Jerry Stiller
American comedian
Jerry Stiller
Gerald Isaac "Jerry" Stiller is an American comedian and actor. He spent many years in the comedy team Stiller and Meara with his wife Anne Meara. Stiller and Meara are the parents of actor Ben Stiller and actress Amy Stiller. Jerry is best known for his recurring role as Frank Costanza on the television series Seinfeld and his supporting role as Arthur Spooner on the television series The King of Queens.
Biography
Jerry Stiller's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Jerry Stiller from around the web
Time to kill? Here are 130 riveting movies you can watch on Netflix right now
Yahoo News - about 1 year
This list is updated monthly to reflect recent availability and to showcase films currently streaming on Netflix, whether talking classics or modern gems. Netflix offers roughly a gazillion different movies available through its streaming platform — well, approximately a gazillion. However, while the landmark service might become surprisingly accurate with its suggestions once you’ve been using it for a while, it’s still often tough to find something worth watching amid the trove of terrible choices.That being the case, we’ve taken the time to wade through the ridiculous amount of content in order to bring you a list of some of the best films currently available on Netflix Instant. Planning your weekend has never been easier. Related: Here’s what’s new on Netflix in December, and what’s going away Choose a genre: Recent Additions Documentaries Comedies Dramas Thrillers & Action Adventure Foreign Sci-Fi & Fantasy Kids Horror Romance New for December 2015 A League of Their Own Pl ...
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Yahoo News article
A Shark of Another Color
Huffington Post - over 1 year
On August 31, 1928, when The Threepenny Opera had its world premiere at the Theater am Schiffbauerdamm, Kurt Weill's music scored strongly with audiences in Berlin. Inspired by John Gay's 1728 ballad opera (The Beggar's Opera), Bertolt Brecht's biting lyrics depicted the shockingly amoral behavior of the lower classes in Victorian England. One song in particular ("The Ballad of Mack The Knife") became an international standard after being translated into English by Marc Blitzstein for the show's 1956 long-running off-Broadway production at the Theater De Lys (whose cast included Lotte Lenya, Jerry Orbach, Bea Arthur, Ed Asner, Charlotte Rae, and Jerry Stiller). The first two lines of Blitzstein's translation for Mack The Knife (which has been recorded by numerous artists such as Bobby Darin, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, and Ella Fitzgerald) read: Oh, the shark has pretty teeth, dear. And he shows them, pearly white. Brecht was alluding to Mack's jackknife rather than one ...
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Huffington Post article
So You Want to Be a Famous Self-Published Author?
Huffington Post - about 2 years
"It's so easy to become an author of novels. Others have done it, why not me?" Authordom In writing a novel, all you have to do is follow the formula. Classes abound that teach the formulas. Hell, you probably believe you can imagine and create stories as good as any of them. You have things to say, stories to tell, fantastic ideas floating around in your imagination that deserve to be communicated to a vast army of readers. You've been validated by your teachers and peers. Maybe a publisher took a chance on your first novel. Okay you didn't sell that much but the publisher didn't promote it and you know in your gut it is a great piece of work. It is a prize worth pursuing. You burn to write stories and novels. It is in your genes. You thirst to see your work converted to the big or little screen. And the money? Lots of money rolling in. You'd be lionized at book parties. People would line up for your autograph. You know in your heart you can be the next Hemingway, the next Fa ...
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Huffington Post article
Philip Seymour Hoffman's Funeral Held In NYC, Celebrity Friends Mourn Alongside His Family
Huffington Post - about 3 years
NEW YORK (AP) — The private funeral for Philip Seymour Hoffman in Manhattan on Friday is underway with a somber, star-studded audience in attendance that includes Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, Ethan Hawke, Amy Adams, Ellen Burstyn and Spike Lee. The list of mourners also included Michelle Williams, Julianne Moore, Joaquin Phoenix, Louis C.K., Mary Louise Parker, John Slattery, Jerry Stiller, Marisa Tomei, Diane Sawyer and her director husband, Mike Nichols. Hoffman, 46, was found dead Sunday of an apparent heroin overdose in his apartment. He leaves behind his partner of 15 years, Mimi O'Donnell, and their three children. The actor's body was carried into the church by pallbearers and O'Donnell — holding their youngest child — followed. Playwright David Bar Katz, who found Hoffman's body, looked visibly upset as he arrived. The ceremony was being held at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, the same limestone church that hosted the funerals of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Lena Horne ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: Why We Fought the Civil War: Reading Thomas Fleming's A Disease of the Public Mind
Huffington Post - over 3 years
While reading Thomas Fleming's new book, A Disease of the Public Mind: A New Understanding of Why We Fought the Civil War, about how America blundered through the worst slaughter in the history of our country, I was reminded of that oft quoted phrase, "those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." With myth destroying zeal and careful research Fleming contends that a fanatical sense of moral superiority on the part of the abolitionists, an irrational fear of a race war by Southerners abetted by sinister political posturing, and a deeply biased media were the prime motivating factors in a war that by far surpassed the casualties of all wars combined since America was founded. Fleming clearly reiterates the point that from our beginnings as a nation we have been plagued by the moral dilemma posed by the entrenched and repugnant institution of slavery. Indeed, a number of signers of the Declaration of Independence, and our most revered forefathers, incl ...
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Huffington Post article
Jonathan Kim: ReThink Review: When Comedy Went to School - Comedy History in the Catskills
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I've been a stand up comedy hobbyist and enthusiast for several years now, though I'll admit that I'm not terribly versed on comedy history, which for me started with listening to a cassette of Eddie Murphy's Delirious on the ride home from a Boy Scout campout. The clunkily-named documentary When Comedy Went to School traces the roots of modern stand up to a rather unlikely place -- the resorts of New York state's Catskill mountains (like the one famously portrayed in the movie Dirty Dancing) where Jewish families in the 1930s through the 1960s would flee New York City's heat and humidity during the summertime for the Catskills, which was America's biggest resort area at the time. It was there that comedy icons like Jerry Lewis, Jackie Mason, Rodney Dangerfield, Joan Rivers, and even Woody Allen were able to work and hone material during weeklong stands in front of packed, tough crowds, creating the style and rhythm of what we now consider modern stand up comedy. Watch the tra ...
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Huffington Post article
Dr. Cheryl Pappas: When Comedy Went to School: The Movie That Celebrates Jewish Humor
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Before there was Prozac, there was Jewish comedy. There is only one fail-proof cure that I know of for enduring the trials of our times, and that is laughter. I know that people are not always in the mood to laugh, due to depression, the state of the world, and our own personal challenges. If only we could stay open to what is funny. The pharmaceutical business would have fierce competition from a substance that is free: laughter. Scientists say that laughing changes the biochemistry of the brain, at least temporarily. I'm not saying that trauma or long-standing biochemical depression can be simply treated or transcended. I am also not proposing that the grimmer realities of life be dismissed or denied. But I am wondering: is it possible to create a movement where laughter is used as a cure and sought as a true healing? When Comedy Went to School is a terrific movie to kick-start this endeavor. This brilliant new film showcases the roots of Jewish hu ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: Maybe We Want a Sexy Prexy
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Anthony Weiner must be channeling Jesus as he plows ahead with running for Mayor of New York City. After all, Jesus had it right, "Let He Who is Without Sin Cast the First Stone." What Weiner intuits is that most of us generate sexual fantasies that may seem weird and far out to some, while perfectly normal to others. Indeed, many people are comfortable acting out these fantasies with consenting partners. Society has tried to regulate these urges by selectively outlawing some practices as dangerous or illegal in civilized society. Most of us are brought up within the constraints of these laws, the objective being to protect us from predators or those who are too innocent or powerless to protest. Moral and legal issues aside, we are now living in a world that allows us to view a smorgasbord of sexual fantasies and practices in living color. Most of this fare offers images of sexual gymnastics and bizarre penetrations, and the catalog of such practices seems infinite. Th ...
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Huffington Post article
1990 Things From The 90s (Seriously)
Huffington Post - over 3 years
It's been more than a decade since the 1990s ended, yet the Internet can't seem to go a day without a reminder of the neon slap bracelets that may have been banned from your school. Yes, we get it. Times are tough and there's comfort in reflection, but enough is enough. Below, a final goodbye to the 90s to end the nostalgia once and for all. (We're not kidding. There are 1990 items below.) 1. Scrunchies 2. "The Wild Thornberries" 3. Dawson and Joey 4. "Hercules: The Legendary Journeys" 5. Mr. Feeny 7. MTV playing music videos 8. Snick 9. The premiere of "Freaks and Geeks" 10. Levar Burton 11. "Daria" 12. "Arthur" 13. "The Powerpuff Girls" 14. "Smart Guy" 15. Comedy Central globe logo with buildings 16. "The X-Files" 17. Rosie O'Donnell 18. Bill Nye 19. "Dawson's Creek" 20. The Mighty Ducks" 21. "Are You Afraid of the Dark" 22. Cornholio 23. Rachel Green 24. Tim Allen 25. "All That" 26. "Beverl ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: Sex and the Novelist
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When I first began writing novels, I used to think a lot about sex. It was, of course, before everything changed. Before the sexual revolution, before Internet pornography, before the "F" word became the mode of common discourse, before every form of sexual activity started to be portrayed as commonplace as traffic lights. The excitement of uncovering sex in literature is no longer relevant in today's ubiquitous sexualized culture. I was always bold in portraying my characters in the various modes and gradations of sexual activity, but only if it was in the context of their true motivations and not some cheap add-on to deliberately induce erotic arousal. One of the dominant themes in my novels has always been the nature of love and the mystery of sexual attraction. In these explorations, sex is always in the wings, waiting to manifest itself and reveal my characters' inner drives and motivations. The issue for me in those early days was about language, the limits of de ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: The Aspiring Writer
Huffington Post - over 3 years
For the aspiring writer in the middle to late 20th century the goal, however mythical and fantastical, was to write The Great American Novel. What this meant was that we passionately burned to be recognized as a kind of literary phenomenon, an "artist writer" who had created a novel out of his or her imagination so compelling, so blazing with truth, impact and insight, and fashioned into a story with characters so memorable and important that it encapsulated the sweep and meaning of the universal human condition. It was a mission, a dedicated and inspired artistic endeavor with the goal of attracting vast numbers of intelligent readers. The traditional image of the writer in the garret, lost in the vapors of his imagination, fashioning his parallel world for the benefit of all mankind, was as accurate a description as one could devise of the dedicated writer's toil and sacrifice in the service of literature. We had our literary Gods to emulate, our role models, livin ...
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Huffington Post article
'The Good Wife' Books 'Arrested Development' Star
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Jeffrey Tambor will make an appearance on "The Good Wife." In the Season 5 premiere (Sunday, Sept. 29) of the CBS series, the "Arrested Development" star will play a judge who's in a race against the clock for a case involving the death penalty. Other guest stars who have played judges on "The Good Wife" include Denis O'Hare, Ana Gasteyer, David Fonteno and Jerry Stiller. Tambor's not the only new face popping up on "The Good Wife's" fifth season: Melissa George will play Peter Florrick's (Chris Noth) new in-house ethics counsel, Juliet Rylance has signed on as a potential new love interest for Kalinda (Archie Panjabi), and Ben Rappaport will appear as a fourth year from Lockhart/Gardner joining Alicia (Julianna Margulies) and Cary's (Matt Czuchry) new firm. "The Good Wife" Season 5 premieres Sunday, Sept. 29 at 9 p.m. ET on CBS.
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Huffington Post article
Kristin McCracken: When Comedy Went to School: The Catskills Were a Boot Camp for the Greatest Generation of Comedians
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Jerry Lewis / Credit: International Film Circuit The Borscht Belt, the Jewish Alps, the Sour Cream Sierras... From the 1940s to the 1960s, the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York (primarily Sullivan and Ulster Counties) were the place to be for the growing Jewish community in the Northeast. Each summer, families would visit one of the 900+ hotels in the region for relaxation, cultural camaraderie, food (endless amounts of food!), and entertainment. Out of this unique subculture grew what we now know as standup comedy. As audiences grew tired of vaudeville, and their tastes became more sophisticated, comedy had to adapt, and adapt it did. Aspiring comics honed their trade in the Catskills, which soon became a laboratory for modern comedy. Icons such as Jerry Lewis, Mel Brooks, Buddy Hackett, Carl Reiner, Jerry Stiller, Danny Kaye, Lenny Bruce, Sid Caesar all got their start at these legendary resorts, learning from their predecessors what worked -- and what didn't -- ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: The Future of English Literature and Humanities
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I am a proud, grateful and militant holder of a degree in English literature. It has enhanced and enriched my life in ways that have given me insight into the human condition. It has introduced me to the great communicators and storytellers of ages past, offering wisdom, knowledge, joy, insight, clarity, and the essential power and civilizing influence of words. I have spent a long and fruitful life surrounded by some of the great minds and amazing imaginations ever recorded and continue to populate my content bank with many more. I cannot conceive of a life without the close friendship of great storytellers like Dickens, Trollope, Austin, Hardy, the Brontes, Thackeray, Balzac, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Twain, Harte, and the literary Gods of our own American culture like Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Roth, and hundreds of others of equal worth. Indeed without the tutelage and wonder of Shakespeare what would we know about the truth of human behavior? ...
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Huffington Post article
HAPPY FATHER'S DAY: Here Are 15 Real Life Father And Son Appearances On Screen
Business Insider - over 3 years
The sci-fi thriller, "After Earth," starring father and son duo Will and Jaden Smith, may not have been the pair's finest box office moment. But we can't imagine that the Fresh Prince is disappointed in his little prince.  The Smiths have appeared on screen together numerous times. Jaden acted alongside his famous dad in the "Men in Black" series and played his son in "The Pursuit of Happyness." The Smiths aren't the first father and son couple to act on screen and they certainly won't be the last. In celebration of Father's Day weekend, let's take a look at 15 more fathers who took their sons to the set. And to all fathers out there, Happy Father's Day! Check out the father-son duos on screen > Comedic father-and-son duo, Ben and Jerry Stiller star in plenty of films together including "The Heartbreak Kid," "Zoolander," "Heavyweights" and "Hot Pursuit." Three generations of the Douglas clan—Kirk, Michael and Cameron—starred together in "It Runs in the Famil ...
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Business Insider article
Warren Adler: Coming of the Aged
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Recent movie releases such as The New and Exotic Marigold Hotel and Quartet seem to be a crack in the mantra of marketing pundits that the only worthy targets of mass media are teenagers and those who reach the ceiling age of forty-nine, not beyond. Marigold Hotel, already an astounding worldwide commercial success starring the brilliant Judi Dench and Maggie Smith along with Tom Wilkinson and Bill Nighy among others, deals with the hopes and dreams of still vital people of years who are determined to aspire, engage with life, seek love and joy, challenge fate, and to, as the British would say, carry on. Quartet, which marks the debut of Dustin Hoffman at age 75 as a director, is a story of opera singers in their 70's and 80's who live in a retirement home in England and engage with each other in an atmosphere where their lifelong relationship to music thrives and continues to energize them. In this movie as well, the life force of the home's residents is far from over ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: Misreading the Facts on E-Books
Huffington Post - about 4 years
The reported decline in e-reader sales is being misread as an indication that consumption of the e-book itself is in decline. This false conjecture has given authors and publishers hope that the printed book will return to the economic dominance it enjoyed before the technological innovation of the e-reader device. No way. The e-book revolution continues apace and the print book business will continue to decline, despite the optimistic media huckstering. Media pundits and professional trend forecasters often do not look beyond the obvious to validate their prognostications. They have pointed to the proliferation of tablets as cutting into the sale of dedicated e-readers, which is correct as far as it goes, but the fact is that the tablet is an all-purpose device in which book reading is a mere fraction of its uses. Distractions, for the serious book reader, in the form of countless apps, notifications, videos, email access, advertisements, etc. that come with tablets ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: What Classics Will Our Century Produce?
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Will 21st century authors of fiction produce any classics? Perhaps we must first consider how a classic becomes a classic. We apply numerous reasons for such a coronation citing artistic quality, universal relevancy, emotional integrity, critical acclaim by the author's contemporaries, literary influence, remarkable insight, imaginative style, effective use of language and a host of high praise that has been passed through time like a railroad car glides over a well-worn track pulled by the power of a locomotive. The potential for a classic starts out in the author's mind, and is then transposed into the published work. Readers read and react with awesome praise, critics review with ecstatic abandon, academics discover, recommend and insert the book into their curriculums and libraries, bookstores stock the book, and most who discover and study the work exult in its story and style. At times, this acclaim happens instantly, but often the discovery of a work emerges m ...
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Huffington Post article
Iconic Deli Closes After 75 Years
Huffington Post - about 4 years
The New York Times brings word that New York's famous Stage Deli closed at midnight on Thursday, November 29. The restaurant, which had been open since 1937, was known for its massive sandwiches and Jewish American deli fare. While one can argue that all restaurants close, and it's just part of the life and death cycle of restaurants, there's something especially poignant about this closing amongst those who follow deli history. In the 2009 book Save The Deli, author David Sax traces the history of the Jewish deli, and finds that a slew of establishments that once epitomized Jewish food are no longer in existence. With the Stage Deli's closure, we are getting a bit closer to losing a part of American Jewish heritage. There's no need to get too nostalgic or wax too poetic though -- let's remember that Stage Deli was also a huge tourist attraction with pretty exorbitant prices. And as we lose a bit of the old, there's a lot of interesting new Jewish food trends appearing ( ...
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Huffington Post article
Warren Adler: Stuck in the Middle
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Okay, I admit it. I'm in the middle. There are some things I detest in the Republican idea of how to run things and there are some things I can't stand in the way the Democrats run things. For example, as a poor boy born in Brooklyn as the big depression hit, I know the value of money. Debt scares me. It always has. I was there. I saw my mother cry for a week when she accidentally flushed a five-dollar bill down the toilet. My father never could find a permanent job. We were always being dispossessed and moving in with my grandparents who lived in a tiny three-bedroom house in Brooklyn, which my uncles chipped in to buy for their parents. Eleven people lived there with one bathroom. Food was cheap then, and we never went hungry. I got my working papers when I was fourteen and worked any kind of a job after school. I could give you a list, but it would run pages. Discrimination of any kind also scares me. Been there, done that. I'm Jewish and got a snootful as a ki ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jerry Stiller
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2012
    Age 84
    As of 2012, Stiller has been a spokesman for Xfinity.
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  • 2010
    Age 82
    Starting in October 2010, Stiller and Meara began starring in a Yahoo web series, Stiller & Meara from Red Hour Digital, in which they discussed current topics.
    More Details Hide Details Each episode was about two minutes long.
  • 2007
    Age 79
    On February 9, 2007, Stiller and Meara were honored with a joint star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
    More Details Hide Details On October 28, 2010, the couple appeared on an episode of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. Stiller voiced the announcer on the children's educational show Crashbox.
    Stiller later appeared in cameos in later in-concert films for the band's 2007-2008 Snakes & Arrows Tour.
    More Details Hide Details Stiller appeared on Dick Clark's $10,000 Pyramid show as himself in the 1970s, but actual footage of this appearance was later edited into an episode of The King of Queens to make it appear that his character was a contestant on the show, and he was bitter as he never received his parting gift, a lifetime supply of "Rice-A-Roni, the San Francisco Treat". He also appeared on the game show Tattletales with his wife Anne in the "Blue rooting section". (Reran Fox 2 Detroit, MI channel 2.3 on 6/2/15 7:00 AM) In the late 1990s, Stiller appeared in a series of Nike television commercials as the ghost of deceased Green Bay Packers head coach Vince Lombardi. Stiller has appeared in various motion pictures, most notably Zoolander (2001) and Secret of the Andes (1999).
  • 2004
    Age 76
    Stiller played himself in filmed skits, opening and closing Canadian rock band Rush's 30th Anniversary Tour concerts in 2004.
    More Details Hide Details These appearances are seen on the band's DVD R30: 30th Anniversary World Tour, released in 2005.
  • 2000
    Age 72
    Stiller's memoir, Married to Laughter: A Love Story Featuring Anne Meara, was published by Simon & Schuster © 2000; ISBN 0-684-86903-9.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1998
    Age 70
    Stiller obliged, and played the role of Arthur Spooner, the father of Carrie Heffernan, in the sitcom from 1998 until 2007.
    More Details Hide Details Stiller said this role tested his acting ability more than any others have and that, before being a part of King of Queens, he only saw himself as a "decent actor".
  • 1997
    Age 69
    He was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series in 1997, and won the American Comedy Award for Funniest Male Guest Appearance in a TV Series for his portrayal of Frank Costanza.
    More Details Hide Details After Seinfelds run ended, Stiller had planned on retiring, but Kevin James asked him to join the cast of The King of Queens. James, who played the leading role of Doug Heffernan, had told Stiller that he needed him in order to have a successful show.
  • 1993
    Age 65
    Stiller played the irascible Frank Costanza, the father of George Costanza in the sitcom Seinfeld from 1993 to 1998.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1986
    Age 58
    The duo's own 1986 TV sitcom, The Stiller and Meara Show, in which Stiller played the deputy mayor of New York City and Meara portrayed his wife, a TV commercial actress, was not successful
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  • 1979
    Age 51
    From 1979 to 1982, Stiller and Meara hosted HBO Sneak Previews, a half-hour show produced monthly on which they described the movies and programs to be featured in the coming month.
    More Details Hide Details They also did some comedy sketches between show discussions.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1954
    Age 26
    Stiller was married to Anne Meara from 1954 until her death on May 23, 2015.
    More Details Hide Details Their son is actor-comedian Ben Stiller (born 1965) and their daughter is actress Amy Stiller (born 1961). He is also a grandfather to two children.
  • 1953
    Age 25
    In the 1953 Phoenix Theater production of Coriolanus (produced by John Houseman), Stiller (along with Gene Saks and Jack Klugman) formed "the best trio of Shakespearian clowns that he had ever seen on any stage".
    More Details Hide Details The comedy team Stiller and Meara, composed of Stiller and wife, Anne Meara, was successful in the 1960s and 1970s, with numerous appearances on television variety programs, mainly on The Ed Sullivan Show. Their career declined as variety series gradually disappeared, but they subsequently forged a career in radio commercials, notably the campaign for Blue Nun wine. They starred in their own syndicated five-minute sketch comedy show, Take Five with Stiller and Meara (1977–1978).
  • 1950
    Age 22
    A drama major at Syracuse University, he earned a bachelor's degree in Speech and Drama in 1950.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1927
    Born
    Born on June 8, 1927.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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