Jessie Matthews
actress, singer, dancer
Jessie Matthews
Jessie Matthews, OBE was an English actress, dancer and singer of the 1930s, whose career continued into the post-war period.
Biography
Jessie Matthews's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Jessie Matthews
News
News abour Jessie Matthews from around the web
Eleanor L. Pedersen - Wisconsin Rapids Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
7, 1927, in Monroe Center, to Irwin and Jessie (Matthews) York. She graduated from Adams-Friendship High School. Eleanor married Norman Henry Pedersen on April 12, 1946, in Arkdale Trinity Lutheran Church. She worked at Diamonds Grocery Store and later
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Google News article
Sculpted frieze depicted story of a film - The Star
Google News - over 5 years
The building was designed to seat 1800 and opened with Evergreen starring Jessie Matthews. A feature of the programmes to be presented was organ recitals on the mighty Compton organ by Hebron Moreland who came to Doncaster from the Queen's Hall in
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Google News article
DPS finds many trucks fail inspection - KETK
Google News - over 5 years
TYLER - Jessie Matthews is a truck driver making his way through East Texas. He's one of thousands across the state who has to get weighed while hauling their load. The Department of Public Safety recently conducted inspection of nearly 8-thousand
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Google News article
Mvies on tv, Today & Tonight - Regina Leader-Post
Google News - over 5 years
(149) >> "First a Girl" Jessie Matthews. A woman stands in for a female impersonator and becomes a hit. (2 hrs.) (166) >>> "The Rundown" The Rock. A bounty hunter must find his boss' son in the Amazon. (1 hr., 50 mins.) (39) >>> "Angel on My Shoulder"
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Google News article
Celia Lipton - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - almost 6 years
... a London theatre” according to one critic), and in Lionel Monckton's 1944 revival of the light opera, The Quaker Girl, when she stepped in for Jessie Matthews at the last moment and received a dozen curtain calls on opening night at the Coliseum
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THEATER REVIEW; British Gags Run Amok In Pratfalls
NYTimes - almost 14 years
The whole thing is -- let's face it -- too silly for words. So readers should be advised that any descriptions that follow will be to some degree inadequate in capturing the full ecstatic idiocy of ''The Play What I Wrote,'' the very British import of a comedy revue, which opened last night at the Lyceum Theater. Still, it seems safe to say that
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; Singing Speech and Speaking Melody
NYTimes - over 15 years
OPERA at the Metropolitan, and the Broadway musical: separate worlds. Yet in both, these days, work proceeds on an identical challenge: how, exactly, to calibrate the balance between talk and singing. A knotty problem they are wrestling with uptown is Sprechgesang (speech-song) or Sprechstimme (speech-voice), an unlovely coinage associated with the
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DANCE IN REVIEW
NYTimes - almost 17 years
Turning the World On Its Side Keely Garfield Playhouse 91 The Sixth Annual Festival of the 92nd Street Y Harkness Dance Project got off to a witty start with dance by Keely Garfield on Thursday night. Ms. Garfield aptly calls her company Sinister Slapstick. She and her dancers, all expert physical actors as well as deft movers, turned the world
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NYTimes article
DANCE REVIEW; Sisters in Troubled Waters Calmed by a Little Love
NYTimes - almost 17 years
The Sixth Annual Festival of the 92nd Street Y Harkness Dance Project got off to a witty start with a program by Keely Garfield on Thursday night at Playhouse 91. Ms. Garfield aptly calls her company Sinister Slapstick. She and her dancers, all expert physical actors as well as deft movers, turned the world slightly askew in the three new works
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; Stepping Into the Jazz Age with Noel and Twiggy
NYTimes - over 17 years
It seemed as if the 1960's would own her forever in memory, since she bore roughly the same relationship to that decade as the Statue of Liberty does to the United States. Yet Twiggy, the saucer-eyed fashion model whose name became a byword for clothes-hanger skinniness and swinging London, has repeatedly proved that her face, and perhaps her
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - about 20 years
A Paris-moored suspense puzzle, an early 20th-century biodrama, an all-American comedy and a British musical lark provide variety and diversion as standouts on the movie menu this week. In Stanley Donen's CHARADE (1963), an American widow (Audrey Hepburn) in Paris is menaced by a trio of rough crooks as she searches for her husband's fortune. Even
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - about 21 years
FOUR women prove the importance of good casting on the television film roster this week. Claudette Colbert burnishes Cecil B. DeMille's CLEOPATRA (1934) like an Egyptian sunrise. The spectacle master's history is compact, brisk and suggestive. It's also juicier than the Taylor-Burton juggernaut. One sequence takes the cake: a Nile barge seduction,
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Critic's Choice/Film;A Tribute to an Enchanting Dancer
NYTimes - about 21 years
The English movie musical may never have achieved the giddy heights of Busby Berkeley's Hollywood extravaganzas or the high-romantic gloss of the best Astaire-Rogers romps, but it certainly had its moments. One of the most memorable is Jessie Matthews's frothy, swirling solo performance of Rodgers and Hart's "Dancing on the Ceiling" in the 1934
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No Headline
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: FRIDAY GRAND SIGHTS Anyone who has ever visited the Grand Canyon has experienced the awesome grandeur of the four-billion-year-old geologic wonder. The beauty and mystery of the canyon have been captured in a half-hour documentary film, ''Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets,'' which can be seen this month at the Naturemax Theater at the American
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NYTimes article
BOOKS OF THE TIMES
NYTimes - over 31 years
THE GREAT BRITISH PICTURE SHOW. By George Perry. 386 pages. Illustrated. Little, Brown. $19.95. IF a single date can be assigned to the birth of the British cinema, it is 1896, when a pioneer called Birt Acres showed the films he had made the previous year of the Oxford and Cambridge boat race and the Epsom Derby. Acres, though his parents were
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'BRITISH FILM' AT MODERN
NYTimes - over 32 years
The young man was working in a London film studio doing odd jobs and helping to design title cards, but the studio head, a producer, believed in promoting up through the ranks. And so, after serving an apprenticeship, he was given the opportunity to direct a picture himself. The film, which was called ''The Pleasure Garden,'' told the story of two
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Film View; BLAKE EDWARDS-THE PEERLESS FARCEUR
NYTimes - almost 35 years
Farce is difficult to pin down. ''The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary'' says simply that it's ''a dramatic work (usually short) intended only to excite laughter,'' and ''The Oxford Companion to the Theatre'' defines it as ''an extreme form of comedy in which laughter is raised at the expense of probability, particularly by horseplay and bodily
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THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - almost 35 years
NOW that big bands have made a comeback, tap dancing may not be far b ehind. Ruby Keeler, the star of the film ''42d Street,'' was guest o f honor at a party on Tuesday given by George-Paul Rosell at Studio 5 4. The guests at a dinner for 48 beforehand, at the penthouse of Mark Fleischman, the discotheque's owner, included Geoffrey Holder, Carmen
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NYTimes article
JESSIE MATTHEWS DEAD AT 74; STARRED IN MUSICAL COMEDIES
NYTimes - over 35 years
Jessie Matthews, a star of Britain's musical-comedy stage, died of cancer today. She was 74 years old. Miss Matthews won fame on three continents before World War II as a singer and as one of the most graceful and athletic dancers of stage and screen. She was best known to American audiences as the star of such British film musicals of the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jessie Matthews
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1981
    Age 73
    Died on August 19, 1981.
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  • 1979
    Age 71
    She took her one-woman stage show to Los Angeles in 1979 and won the United States Drama Logue Award for the year's best performance in concert.
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  • 1978
    Age 70
    She memorably played Wallis Simpson's "Aunt Bessie" Merriman in the 1978 Thames TV series Edward & Mrs. Simpson.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1958
    Age 50
    With Hale she had one adopted daughter, Catherine Hale-Monro, who married Count Donald Grixoni on 15 November 1958; they eventually divorced but she remained known as Catherine, Countess Grixoni.
    More Details Hide Details Matthews suffered from periods of ill-health throughout her life and eventually died of cancer, aged 74. She is buried at St Martin's Church, Ruislip. For a number of years, British film exhibitors voted her among the top ten stars in Britain at the box office via an annual poll in the Motion Picture Herald. Matthews was the subject of This Is Your Life in 1961, and a posthumous biography from the BBC's 40 Minutes (1987), Catch A Fallen Star. A memorial plaque on her childhood dance venue, 22 Berwick Street, Soho, was unveiled on 3 May 1995 by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Ruthie Henshall.
    After a few false starts as a straight actress she played Tom Thumb's mother in the 1958 children's film, and during the 1960s found new fame when she took over the leading role of Mary Dale in the BBC's long-running daily radio soap, The Dales, formerly Mrs Dale's Diary.
    More Details Hide Details Live theatre and variety shows remained the mainstay of Matthews' work through the 1950s and 1960s, with successful tours of Australia and South Africa interspersed with periods of less glamorous but welcome work in British provincial theatre and pantomimes. She became a stalwart nostalgia feature of TV variety shows such as The Night of a Thousand Stars and The Good Old Days. Jessie Matthews was awarded an OBE in 1970 and continued to make cabaret and occasional film and television appearances through the decade including one-off guest roles in the popular BBC series Angels and an episode of the ITV mystery anthology Tales of the Unexpected.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1934
    Age 26
    It took some time for Matthews' popularity to recover from this scandal. "If I ceased to be a star", she wrote in a piece for Picturegoer in 1934, "all that interest in my home life would evaporate, I believe.
    More Details Hide Details Perhaps it is the price one has to pay for being a star". Her second and longest marriage (1931-1944) was to actor-director Sonnie Hale; the third to military officer, Lt. Brian Lewis, both marriages ending in divorce.
  • 1930
    Age 22
    Matthews' fame reached its initial height with her lead role in Charles B. Cochran's 1930 stage production of Ever Green, premiered at the Alhambra Theatre Glasgow, a musical by Rodgers and Hart that was partly inspired by the life of music hall star Marie Lloyd, and her daughter's tribute act resurrection of her mother's acclaimed Edwardian stage show as Marie Lloyd Junior.
    More Details Hide Details At its time Ever Green, which included the first major revolving stage in Britain, was the most expensive musical ever mounted on a British stage. The 1934 cinematic adaptation featured the newly composed song Over My Shoulder which was to go on to become Matthews' personal theme song, later giving its title to her autobiography and to a 21st-century musical stage show of her life. Her distinctive warbling voice and round cheeks made her a familiar and much-loved personality to British theatre and film audiences at the beginning of World War II, but her popularity waned in the 1940s after several years' absence from the screen followed by an unsatisfactory thriller, Candles at Nine. Post-war audiences associated her with a world of hectic pre-war luxury that was now seen as obsolete in austerity-era Britain.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1926
    Age 18
    In 1926 she married the first of her three husbands, actor Henry Lytton, Jr., the son of singer and actress Louie Henri and Sir Henry Lytton the doyen of the Savoy Theatre. They divorced in 1929.
    More Details Hide Details Matthews had several romantic relationships conducted in the public eye, often courting controversy in the newspapers. The most notorious was her relationship with the married Sonnie Hale. A high-court judge denounced her as an "odious" individual when her love letters to Hale were used as evidence in the case of his divorce from his wife, actress/singer Evelyn 'Boo' Laye.
  • 1919
    Age 11
    She went on stage on 29 December 1919, aged 12, in Bluebell in Fairyland, by Seymour Hicks, music by Walter Slaughter and lyrics by Charles Taylor, at the Metropolitan Music Hall, Edgware Road, London, as a child dancer; she made her film debut in 1923 in the silent film The Beloved Vagabond.
    More Details Hide Details Matthews was in the chorus in Charlot's Review of 1924 in London. She went with the show to New York, where she was also understudy to the star, Gertrude Lawrence. The show moved to Toronto, and when Lawrence fell ill she took over the role and was given great reviews. Matthews was acclaimed in the United Kingdom as a dancer and as the first performer of numerous popular songs of the 1920s and 1930s, including "A Room with a View" by Noël Coward and "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love" by Cole Porter. After a string of hit stage musicals and films in the mid-1930s, Matthews developed a following in the USA, where she was dubbed "The Dancing Divinity". Her British studio was reluctant to let go of its biggest name, which resulted in offers for her to work in Hollywood being repeatedly rejected.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1907
    Born
    Born on March 11, 1907.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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