Jessica Dubroff
American child pilot trainee
Jessica Dubroff
Jessica Whitney Dubroff was a seven-year-old pilot trainee who died attempting to become the youngest person to fly an airplane across the United States. Twenty-four hours into her quest, her Cessna 177B Cardinal single engine propeller aircraft, flown by her flight instructor, crashed after takeoff from Cheyenne Regional Airport in Cheyenne, Wyoming, killing all on board: Dubroff, her father, and her flight instructor.
Biography
Jessica Dubroff's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Jessica Dubroff from around the web
Fear factor - Chicago Tribune (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
What else but vestigial disbelief that airplanes do not drop from the sky of their own weight could have inspired broadcasters to take such note of Jessica Dubroff's effort? You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this
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Google News article
Fast Forward; Legal Eagles
NYTimes - over 19 years
Jessica dubroff died 17 months ago as a very young passenger in the left seat of a Cessna airplane. The pilot, in the right seat, took off in a driving rainstorm, in the thin air of an unfamiliar high-altitude airport, with the fuel-air mixture improperly set and the plane carrying almost a hundred pounds over its certified weight limit. Without
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NYTimes article
Instructor Error Cited in Crash Of Plane Flown by 7-Year-Old
NYTimes - almost 20 years
A 7-year-old girl's effort to become the youngest person to pilot a plane across the United States ended in a fatal crash last April because the flight instructor aboard tried too hard to keep an overly ambitious schedule driven by ''media commitments,'' the National Transportation Safety Board concluded today. The 52-year-old instructor, Joe Reid,
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NYTimes article
Clinton Signs a Wide-Ranging Measure on Airport Security
NYTimes - over 20 years
In a move to increase air safety after the crash of TWA Flight 800, President Clinton today signed an aviation bill that includes a range of new baggage-scanning, passenger-screening and counter-terrorism measures as part of a program of stepped-up surveillance at airports. ''It will improve the security of air travel,'' Mr. Clinton said at a White
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NYTimes article
Departing F.A.A. Man: Expert Lacking Finesse
NYTimes - over 20 years
Soon after the crash of the single-engine plane that killed 7-year-old Jessica Dubroff on April 11, the calls poured into the Federal Aviation Administration. How could the agency let a child fly a plane? Agency officials turned to the same person they had relied on for years for quick answers to tough questions: Anthony J. Broderick, who has been
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NYTimes article
The Nation;Lessons of Flying in a Free Market
NYTimes - almost 21 years
HOURS after the Valujet crash last weekend, the airline's president and the Transportation Secretary closed ranks, guarding each other's backs from an onslaught of questions about the safety of Valujet and other airlines overseen by the Federal Aviation Administration. "The F.A.A. has been highly complimentary of the steps that we have taken," said
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NYTimes article
From an Airliner's Black Box, Next-to-Last Words
NYTimes - almost 21 years
FEW offices have as little privacy as an airliner cockpit, where a microphone picks up a pilot's every word, chuckle and yawn. A recorder, housed in a so-called black box, continually erases all but the last 30 minutes of conversation. It stops when the plane's power is off and, on much rarer occasions, in a crash. If the recorder is recovered, the
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NYTimes article
Observer;The Demon Success
NYTimes - almost 21 years
The death last week of Jessica Dubroff, the 7-year-old flier, produced a spate of un-American criticism of parents who push their children too hard too soon. This outburst resulted not from a sudden public onset of good sense, but only because of the melodramatic way Jessica died. After the fatal crash it suddenly became obvious, even to parents
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NYTimes article
Answer to Dubroff Tragedy Is Common Sense
NYTimes - almost 21 years
To the Editor: Everyone who has jumped on the bandwagon to criticize the "exploitation" of 7-year-old Jessica Dubroff should think about what they might have said had she been successful. ERIKA CRAVINHO Middletown, Conn., April 12, 1996
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NYTimes article
INSIDE
NYTimes - almost 21 years
End to Immigrant Dreams Yakov and Rita Gluzman, Russian immigrants, found wealth along with marital discord after moving to New Jersey. Now she is being questioned in his killing. Page B1. Making Clear Who's Boss At the swearing-in of Police Commissioner Bratton's replacement, the spotlight this time was as much on Mayor Giuliani. Page B1. New
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NYTimes article
April 7-13;A Small Pilot Dies
NYTimes - almost 21 years
The girl was 7 years old, she just loved to pilot airplanes from atop her red booster seat, and she pulled at the nation's heart when she died Thursday in a Wyoming plane crash while she attempted to set a record as the youngest person to fly an airplane across the United States. Jessica Dubroff had successfully piloted the single-engine Cessna
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NYTimes article
Safety Mistake Cited in Crash Of Girl's Plane
NYTimes - almost 21 years
An investigator from the National Transportation Safety Board said this evening that the single-engine plane that crashed on Thursday, killing 7-year-old Jessica Dubroff, her father, Lloyd, and her flight instructor, was overweight when it left the airport at Cheyenne, Wyo., in a thunderstorm. And the pattern of injuries to the hands and wrists of
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jessica Dubroff
    CHILDHOOD
  • 1996
    Age 7
    In December 1996, Lisa Hathaway filed a counter-suit against Melinda Dubroff and Lloyd Dubroff's estate for $1.5 million, the exact amount of money Lloyd Dubroff intended, saying Lloyd Dubroff "gave his word he would care for and support her for the rest and remainder of her natural life."
    More Details Hide Details On December 18, 1997, San Mateo County Superior Court Judge Judith Kozloski ruled that the insurance benefits should be split equally between the two women, $1.5 million each, and dismissed the other claims. Dubroff was buried at Mount Hope Cemetery in Pescadero, California.
    On October 9, 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act of 1996, including the Child Pilot Safety Act, into law.
    More Details Hide Details The statute prohibits anyone who does not hold at least a private pilot certificate and a current medical certificate from manipulating the controls of an aircraft, if that individual "is attempting to set a record or engage in an aeronautical competition or aeronautical feat." Since a medical certificate and a private pilot's license have a minimum age requirement of 16 and 17 respectively, the new rule prohibits "child pilots" such as Jessica Dubroff and Vicki Van Meter from manipulating the flight controls if they are pursuing a record, and the pilot in command's pilot certificate may be revoked for allowing such activity. After the crash, there were claims that the media frenzy around the "bogus" record attempt contributed to the accident by helping promote the flight and pressuring its schedule. This was supported by the NTSB, which determined that the pressure induced by the intense media attention was a "contributing factor" in the accident. ABC's Ted Koppel reflected on the media's role in the tragedy on Nightline: "We need to begin by acknowledging our own contribution We feed one another: those of you looking for publicity and those of us looking for stories." Koppel ended by asking "whether we in the media by our ravenous attention contribute to this phenomenon," and answered: "We did."
  • 1990
    Age 1
    Lloyd Dubroff, Jessica's father, was Lisa Blair Hathaway's common-law husband when Jessica and her brother were born. In 1990 he separated from Hathaway, and in 1991 he married then 19-year-old Melinda Anne Hurst, with whom he had a child in 1992. In December 1992, Hathaway gave birth to Jessica's full sister, Jasmine, conceived while she lived for a time with Lloyd and Melinda in California.
    More Details Hide Details Before his death in the crash, Lloyd Dubroff bought four separate life insurance policies, each for US$750,000. Two of the policies named Hathaway as beneficiary and two named Melinda Dubroff, so that each was to receive $1.5 million in the event of his death, ensuring adequate child support for his underage children living with the two women. His grown son and daughter (both in their 30s), from a previous marriage, were not addressed by these policies. After the crash, Melinda Dubroff sued Hathaway for Hathaway's $1.5 million: Melinda Dubroff's attorney Roy Litherland said in a San Mateo County court that the $1.5 million Hathaway was designated was "in excess of any reasonable level of child support."
  • 1988
    Born
    Born on May 5, 1988.
    More Details Hide Details
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