Jerry Goldsmith
Jerry goldsmith
Jerry Goldsmith
Jerrald King "Jerry" Goldsmith was an American composer and conductor most known for his work in film and television scoring. He composed scores for such noteworthy films as The Sand Pebbles, Planet of the Apes, Patton, Chinatown, The Wind and the Lion, The Omen, The Boys from Brazil, Alien, Poltergeist, Gremlins, Hoosiers, Total Recall, Basic Instinct, Rudy, Air Force One, L.A. Confidential, Mulan, The Mummy, three Rambo films, and five Star Trek films.
Biography
Jerry Goldsmith's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Jerry Goldsmith from around the web
Donald Trump, New Moves on National Security, and One of Our Oddest Veterans Day Weekends
Huffington Post - 3 months
Is America in eclipse? After a strange Veterans Day weekend, it is decidedly unclear. As I feared for more than a year, a deeply troubled and profoundly perturbed America has fallen through the looking glass into Trumplandia. How different will America be under President Donald Trump? It may be quite a lot, all the way into the fascism that Trump so obviously flirted with throughout his campaign. Or it may be not so much, since Trump seems motivated more by an ethic of success than any coherent ideology. And then there is his erratic nature to consider. As I wrote repeatedly during the campaign, it was Trump's own all too frequently intemperate style that kept him from what could have been a truly substantial victory over a very vulnerable Hillary Clinton. That's why I rated the race as up in the air in my final pre-election column, just as I did all the times when Hillary seemed to have a very large lead. The opportunity for a Trump victory was always obvious; what was not at all ...
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Huffington Post article
John Ford's Greatest Film at 70 (plus <em>In Harm's Way</em> at 50)
Huffington Post - about 1 year
It was 70 years ago this holiday season that the film I think is legendary director John Ford's greatest -- greater even than The Grapes of Wrath or The Searchers -- was released to an American public just a few months removed from the largest war in world history. They Were Expendable is the largely true story of a gallant defeat that set the stage for the victory to come, the last stand of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet in attempting to defend the Philippines in the wake of Japan's devastating attack on Pearl Harbor. The film, which features a host of veterans of the war just past, including director Ford, a Navy captain, and star Robert Montgomery, a Navy commander, focuses on the cockleshell heroes of the PT (patrol torpedo) boats, those speedy plywood vessels which began the war as an untried curiosity and ended it as one of the most glamorous, and perilous, of assignments. As a certain future president found out the hard way. It is also 50 years since In Harm's Way, another Wor ...
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Huffington Post article
John Ford's Greatest Film at 70 (plus In Harm's Way</em> at 50)
Huffington Post - about 1 year
It was 70 years ago this holiday season that the film I think is legendary director John Ford's greatest -- greater even than The Grapes of Wrath or The Searchers -- was released to an American public just a few months removed from the largest war in world history. They Were Expendable is the largely true story of a gallant defeat that set the stage for the victory to come, the last stand of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet in attempting to defend the Philippines in the wake of Japan's devastating attack on Pearl Harbor. The film, which features a host of veterans of the war just past, including director Ford, a Navy captain, and star Robert Montgomery, a Navy commander, focuses on the cockleshell heroes of the PT (patrol torpedo) boats, those speedy plywood vessels which began the war as an untried curiosity and ended it as one of the most glamorous, and perilous, of assignments. As a certain future president found out the hard way. It is also 50 years since In Harm's Way, another World W ...
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Huffington Post article
Mike Ragogna: ASCAP Workshop: Chatting with Richard Bellis, Matthew Margeson, Michael Bearden, & Joe Trapanese, Plus Exclusives by The Grahams and Sweet Relief's Victoria Williams
Huffington Post - over 3 years
ASCAP CELEBRATES 25 YEARS OF FILM SCORING "Our participants come to the Workshop at a critical point in their careers. We identify them just before they launch and provide a training ground for them to hone the skills they will need to succeed. Think of it as a finishing school." - ASCAP's Jennifer Harmon First, here's an introduction from ASCAP's official press release: "The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) hosted its annual Film &amp; Television Scoring Workshop from July 8th - August 1st, 2013, celebrating 25 years since the program first launched in 1988. Founded by composer Fred Karlin, and co-produced with ASCAP's longtime veteran Nancy Knutsen, the Workshop has become one of the most well-respected programs in the world. In 1998, Emmy Award-winning composer Richard Bellis joined the workshop as a mentor and has served in that position for the last 16 years." And discussing the workshop and music in general are Richard Bellis a ...
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Huffington Post article
An All-Star Team Of Baseball Movies
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
The new Jackie Robinson movie, "42," brings big-screen life to such baseball legends as Pee Wee Reese (played by Lucas Black), Ralph Branca (played by Hamish Linklater), Robinson himself (played by Chadwick Boseman) and other members of the 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers. Yet how would Dem Bums fare against an all-star team featuring the likes of Crash Davis, Jimmy Dugan and Benny "The Jet" Rodriguez? Unfortunately, we'll never know. If Hollywood is involved, however, the end result would likely include a slow-motion home run trot and some triumphant music cue from deceased composer Jerry Goldsmith. With "42" out in theaters on Friday, HuffPost Entertainment decide to compile the best fictional baseball characters, by position, in film history. Root for the home team in the comments below (or give these choices the Bronx cheer).
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Huffington Post article
Morgan Glennon: Olympus Has Fallen Composer Trevor Morris Discusses Working on the New Action Thriller
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Trevor Morris knows a thing or two about scoring big, historic moments. From Anne Boleyn's execution on The Tudors to the battling Vikings on History Channel's new series of the same name, Morris has become a go-to for the modern historical tale. Now Morris is moving from composing for Mount Olympus in movies like Immortal to setting the score on the new action thriller Olympus Has Fallen. Unlike some of his other work, Olympus Has Fallen is set in the all-too-present day where shadowy forces conspire to take down the White House. The movie has some serious star power behind it, including stars Gerard Butler, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, and Aaron Eckhart. What was it like going from ancient history to a modern cautionary tale? I caught up with Morris, currently scoring the third season of Showtime's scandalous papal drama The Borgias, to find out what it was like working on Olympus Has Fallen and why audiences are in for a non-stop thrill ride. What drew you to O ...
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Huffington Post article
No Frank Ocean Song In 'Django Unchained'?
Huffington Post - about 4 years
It looks like Frank Ocean didn't make the final cut on the "Django Unchained" soundtrack. The full list of songs on the album was revealed late Wednesday by The Weinstein Company and Loma Vista Recordings, and Ocean's name is nowhere to be found. That's odd, since -- as reported in GQ -- the singer reportedly did write something for the "Django Unchained" soundtrack; whether that song appears in the film and not on the record remains to be seen. While Ocean isn't mentioned in the press release announcing the soundtrack, Rick Ross and John Legend are, and each contributed new songs to the film. Ross' track, called "100 Black Coffins," was produced by Jaime Foxx and can be heard in the new "Django Unchained" trailer. (Watch that explosive clip above.) "I want to thank all the artists who contributed original songs (a first for me) to the picture. Most of these contributions came out of the artists' own inspiration and their illustration of the film's soul is invaluable," Q ...
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Huffington Post article
STAR TREK Composer Joel Goldsmith Dead At 54
Wizbang Pop! - almost 5 years
Joel Goldsmith who composed the heroic and powerful themes for such sci fi landmarks as 350 episodes of STARGATE and STAR TREK: FIRST CONTACT, has died of cancer at the age of 54. He was the son of the Oscar winning composer, Jerry Goldsmith. The two Goldsmith’s rated as two of sci fi TV and cinemas greatest musical composers bar none, where their large and visionary themes seemed as awesome as space itself. Joel Goldsmith always seemed to have an intense love for horror and sci fi cinema, and that love included a long career providing great music to set the mood in both genres of film. STAR TREK really worked as an enterprise on so many levels, and part of it was the excellent music that was an integral part of these classic sci fi landmark shows. Both Jerry Goldsmith and Joel Goldsmith
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Wizbang Pop! article
With Eyes On Oscar, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Gets Pushed Back - We Got This Covered
Google News - over 5 years
Meanwhile to build up tension for the release even more, you can listen here to the score for the film by Spanish composer Alberto Iglesias, which has suitably Euro vibe mixed with a very Chinatown styled Jerry Goldsmith sensibility
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Google News article
What Matters Most (Columbia/Sony) - Winnipeg Free Press
Google News - over 5 years
The material on What Matters Most is focused on love and romance, augmented with orchestral compositions by the likes of John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and Johnny Mandel. Every song is slow and tasteful with Streisand&#39;s still strong voice adding
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Google News article
Hope House holds a night of sharing love - Estes Park Trail-Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Burnham, the inspiration-organizer-emcee for this event, dedicated her solo, the lovely &quot;No One Like You,&quot; by Jerry Goldsmith and David Zippell, to Scott Weber and others of CPCEV board. Flautist Lynette Johnson, part of the Trail Ridge Trio,
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Space Classics - Weekly Times Messenger
Google News - over 5 years
There will also be favourite classics such as Holst&#39;s The Planets as well as the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey, Strauss&#39; Blue Danube Waltz and Jerry Goldsmith&#39;s famous theme from Star Trek. One of Britain&#39;s most popular conductors,
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Google News article
Morning Call Sheet: My Advice On How to Increase DVD Sales, Netflix's Failures ... - Big Hollywood
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Jim Brown, Raquel Welch, Burt Reynolds, Fernando Lamas, Eric Braeden, Michael Forest, Jerry Goldsmith, Claire Huffaker. One of those underrated, late 60&#39;s, widescreen Westerns that must have been a blast to watch at the drive-in
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jerry Goldsmith
    THIRTIES
  • 2004
    Goldsmith's rejected score was later released on CD, 7 September 2004 through Varèse Sarabande, not long after his death in 2004.
    More Details Hide Details The album quickly became out of print and has since become a sought rarity among soundtrack collectors.
  • 2003
    His last work was with another long-time collaborator, Richard Donner (for whom Goldsmith had scored The Omen in 1976), on the 2003 science fiction film Timeline.
    More Details Hide Details However, due to a complicated post-production process, Goldsmith's score was rejected and replaced by a new score by composer Brian Tyler.
    Goldsmith's final cinematic score, composed during declining health, was the critically acclaimed music for the 2003 live action/animated film Looney Tunes: Back in Action, directed by long-time Goldsmith collaborator Joe Dante.
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  • 2001
    Goldsmith also composed an original score to the simulator attraction Soarin' Over California which debuted 8 February 2001 at the Disneyland Resort, and the same attraction Soarin which opened 5 May 2005 in Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort.
    More Details Hide Details It was later said that when Goldsmith first rode the ride, he left in tears and said, "I'd do anything to be part of this project. I'd even score the film for free."
  • 2000
    During the early 2000s, Goldsmith composed scores to the 2000 science fiction thriller Hollow Man, the 2001 mystery film Along Came a Spider, the 2001 drama The Last Castle, the 2002 action/political thriller The Sum of All Fears, and his last Star Trek film Star Trek: Nemesis (2002), which would also be the last film to feature the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation.
    More Details Hide Details Goldsmith had composed the scores to five of the first ten Star Trek movies up to that point.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1999
    In 1999, he also composed "Fanfare for Oscar" for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
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  • 1998
    Goldsmith concluded the decade with critically successful scores to such popular films as the 1998 action film Small Soldiers, his penultimate Star Trek film Star Trek: Insurrection (1998), the 1999 action adventure horror The Mummy, the 1999 horror film The Haunting, and the 1999 action adventure The 13th Warrior.
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    In 1998, he also composed a score of combined Eastern, orchestral, and synthetic elements for the Disney-animated film Mulan, which subsequently earned him his final Academy Award and Golden Globe Award nominations along with songwriter Matthew Wilder and lyricist David Zippel.
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  • 1997
    He also continued with scores for such films as the 1997 survival drama The Edge, his fourth Star Trek film installment in 1998, Star Trek: Insurrection, the 1998 science fiction horror Deep Rising, and the 1998 action thriller U.S. Marshals.
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    In 1997, he composed a new theme for the Universal Studios opening logo, first heard in The Lost World: Jurassic Park.
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    In 1997, Goldsmith also composed a percussive, jazzy score for the critically acclaimed crime drama L.A. Confidential.
    More Details Hide Details His score garnered him Academy Award and Golden Globe Award nominations, and was also one of the AFI's 250 nominees for the top twenty-five American film scores.
    In 1997, he was hired to replace a score by Randy Newman for Air Force One.
    More Details Hide Details Goldsmith, with the assistance of composer Joel McNeely, completed the brassy, heroic score in only twelve days.
  • 1996
    In 1996, Goldsmith composed the critically successful score to the horror action film The Ghost and the Darkness which featured a traditional Irish folk melody interwoven with African rhythms.
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  • 1995
    In 1995, Goldsmith also composed the theme for the UPN series Star Trek: Voyager for which he won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Main Title Theme Music.
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  • 1994
    Goldsmith composed acclaimed scores for such films as the 1994 superhero adaptation The Shadow, the 1994 thriller The River Wild, the 1994 romantic comedy I.Q., the 1995 action film Congo, the 1995 fantasy adventure First Knight, the 1995 science fiction drama Powder, the 1996 action film Executive Decision, and his third Star Trek film installment Star Trek: First Contact (1996) which he composed with his son Joel Goldsmith.
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  • 1993
    In 1993, Goldsmith also wrote an acclaimed score for the classic sports film Rudy, which has since been used in the trailers for numerous films including Angels in the Outfield (1994), Good Will Hunting (1997), Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (2002), and Seabiscuit (2003).
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  • 1992
    In 1992, Goldsmith composed and conducted a score to the erotic thriller Basic Instinct.
    More Details Hide Details The soundtrack, an unsettling hybrid of orchestral and electronic elements, garnered him another Academy Award nomination as well as a Golden Globe Award nomination and was later regarded by the composer as one of his most challenging works.
    In 1992, Goldsmith also composed a critically acclaimed score for the medical drama Medicine Man.
    More Details Hide Details In concert, Goldsmith would later recount a story of how actor Sean Connery copied Goldsmith's signature ponytail hairstyle for his character Robert Campbell in the film. In the film's closing credits, Goldsmith is listed as "hair designer".
  • 1991
    Other noteworthy scores of the era include Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) (in which Goldsmith also made a brief cameo appearance), the 1991 psychological thriller Sleeping with the Enemy, the 1991 family comedy Mom and Dad Save the World, the 1992 fantasy romance Forever Young, the 1993 thriller The Vanishing, and the 1993 family comedy Dennis the Menace.
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  • 1990
    He also composed critically acclaimed music for the 1990 science fiction action film Total Recall, which Goldsmith later regarded as one of his best scores.
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    In 1990, Jerry Goldsmith received critical acclaim for his score to the romantic drama The Russia House, which featured a unique mixture of Russian music and jazz to complement the nationalities and characteristics of the two main characters.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1987
    Goldsmith finished out the decade with noteworthy scores to such films as the 1987 medieval adventure Lionheart, the 1987 science fiction comedy Innerspace, the 1988 action film Rambo III, the 1989 science fiction horror Leviathan, and Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), his second Star Trek film score.
    More Details Hide Details Goldsmith's score to Leviathan (1989) incorporated the use of recorded whale sounds during the main titles. His critically acclaimed comedy score to The 'Burbs (1989) is also noteworthy for the use of pipe organ, recorded dog barking sound effects, and for parodying the trumpet "call to war" triplets on an echoplex from his previous score to Patton (1970).
  • 1984
    In an interview with Keyboard Magazine in 1984, Goldsmith said that in order to simulate the ambiance of a real orchestra, several speakers were set up in an actual orchestra hall similar to how they would be arranged if they were live players.
    More Details Hide Details The playback was re-recorded to capture the feel of the hall.
  • 1983
    Throughout the decade, many of his compositions became increasingly laced with synthetic elements such as his scores for the 1983 horror sequel Psycho II, the 1984 comedy horror film Gremlins (for which he won a Saturn Award for Best Music), the 1984 fantasy superhero adaptation Supergirl, Ridley Scott fantasy Legend (initially heard only in European prints and then years later in a 2002 director's cut), 1985 action sequel Rambo: First Blood Part II, 1985 family fantasy Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend, and 1986 horror movie Poltergeist II.
    More Details Hide Details He garnered another Academy Award nomination for his innovative, critically acclaimed score to 1986 sports drama Hoosiers, though he lost to Herbie Hancock for Round Midnight. The score incorporates synthesizers, orchestra, and the recorded sounds of basketball hits on a gymnasium floor. During the 80's, Goldsmith scored the Michael Crichton film, Runaway, the composer's first all-electronic score.
  • 1981
    He did, however, still manage to compose for such non-fantasy productions as the 1981 period television miniseries Masada (for which he won an Emmy Award), the controversial 1982 war film Inchon, the 1982 action classic First Blood, and his Academy Award and Golden Globe Award nominated score to 1983 political drama Under Fire in which he used the ethnic sounds of a South American pan flute, synthetic elements, and the prominently featured solo work of jazz guitarist Pat Metheny.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1977
    Throughout the 1980s, Goldsmith found himself increasingly scoring science fiction and fantasy films in the ongoing wake of the successful 1977 film Star Wars, composing for such films as the The Omen sequels Damien: Omen II (1978) and Omen III: The Final Conflict (1981), 1981 space western Outland, 1982 animated fantasy The Secret of NIMH, and the movie version of Twilight Zone: The Movie, which he composed in four different styles to accompany the film's four stories.
    More Details Hide Details In 1982, Goldsmith was hired to compose the music to the classic Tobe Hooper-directed, Steven Spielberg-produced horror film Poltergeist. He wrote several themes for the film including a gentle lullaby for the protagonist Carol Anne and her family's suburban life, a semi-religious theme for scenes concerning the souls trapped between the two worlds, and bombastic atonal bursts during scenes of horror. The film's score garnered him an Academy Award nomination, though he lost again to fellow composer John Williams for Spielberg's E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Goldsmith later returned in 1986 to compose the more synthetic score to Poltergeist II, the first of two sequels.
  • 1976
    Despite this, Goldsmith won only one Oscar, for his score to the 1976 film The Omen.
    More Details Hide Details This makes Goldsmith the most nominated composer to have won an Oscar only on one occasion. The American Film Institute respectively ranked Goldsmith's scores for Chinatown (1974) and Planet of the Apes (1968) 9 and 18 on their list of the 25 greatest film scores. He is one of only five composers to have more than one score featured in the list, including Elmer Bernstein, Bernard Herrmann, Max Steiner, and John Williams. His scores for the following films were also nominated for inclusion:
    He continued to have critical success with scores to such films as the 1976 dystopian science fiction Logan's Run, the 1977 period drama Islands in the Stream (which remained one of his personal favorites), the 1978 science fiction suspense Coma, the 1978 science fiction thriller Capricorn One, the 1978 disaster film The Swarm, the 1979 period comedy The Great Train Robbery, and his Academy Award-nominated score to the 1978 science fiction thriller The Boys from Brazil, in which he utilized lively waltzes to juxtapose the film's horrific concept, cloning Adolf Hitler.
    More Details Hide Details In 1979, Goldsmith composed a score to the landmark science fiction film Alien. His score featured an orchestra augmented by a shofar, didgeridoo, steel drum, and serpent (a 16th-century instrument), while creating further "alien" sounds by filtering string pizzicati through an echoplex. Many of the instruments were used in such atypical ways they were virtually unidentifiable. His score was, however, heavily edited during post-production and Goldsmith was required to rewrite music for several scenes. The final score resulted in several pieces being moved, replaced, or cut entirely. Director Ridley Scott and editor Terry Rawlings also, without Goldsmith's consent, purchased the rights to the "Main Title" from Freud (1962) which they used during the acid blood sequence. Despite the heavy edits and rewrites, Goldsmith's score for the film earned him a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Original Score and was one of the AFI's 250 nominees for the top twenty-five American film scores.
    In 1976, Goldsmith composed a dark choral score to the horror film The Omen, which was the first film score to feature the use of a choir in an Avant-garde style.
    More Details Hide Details The score was successful among critics and garnered Goldsmith his first (and ultimately only) Academy Award for Best Original Score and a nomination for Best Original Song for "Ave Satani". It was also one of the AFI's 250 nominees for the top twenty-five American film scores. His wife, Carol Heather Goldsmith, also wrote lyrics and performed a vocal track titled "The Piper Dreams" released solely on the soundtrack album. Goldsmith would go on to compose for two more entries in the franchise; Damien: Omen II (1978) and Omen III: The Final Conflict (1981).
  • 1975
    Goldsmith earned more critical praise with his score to the 1975 epic period adventure film The Wind and the Lion, which, true to the style of such Golden Age scores as Maurice Jarre's Lawrence of Arabia, relied upon a diverse ensemble including many Moroccan instruments and a large percussion section.
    More Details Hide Details The score garnered Goldsmith an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score, though he lost to fellow composer John Williams for his score to Jaws. The Wind and the Lion was also one of the AFI's 250 nominees for the top twenty-five American film scores.
  • 1974
    In 1974, Goldsmith was faced with the daunting task of replacing a score by composer Phillip Lambro to the neo-film noir Chinatown.
    More Details Hide Details With only ten days to compose and record an entirely new score, Goldsmith quickly produced a score that mixed an Eastern music sound with elements of jazz in an ensemble that only featured a trumpet, four pianos, four harps, two percussionists, and a string section. Goldsmith received an Academy Award nomination for his efforts though he lost to Nino Rota and Carmine Coppola for The Godfather Part II. The score to Chinatown is often regarded as one of the greatest scores of all time and ranks 9 on the AFI's list of top 25 American film scores. It was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score.
  • 1973
    In 1973, Goldsmith also wrote the theme for the TV series Barnaby Jones.
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    Goldsmith's critical success continued with his emotional score to the 1973 prison escape film Papillon, which also earned him an Academy Award nomination and a nomination as one of the AFI's top twenty-five American film scores.
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  • 1972
    He married Carol Heather in 1972, and the couple remained together until his death in 2004.
    More Details Hide Details His oldest son Joel Goldsmith (1957–2012) was also a composer and collaborated with his father on the score for Star Trek: First Contact, composing approximately twenty-two minutes of the score. Jerry Goldsmith also conducted Joel's theme for The Untouchables and composed the theme for the pilot Hollister, scored by Joel. Goldsmith's daughter, Carrie Goldsmith, went to high school with famed Titanic composer James Horner, who also composed music for Star Treks second and third films: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. Carrie Goldsmith was working on a biography of her father, though the book has been suspended indefinitely for unspecified reasons.
  • 1970
    Goldsmith received more critical praise with his daring music to the 1970 World War II biopic Patton.
    More Details Hide Details Throughout the score, Goldsmith used an echoplex to loop recorded sounds of "call to war" triplets played on the trumpet that musically represented General George S. Patton's belief in reincarnation. The main theme also consisted of a symphonic march accompanied by a pipe organ to represent the protagonist's militaristic yet deeply religious nature. The film's music subsequently earned Goldsmith an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score and was one of the American Film Institute's 250 nominees for the top twenty-five American film scores.
  • 1969
    In 1969, he also composed the theme to the comedy-drama television series Room 222.
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  • OTHER
  • 1968
    Goldsmith concluded the decade with scores to such films as the 1968 western Bandolero!, the 1969 spy thriller The Chairman, the 1969 science fiction film The Illustrated Man, and the 1969 western 100 Rifles.
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    In 1968, Goldsmith caught massive critical attention with his landmark, controversial soundtrack to the post-apocalyptic science fiction epic Planet of the Apes, which was one of the first film scores to be written entirely in an Avant garde style.
    More Details Hide Details When scoring Planet of the Apes, Goldsmith used such innovative techniques as looping drums into an echoplex, using the orchestra to imitate the grunting sounds of apes, having horns blown without mouthpieces, and instructing the woodwind players to finger their keys without using any air. He also used steel mixing bowls, among other objects, to create unique percussive sounds. The score went on to garner Goldsmith another Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score and now ranks in 18 on the American Film Institute's top twenty-five American film scores. Though he did not return to compose for its 1970 sequel Beneath the Planet of the Apes, Goldsmith scored the third installment in the Planet of the Apes franchise, 1971's Escape from the Planet of the Apes.
  • 1965
    His scores for Seven Days in May and The Sand Pebbles also garnered Goldsmith his first two respective Golden Globe Award nominations for Best Original Score in 1965 and 1967.
    More Details Hide Details During this time, he also composed for many lighter, comedic films such as the family comedy The Trouble with Angels (1966), the James Bond parodies Our Man Flint (1966) and its sequel In Like Flint (1967), and the comedy The Flim-Flam Man (1967).
  • 1964
    Following his success with Lonely Are the Brave and Freud, Goldsmith went on to achieve even more critical recognition with the theme music to The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964), and scores to such films as the 1964 western Rio Conchos, the 1964 political thriller Seven Days in May, the 1965 romantic drama A Patch of Blue, the 1965 epic war film In Harm's Way (in which Goldsmith also made a brief cameo appearance), the 1966 World War I air combat film The Blue Max, the 1966 period naval war epic The Sand Pebbles, the 1967 thriller Warning Shot, the 1967 western Hour of the Gun, and the 1968 controversial mystery The Detective.
    More Details Hide Details His score for The Blue Max is regarded by many Goldsmith aficionados as one of the very best scores he wrote during his long and distinguished career. Interestingly, he almost didn't accept the assignment when he watched the final cut with the producers who had temp-tracked it with Richard Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra. He said, "I admit it worked fairly well but my first reaction was to get up and walk away from the job, but I couldn't. Once you've heard music like that with the picture, it makes your own scoring more difficult to arrive at, it clouds your thinking." Nonetheless, what resulted was breathtaking and the main theme captures the fear and joy of flight many times throughout the film. It is curious that films with significant sequences that involve flight inspired Goldsmith to write some of his most exhilarating music, such as in Supergirl, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, A Gathering of Eagles, Night Crossing, Air Force One and Tora! Tora! Tora! Goldsmith's scores to A Patch of Blue and The Sand Pebbles garnered him his second and third Academy Award nominations, respectively, and were both one of the 250 nominees for the American Film Institute's top twenty-five American film scores.
  • 1963
    In 1963, Goldsmith composed a score to The Stripper, his first collaboration with director Franklin J. Schaffner for whom Goldsmith would later score the films Planet of the Apes (1968), Patton (1970), Papillon (1973), and The Boys from Brazil (1978).
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  • 1962
    That same year, Goldsmith composed the mostly atonal and dissonant score to the 1962 pseudo-biopic Freud that focused on a five-year period of the life of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.
    More Details Hide Details Goldsmith's score went on to garner him his first Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score, though he lost to fellow first-time nominee Maurice Jarre for his music to Lawrence of Arabia (1962).
    However, he only began receiving widespread name recognition after his intimate score to the 1962 classic western Lonely Are the Brave.
    More Details Hide Details His involvement in the picture was the result of a recommendation by veteran composer Alfred Newman who had been impressed with Goldsmith's score on the television show Thriller and took it upon himself to recommend Goldsmith to the head of Universal Pictures’ music department, despite having never met him.
  • 1960
    Jerry Goldsmith began the decade composing for such television shows as Dr. Kildare and Thriller as well as the 1960 drama film The Spiral Road.
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  • 1957
    He continued with scores to such films as the 1957 western Face of a Fugitive and the 1959 science fiction film City of Fear.
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    His feature film debut occurred when he composed the music to the 1957 western Black Patch.
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  • 1950
    Goldsmith was married twice. He was first married to Sharon Hennagin in 1950; they divorced in 1970.
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    In an interview with Andy Velez from BarnesandNoble.com, Goldsmith stated, "It was about 1950.
    More Details Hide Details CBS had a workshop, and once a week the employees, whatever their talents, whether they were ushers or typists, would produce a radio show. But you had to be an employee. They needed someone to do music, and I knew someone there who said I'd be great for this. I'd just gotten married and needed a job, so they faked a typing test for me. Then I could do these shows. About six months later, the music department heard what I did, liked it, and gave me a job." He later progressed into scoring such live CBS television shows as Climax! and Playhouse 90. He also scored multiple episodes of the television series The Twilight Zone. He remained at CBS until 1960, after which he moved on to Revue Studios and then to MGM Studios for producer Norman Felton, whom he had worked for during live television and would later compose music for such television shows as Dr. Kildare and The Man from U.N.C.L.E..
    In 1950, Goldsmith found work at CBS as a clerk typist in the network's music department under director Lud Gluskin.
    More Details Hide Details There he began writing scores for such radio shows as CBS Radio Workshop, Frontier Gentleman, and Romance.
  • 1945
    At age sixteen, Goldsmith saw the 1945 film Spellbound in theaters and was inspired by veteran composer Miklós Rózsa's soundtrack to pursue a career in music.
    More Details Hide Details Goldsmith later enrolled and attended the University of Southern California where he was able to attend courses by Rózsa, but dropped out in favor of a more "practical music program" at the Los Angeles City College. There he was able to coach singers, work as an assistant choral director, play piano accompaniment, and work as an assistant conductor.
  • 1929
    Goldsmith, was born 10 February 1929 in Los Angeles, California.
    More Details Hide Details His parents were Tessa (née Rappaport), a school teacher, and Morris Goldsmith, a structural engineer. He started playing piano at age six, but only "got serious" by the time he was eleven. At age thirteen, he studied piano privately with legendary concert pianist and educator Jakob Gimpel (whom Goldsmith would later employ to perform piano solos in his score to The Mephisto Waltz) and by the age of sixteen he was studying both theory and counterpoint under Italian composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, who also tutored such noteworthy composers and musicians as Henry Mancini, Nelson Riddle, Herman Stein, André Previn, Marty Paich, and John Williams.
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