradually focusing more on his own material.
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Ashley Greene Recalls Shakespearean Memories As Banners Premieres 'Holy Ground' Music Video
Huffington Post - 25 days
BANNERS just dropped his music video for “Holy Ground,” and it is amazing. It features Ashley Greene, widely known for playing Alice Cullen in the “Twilight” franchise, in her stunning music video debut that will surely get everybody talking. How did this dream collaboration come together? “Honestly, I heard of BANNERS from the soundtrack for ‘The Royals.’ ‘The Royals’ is kind of my guilty pleasure,” Greene laughed. She continued, “One of my girlfriends ended up meeting him. Somehow or another, I had a barbecue and he was there. He was talking about all of his songs and we kind of got into a conversation about music videos.” Greene said that the sound BANNERS creates reminds her of a very specific William Shakespeare play. “I felt this connection to his music. It was deep and romantic. His music, it sounds weird to say—kind of reminds me of ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ There was this push and pull,” she elaborated. It was a no-brainer for Greene to sign on to this s ...
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Huffington Post article
'Leaving The Table'--A Eulogy For Leonard Cohen
Huffington Post - 3 months
I have to etch these words into my memory forever, while they are still fresh, while I am still stunned, while I am still reeling: Leonard Cohen has passed away, aged 82 years. His music is playing on a loop in my room as I write this, his words are playing on a loop in my mind. I find myself suddenly making frantic online purchases of live Cohen recordings on vinyl--1970's landmark Isle of Wight album, Field Commander Cohen dating from his 1979 tour, and a 1988 concert from one of my favorite venues (Toronto's Massey Hall). Undoubtedly, there are millions of people all around the world who are feeling his loss. Perhaps they knew him personally during the early days in Montreal. Or they could have crossed paths with him in New York City at the Chelsea Hotel. Maybe there's a Greek family living in his old house on the island of Hydra, who could regale visitors with anecdotes left in its dusty corners. Maybe there's a woman in England who owns everything he's written--all the po ...
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Without Further Ado, Here Is Every Cover Of Leonard Cohen's 'Hallelujah' We Could Find
Huffington Post - 3 months
We know there is a secret chord that every musician in the whole wide world has played, and it pleases us all. Or rather, chords. More specifically, the chords that make up “Hallelujah” by Leonard Cohen, whose death was announced via Facebook on Thursday. And actually, some renditions might please us more than others.  More famous than the original is Jeff Buckley’s version, an emotional take whose quiet intensity most artists find themselves trying to imitate. It’s perhaps most closely followed by Rufus Wainwright’s version, which appeared on the soundtrack to millennial favorite “Shrek.” K.D. Lang has covered the song, as has Neil Diamond, Bon Jovi, several contenders on “The Voice,” more than a few (very impressive) a cappella groups and dozens of other instrumentalists and vocalists alike. Below we’ve compiled a Spotify playlist with 141 versions of the song after Cohen’s original. That’s 10-and-a-half hours of “Hallelujah,” plus a few YouTube videos for good measure. Enjoy ...
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Smooth, Complex, Potent: Nederlands Dans Theater
NYTimes - 3 months
The troupe moves to sounds as varied as Bach and Jeff Buckley at New York city Center.
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NYTimes article
A-Sides with Jon Chattman: Pop Icon Howard Jones "Only Gets Better"; Hannah Gill & The Hours Clock In
Huffington Post - 7 months
This summer, decades are colliding. The "whoa whoa whoa-oh-oh whoa-whoa whoa-oh-oh" is meeting "Chickity China the Chinese chicken" and shouting "oho Enola gay." Yep, 1980s synth icon Howard Jones is on the road with '90's standouts Barenaked Ladies and '80s stars OMD. That said, let's focus on Mr. Jones, who revolutionized synth music in the Reagan decade, and in turn inspired countless contemporary acts with his cutting edge ways. And, it's important to note, Jones has been churning out music long after "Things Can Only Get Better" and "No One is to Blame" burned up the charts. Never just a novelty act, the musician has toured rigorously over three decades, and released new material - most notably the multi-media project Engage. At the Music Conservatory of Westchester late last month, Jones talked about the '80's (and the bad rap it gets), his current tour stateside, and his influence in the industry. Oh, and he also performed a rare, mostly instrumental version of his song "Don ...
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Early Jeff Buckley recordings depict struggle, not genius
Chicago Times - 12 months
When Jeff Buckley drowned in the Mississippi River in 1997 at age 30, he was still something of a musical phantom, represented by one indelible studio album, "Grace," and a live EP. His you-had-to-be-there live performances suggested those recordings had only scraped the surface of his talent. ...
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Chicago Times article
First Listen: Jeff Buckley, 'You And I'
NPR - 12 months
Newly unearthed from early in Buckley's career, these 1993 demos find the late singer covering Bob Dylan, Sly Stone, The Smiths, Led Zeppelin and more.
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NPR article
15 Albums We're Ridiculously Excited About In 2016
Huffington Post - about 1 year
In 2016, David Bowie released his last album ever, professional hit-maker Sia stopped dropping individual tracks to put out her whole album, someone named Zayn announced some new something and, after teasing fans for months upon months, Rihanna finally got around to giving us "ANTI-."  And it's only Feb. 1.  We're not sure what to exactly expect from our artists in the 11 remaining months of the year. Managers and producers tend to keep those cards pretty close to the chest. But there are some records that have us awfully excited. Fifteen, to be exact:   Lady Gaga, TBD Why we're excited: Elton John is on board for this one After releasing the underwhelming "Artpop" in 2013 and then taking a hard left into Tony Bennett territory with 2014's "Cheek to Cheek," nobody knows what direction Gaga will go in 2016. Here’s what we have nailed down: She's reuniting with RedOne, her co-writer responsible for early career hits like "Poker Face," and Elton John is also on bo ...
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Songs We Love: Jeff Buckley, 'Just Like A Woman'
NPR - about 1 year
Recorded in early 1993, Buckley's Bob Dylan cover rambles swoonily for six and a half minutes, capturing both a gift for interpretation and a willingness to let songs unfurl slowly and delicately.
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NPR article
On the Culture Front: Music From the Underground, Part Three
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Album art by Austin Hinderliter Nashville-bred musician Billy Crain is the consummate sideman who can effortlessly pick up a guitar and jump into many styles. He's shared the stage with the Rolling Stones and Allman Brothers band but also the Dixie Chicks, for whom he co-wrote "Let 'Er Rip." His bio speaks more to his humanitarian efforts and the children he's fostered, so "Family Matters," his new solo album, feels less like a generic platitude than a creed that he lives by. He plays all the instruments, which include plenty of guitars and more than a couple rollicking piano solos. The latter made me think of the Band and the way Rick Danko poured his soul into each and every black and white key on his Hammond organ. The album kicks off with a festively melodic riff on "Dark Horse" reminiscent of the Pogues and ends with an epic chord progression on "1928" that made me think of Billy Joel's "Movin' Out." In between there are bits of country twang, straight-ahead rock phrasing and ...
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On the Culture Front: Music from the Underground, Part Two
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Midwest Soul Xchange, photo by Michael Patrick Neary Midwest Soul Xchange have an alternative Americana vibe that's reminiscent of The Decemberists - big twangy folk that appears to have emerged from a time capsule. Their newly released album, New American Century, sounds like it was created by a band of musicians, but the Wisconsin-bred duo of Ryan Summers and Nate Cherrier are the sole members of this exciting new project that blends banjos, acoustic guitars and other rootsy instruments with an array of synth sounds. There are moments when the vocals creep to a James Hetfield roar, and this feels like a stylistic misstep, but the majority of the album benefits from a wide influence of genres. "Revolt of the Guards" is the most overtly political track, bringing to mind Tom Morello's Woody Guthrie odes. "The terror of poverty is now a crime," Summers and Cherrier croon blatantly on it. "Four Score and Seven to Go" is their most anthemic song on an impressive debut that skews toward ...
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Huffington Post article
On the Culture Front: Music from the Underground, Part Two
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Midwest Soul Xchange, photo by Michael Patrick Neary Midwest Soul Xchange have an alternative Americana vibe that's reminiscent of The Decemberists - big twangy folk that appears to have emerged from a time capsule. Their newly released album, New American Century, sounds like it was created by a band of musicians, but the Wisconsin-bred duo of Ryan Summers and Nate Cherrier are the sole members of this exciting new project that blends banjos, acoustic guitars and other rootsy instruments with an array of synth sounds. There are moments when the vocals creep to a James Hetfield roar, and this feels like a stylistic misstep, but the majority of the album benefits from a wide influence of genres. "Revolt of the Guards" is the most overtly political track, bringing to mind Tom Morello's Woody Guthrie odes. "The terror of poverty is now a crime," Summers and Cherrier croon blatantly on it. "Four Score and Seven to Go" is their most anthemic song on an impressive debut that skews toward ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jeff Buckley
    TWENTIES
  • 1997
    In 1997, Buckley moved to Memphis, Tennessee, to resume work on the album, to be titled My Sweetheart the Drunk, recording many four-track demos while also playing weekly solo shows at a local venue.
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    On the evening of May 29, 1997, Buckley's band flew to Memphis intending to join him in his studio there to work on the newly written material.
    More Details Hide Details The same evening, Buckley went swimming in Wolf River Harbor, a slack water channel of the Mississippi River, while wearing boots and all of his clothing and singing the chorus of the song "Whole Lotta Love" by Led Zeppelin. Buckley had gone swimming there several times before. A roadie in Buckley's band, Keith Foti, remained onshore. After moving a radio and guitar out of reach of the wake from a passing tugboat, Foti looked up to see that Buckley had vanished. Despite a determined rescue effort that night, Buckley remained missing. On June 4, two locals spotted his body in the Wolf River near a riverboat, and he was brought to land. Buckley's autopsy showed no signs of drugs or alcohol in his system, and the death was ruled as an accidental drowning. The following statement was released from the Buckley estate:
    Throughout this period, February 12 to May 26, 1997, Buckley played at Barristers', a bar located in downtown Memphis underneath a parking garage in an alley off of Jefferson Avenue.
    More Details Hide Details He played numerous times in order to work through the new material in a live atmosphere, at first with the band then solo as part of a Monday night residency. In early February, Buckley and the band did a third recording session with Verlaine, in Memphis, but Buckley expressed his dissatisfaction with the sessions and later called Grace producer, Andy Wallace, to step in as Verlaine's replacement. Buckley started recording demos on his own 4-track recorder in preparation for a forthcoming session with Wallace. Some of these demos were sent to his band in New York, who listened to them enthusiastically, and were excited to resume working on the album. These recordings would go on to compose the second disc of Sketches for My Sweetheart the Drunk. However Buckley was not entirely happy with the results and he sent his band back to New York while he stayed behind to work on the songs. The band was scheduled to return to Memphis for rehearsals and recording sessions on May 29.
    On February 4, 1997, Buckley played a short set at The Knitting Factory's tenth anniversary concert featuring a selection of his new songs: "Jewel Box", "Morning Theft", "Everybody Here Wants You", "The Sky is a Landfill" and "Yard of Blonde Girls".
    More Details Hide Details Lou Reed was there to watch and expressed an interest in working with Buckley. The band played their first gig with Parker Kindred, their new drummer, at Arlene's Grocery in New York on February 9. The set featured much of Buckley's new material that would appear on Sketches for My Sweetheart the Drunk and a recording has become one of Buckley's most widely distributed bootlegs. Later that month, Buckley recorded a spoken word reading of the Edgar Allan Poe poem, "Ulalume", for the album Closed on Account of Rabies. This would be his last recording in New York; shortly after, he moved to Memphis, Tennessee. Buckley became interested in recording at Easley McCain Recording in Memphis, at the suggestion of friend Dave Shouse from the Grifters. He rented a shotgun house there, of which he was so fond he contacted the owner about the possibility of buying it.
    Another recording session in Manhattan followed in early 1997, but Buckley and the band were unsatisfied, and the album was not considered finished.
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  • 1996
    In the middle of 1996, Buckley and his band began recording sessions in Manhattan with Verlaine.
    More Details Hide Details Eric Eidel played the drums through these sessions as a stop-gap between the dates drummer Matt Johnson left and before Parker Kindred joined as full-time drummer. Around this time Buckley met Inger Lorre of The Nymphs in an East Village bar, and struck up a fast and close friendship. Together, they contributed a track to Kerouac: Kicks Joy Darkness, a Jack Kerouac tribute album. After Lorre's backup guitarist for an upcoming album quit the project, Buckley offered to fill in. He became very attached to one of the songs from the album, "Yard of Blonde Girls", and covered it on Sketches for My Sweetheart the Drunk.
    Buckley worked with Patti Smith on her 1996 album Gone Again and met collaborator Tom Verlaine, the lead singer for the punk band Television.
    More Details Hide Details Buckley asked Verlaine to be producer on the new album and he agreed.
    After completing touring in 1996, Buckley started to write for a new album to be called My Sweetheart the Drunk.
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    Buckley returned to playing live concerts when he went on his "phantom solo tour" of cafés in the Northeast in December 1996, appearing under a series of aliases: the Crackrobats, Possessed by Elves, Father Demo, Smackrobiotic, the Halfspeeds, Crit-Club, Topless America, Martha & the Nicotines, and A Puppet Show Named Julio.
    More Details Hide Details By way of justification, Buckley posted a note on his Internet site stating that he missed the anonymity of playing in cafes and local bars:
    The concert on March 1, 1996 was the last gig he played with Buckley and his band.
    More Details Hide Details Much of the material from the tours of 1995 and 1996 was recorded and released on either promotional EPs, such as the Grace EP, or posthumously on albums, such as Mystery White Boy (a reference to Buckley not using his real name) and Live a L'Olympia. Many of the other concerts Buckley played during this period have surfaced on bootleg recordings. Following Johnson's departure, the band, now without a drummer, was put on hold and did not perform live again until February 12, 1997. Due to the pressure from extensive touring, Buckley spent the majority of the year away from the stage. However, from May 2 to May 5, he played a short stint as bass guitarist with Mind Science of the Mind, with friend Nathan Larson, then guitarist of Shudder to Think.
  • 1994
    Following Buckley's Peyote Radio Theater tour, the band began a European tour on August 23, 1994, starting with performances in the UK and Ireland.
    More Details Hide Details The tour continued in Scandinavia and, throughout September, numerous concerts in Germany were played. The tour ended on September 22 with a concert in Paris. A gig on September 24 in New York dovetailed on to the end of the European tour and Buckley and band spent the next month relaxing and rehearsing. A tour of Canada and the US began on October 19, 1994 at CBGB's. The tour was far reaching with concerts held on both East and West Coasts of the US and a number of performances in central and southern states. The tour ended two months later on December 18 at Maxwell's in New Jersey. After another month of rest and rehearsal, the band commenced a second European tour, this time mainly for promotion purposes. The band began the tour in Dublin; Buckley has remained particularly popular in Ireland. The short tour largely consisted of promotional work in London and Paris.
    In January 1994, Buckley left to go on his first solo North American tour to support Live at Sin-é.
    More Details Hide Details It was followed by a 10-day European tour in March. Buckley played clubs and coffeehouses and made in-store appearances. After returning, Buckley invited guitarist Michael Tighe to join the band and a collaboration between the two resulted in "So Real", a song which was recorded with producer / engineer Clif Norrell as a late addition to the album. In June, Buckley began his first full band tour called the "Peyote Radio Theatre Tour" that lasted into August. Pretender Chrissie Hynde, Soundgarden's Chris Cornell, and The Edge from U2 were among the attendees of these early shows. Grace was released on August 23, 1994. In addition to seven original songs, the album included three covers: "Lilac Wine", based on the version by Nina Simone; made famous by Elkie Brooks, "Corpus Christi Carol", from Benjamin Britten's A Boy was Born, Op.3, a composition that Buckley was introduced to in high school, based on a 15th-century hymn; and "Hallelujah" by Leonard Cohen, based on John Cale's recording from the Cohen tribute album, I'm Your Fan. Buckley's rendition of "Hallelujah" has been called "Buckley's best" and "one of the great songs" by Time, and is included on Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".
  • 1993
    In mid-1993, Buckley began working on his first album with record producer Andy Wallace.
    More Details Hide Details Buckley assembled a band, composed of bassist Mick Grøndahl and drummer Matt Johnson, and spent several weeks rehearsing. In September, the trio headed to Bearsville Studios in Woodstock, New York to spend six weeks recording basic tracks for what would become Grace. Buckley invited ex-bandmate Lucas to play guitar on the songs "Grace" and "Mojo Pin", and Woodstock-based jazz musician Karl Berger wrote and conducted string arrangements with Buckley assisting at times. Buckley returned home for overdubbing at studios in Manhattan and New Jersey where he performed take after take to capture the perfect vocals and experimented with ideas for additional instruments, and added textures to the songs.
    Live at Sin-é was released on November 23, 1993, documenting this period of Buckley's life.
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    Recording dates were set for July and August 1993 for what would become Buckley's recording debut, an EP of four songs which included a cover of Van Morrison's "The Way Young Lovers Do".
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    Buckley spent three days in February 1993 in the studio with engineer Steve Addabbo and Columbia A&R man, Steve Berkowitz, recording much of Buckley's solo repertoire.
    More Details Hide Details Buckley sang a cappella and also accompanied himself on acoustic and electric guitars, Wurlitzer electric piano, and harmonium. Much of this material (not recordings) later surfaced on the "Grace" album. These tapes remain unreleased in the Columbia vaults.
  • 1992
    Buckley signed with Columbia Records, home of Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, for a three-album, essentially million-dollar deal in October 1992.
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    Buckley began performing at several clubs and cafés around Lower Manhattan, but Sin-é in the East Village became his main venue. Buckley first appeared at the small Irish café in April 1992, and quickly earned a regular Monday night slot there.
    More Details Hide Details His repertoire consisted of a diverse range of folk, rock, R&B, blues and jazz cover songs, much of it music he had newly learned. During this period, he discovered singers such as Nina Simone, Billie Holiday, Van Morrison, and Judy Garland. Buckley performed an eclectic selection of covers from a range of artists from Led Zeppelin, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Bob Dylan, Édith Piaf, Elton John, The Smiths, Bad Brains, Leonard Cohen, Robert Johnson and Siouxsie Sioux. Original songs from the Babylon Dungeon Sessions, and the songs he'd written with Gary Lucas were also included in his set lists. He performed solo, accompanying himself on a borrowed Fender Telecaster. Buckley stated that he learned how to perform onstage from playing to small audiences. Over the next few months, Buckley attracted admiring crowds and attention from record label executives. Industry maven Clive Davis even dropped by to see him. By the summer of 1992, limos from executives eager to sign the singer lined the street outside Sin-é.
    The day after Gods and Monsters officially debuted in March 1992, Buckley decided to leave the band.
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  • 1991
    After being offered a development deal as a member of Gods and Monsters at Imago Records, Buckley moved back to New York to the Lower East Side at the end of 1991.
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    On subsequent trips to New York in mid-1991, Buckley began co-writing with Gary Lucas resulting in the songs "Grace" and "Mojo Pin", and by late 1991 he began performing with Lucas' band Gods and Monsters around New York City.
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  • 1990
    He moved to New York City in February 1990, but found few opportunities to work as a musician.
    More Details Hide Details He was introduced to Qawwali, the Sufi devotional music of India and Pakistan, and to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, one of its best-known singers. Buckley was an impassioned fan of Khan, and during what he called his "cafe days," he often covered Khan's songs. In January 1996, he interviewed Khan for Interview and wrote liner notes for Khan's Supreme Collection, Vol. 1 compilation. Buckley also became interested in blues musician Robert Johnson and hardcore punk band Bad Brains during this time. Buckley moved back to Los Angeles in September when his father's former manager, Herb Cohen, offered to help him record his first demo of original songs. Buckley completed Babylon Dungeon Sessions, a four-song cassette that included the songs "Eternal Life", "Unforgiven" (later titled "Last Goodbye"), "Strawberry Street" (a different version of which appears on the Grace Legacy Edition), and punk screamer "Radio". Cohen and Buckley hoped to attract attention from the music industry with the demo tape.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1975
    After his father died of a drug overdose in 1975, he chose to go by Buckley and his real first name, which he found on his birth certificate.
    More Details Hide Details To members of his family he remained "Scottie". Buckley was brought up around music. His mother was a classically trained pianist and cellist. His stepfather introduced him to Led Zeppelin, Queen, Jimi Hendrix, the Who, and Pink Floyd at an early age. Buckley grew up singing around the house and in harmony with his mother, later noting that all his family sang. He began playing guitar at the age of five after discovering an acoustic guitar in his grandmother's closet. Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti was the first album he ever owned; the hard rock band Kiss was also an early favorite. At the age of 12, he decided to become a musician, and received his first electric guitar - a black Les Paul - at the age of 13. He attended Loara High School, and played in the school's jazz band. During this time, he developed an affinity for progressive rock bands such as Rush, Genesis, and Yes, as well as jazz fusion guitarist Al Di Meola.
  • OTHER
  • 1966
    Born on November 17, 1966.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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