Jim Steranko
Artist
Jim Steranko
James F. "Jim" Steranko is an American graphic artist, comic book writer/artist, historian, magician, publisher and film production illustrator. His most famous comic book work was with the 1960s superspy feature "Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. " in Marvel Comics' Strange Tales and in the subsequent eponymous series.
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Artist Turns iTunes Terms Of Service Into Badass Comics
Huffington Post - over 1 year
"Awesome" and "inspiring" probably aren't the words that leap to mind when you scroll through Apple's iTunes contract -- but that's about to change. Artist Robert Sikoryak has been converting the "unabridged" legal text you agree to when installing iTunes into a series of gorgeous comic parodies on a Tumblr called "iTunes Terms and Conditions: The Graphic Novel." He posts a new page every day and expects the series to run for a total of 94 pages. Each image is a sendup of work from legendary comic artists like Will Eisner and Jim Steranko. (Some perhaps less legendary but still famous creators are parodied, as well, like Garfield's Jim Davis.) Sikoryak shared a sample of his work with The Huffington Post that you can feast your eyes on below. If nothing else, these comics serve to highlight both the absurdity of iTunes' terms and the immense talent of Sikoryak, who's perhaps best known for Masterpiece Comics. Check it out: -- This feed and its contents are the property o ...
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Huffington Post article
Legendary 'S.H.I.E.L.D.' Creator Jim Steranko Takes Aim At New TV Series
MTV News - over 3 years
by Brett White Fans of comic book legend Jim Steranko's endlessly entertaining Twitter feed will be delighted to know that he's been enlisted by The Hollywood Reporter to review every episode of "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.," the new TV series loosely based on the series he spearheaded in the late '60s. It's not everyday that you get in-depth reviews of comic adaptations from their classic creators, so this new weekly feature is kind of fascinating, especially when you consider that an iconic figure like Steranko has no real reason to play nice with big companies or censor his opinions (his uncensored thoughts are one of the major draws of his Twitter feed). With The Hollywood Reporter providing a platform, the 74-year-old writer and artist voiced his highly critical take on Tuesday's pilot in a lengthy review. His first major critique is one that makes a lot of sense. "One of the pitfalls of multicharacter epics with multiple storylines is juggling each to dramatic sa ...
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MTV News article
Best Shots Reviews: PUNISHER, DARK HORSE PRESENTS, More - Newsarama
Google News - over 5 years
Red Tide Chapter 1: Jim Steranko's story just drips noir. Even from this opening chapter, you can see how this graphic novel has influenced everyone from Frank Miller to Ed Brubaker. What will be up for debate with this book is the term "graphic novel"
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Google News article
Nick Fury: Agent of SHIELD (fancast) - Comic Book Movie
Google News - over 5 years
A fan cast of a Nick Fury movie set in the late 1960s, based on Jim Steranko's stories. Nick Fury first appeared as the lead character in the war adventure series Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #1 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, as a Sergeant in the
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Google News article
In Wednesday's comics, Batman goes VR and kung fu fighters go nuts - io9
Google News - over 5 years
As for the rest of the grab bag, you'll see new issues of Uncanny X-Force, Dark Horse Presents (which showcases work by Dave Gibbons and Jim Steranko), Chew, American Vampire, FF, Punisher, and Kick-Ass 2. The standout release this week is Kagan
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Google News article
DC Fifty-Too: Cartoonists Create Their Own DC Comics Relaunch [Art] - ComicsAlliance
Google News - over 5 years
Marra's comic books have drawn comparison to mainstream masters Jim Steranko and Paul Gulacy as well as underground comix legends R. Crumb and Spain Rodriguez. Marra's illustration work has been recognized by The Society of Illustrators, The Society of
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Google News article
Abrams to feature art of Star Wars comics in new book this October - Comic Book Resources
Google News - over 5 years
It will also feature newly commissioned art by 20 creators, including John Cassady, Sam Kieth, Mike Mignola, Paul Pope, Frank Quitely, Jim Steranko and, as seen above, JH Williams III. “I wanted something that was a new character of my creation,” the
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Vanguard Publishing Features Jim Steranko, Bill Sienkiewicz, Bela Lugosi Jr ... - openPR (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
The festivities included appearances by revolutionary Captain America artist-writer Jim Steranko; ground-breaking, Emmy Award-nominated graphic novelist, Bill Sienkiewicz; Bela Lugosi Jr.; and a special exhibit of works by the late, great fantasy art
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Book Review: Conspiracy of the Planet of the Apes - The Trades
Google News - over 5 years
The book kicks off with a Jim Steranko cover and features work from Joe Jusko, Dave Dorman, Mark Texeira, Brian Rood, and plenty more. The book looks like a graphic novel, but it's actually nearly 270 pages of prose mixed in with these brilliant images
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Google News article
Cal Slayton's Cartooning Conveys Heroic Hips and Sly Smiles [Art] - ComicsAlliance
Google News - over 5 years
Scope out Slayton's Polaris cover, too, where he really shows off his mastery of the Kirby Krackle in an homage to Jim Steranko. He certainly knows how to lay some colors down and fill out all of that white space
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Google News article
Editorial: 2011 San Diego Comic Con An Epic Journey (Part 2) - The Trades
Google News - over 5 years
Then it was back to Archaia where cover artist Jim Steranko and writer Andrew Gaska were signing “Conspiracy of the Planet of the Apes." It was a pleasure talking with Gaska about how well the story was connecting up with the original film series
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Google News article
Previews: What looks good for September - Comic Book Resources
Google News - over 5 years
And when they say it's illustrated, they're talking about folks like Jim Steranko, Joe Jusko, and Dave Dorman. This is a must-have. Rust – Life on a small farm is disrupted by a boy with a jetpack who's fleeing a giant robot
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Google News article
LE COIN DU PATRIMOINE US : Captain America (2ème partie) - BdZoom
Google News - over 5 years
Kirby va œuvrer sur une dizaine d'épisodes tous excellents, encrés principalement par Syd Shores, son continuateur à la Timely, avant de laisser la main à Jim Steranko, John Romita (qui reprend également du service), Gene Colan..., toujours sur des
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Google News article
Comic-Con International announces Saturday programming - Comic Book Resources
Google News - over 5 years
In between you'll find a tribute to Harvey Pekar, as well as spotlight panels on Jerry Robinson, Ernie Chan, Jim Steranko, Terry Moore, Anders Nilsen, Robert Kirkman, Peter Kuper, Jamal Igle, Garth Ennis, J. Michael Straczynski, Mell Lazarus,
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Google News article
Your Wednesday Sequence 18 | Dave Gibbons - Comic Book Resources
Google News - over 5 years
The Dave Gibbons page above is one of the all-time great dream scenes, up there with Jim Steranko's psychedelic muraling in Captain America and Winsor McCay's all-time champion fantasies on Little Nemo. Here, as always in Watchmen, Gibbons stays within
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Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jim Steranko
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2012
    Age 73
    In 2012, he did poster art for RZG Comics and a variant cover for DC's Before Watchmen: Rorschach #1.
    More Details Hide Details For the movie industry, Steranko has done sketches for movie posters, and was a conceptual artist on Steven Spielberg's Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), doing production designs for the film and designing the character of Indiana Jones. He also served in a similar capacity as "project conceptualist" on Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992), and wrote the episode "The Ties That Bind" of the DC Comics animated TV series Justice League Unlimited. In 2003, Steranko was interviewed by the History Channel for the documentary titled Comic Book Superheroes Unmasked. He has "amassed an enormous portfolio of more than sixty projects (which he called the 'Theater of Concepts') designed to be seen in multimedia form". In a joint venture with Marvel Comics and Diamond Comic Distributors, Vanguard Productions in 2002 sponsored Steranko's "The Spirit of America" benefit print, created to fund an art scholarship "for victims of anti-American terrorism".
  • 2008
    Age 69
    In 2008, he worked with Radical Comics, doing covers, character and logo designs for its Hercules: The Thracian Wars title and Ryder on the Storm.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1997
    Age 58
    A 1997 attempt to negotiate Steranko's return to S.H.I.E.L.D. did not bear fruit.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1981
    Age 42
    Aside from occasional covers and pinup illustrations, he has rarely worked in comics since, although he did illustrate a serialized comics adaptation of the Peter Hyams 1981 sci-fi thriller Outland for Heavy Metal magazine.
    More Details Hide Details His only major work for DC Comics appeared in Superman #400 (Oct. 1984), the 10-page story "The Exile at the Edge of Eternity," which he wrote, drew, colored and lettered.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1976
    Age 37
    Steranko wrote, drew, and produced the illustrated novel Chandler: Red Tide in 1976, for Byron Preiss Visual Publications / Pyramid Books.
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  • 1972
    Age 33
    Through Supergraphics he also published the magazine Comixscene, which premiered with a December 1972 cover date as a folded-tabloid periodical on stiff, non-glossy paper, reporting on the comics field.
    More Details Hide Details It evolved in stages into Mediascene (beginning with issue #7, Dec. 1973) and ultimately into Prevue (beginning with #41, Aug. 1980), a general-interest, standard format, popular culture magazine, running through 1994.
  • 1970
    Age 31
    In 1970 and 1972, Supergraphics published two tabloid-sized volumes entitled The Steranko History of Comics, a planned six-volume history of the American comics industry, though no subsequent volumes have appeared.
    More Details Hide Details Written by Steranko, with hundreds of black-and-white cover reproductions as well as a complete reprint of one The Spirit story by Will Eisner, it included some of the first and in some cases only interviews with numerous creators from the 1930s and 1940s Golden Age of Comic Books. Supergraphics projects included the proposed Talon the Timeless, illustrations of which appeared in a portfolio published in witzend magazine #5, and a pinup girl calendar, "The Supergirls", consisting of 12 illustrations of sexy superheroines in costumes recalling such superheroes as Captain America and Green Lantern.
  • 1969
    Age 30
    Steranko also formed his own publishing company, Supergraphics, in 1969, and the following year worked with writer-entrepreneur Byron Preiss on an anti-drug comic book, The Block, distributed to elementary schools nationwide.
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    Steranko then branched into other areas of publishing, including most notably book-cover illustration. Lacking any experience as a painter, his decision to effectively quit comics in 1969 led him to "an artist friend who earned his living as a painter", from whom Steranko obtained an "hour-long lecture", and the suggestion that he work in acrylics rather than oils, for the sake of speed.
    More Details Hide Details From these inauspicious beginnings, he compiled a portfolio of half a dozen paintings ("two Westerns, two pin-up girls, two gothic horror and one sword-and-sorcery") and met with Lancer Books' art director Howard Winters, to whom he immediately sold his fantasy piece. This led to a career illustrating dozens of paperback covers, popularly including those of Pyramid Books' reissues of the 1930s pulp novels of The Shadow. When DC Comics gained the comic book publishing rights to The Shadow, they contacted Steranko to work on the new series but ultimately chose Dennis O'Neil and Michael Kaluta to produce the title instead.
    In a contemporaneous interview, conducted November 14, 1969, Steranko reflected on the tiff:
    More Details Hide Details Summing up this initial stint in comics, Steranko said in 1979, Steranko returned briefly to Marvel, contributing a romance story ("My Heart Broke in Hollywood", Our Love Story #5, Feb. 1970) and becoming the cover artist for 15 comics beginning with Doc Savage #2–3, Shanna the She-Devil #1–2, and Supernatural Thrillers #1–2 (each successively cover-dated Dec. 1972 and Feb. 1973), and ending with the reprint comic Nick Fury and his Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. #2 (April 1973). In 1973, Steranko became founding editor of Marvel's official fan magazine, FOOM, which superseded the two previous official fan clubs, the Merry Marvel Marching Society and Marvelmania. Steranko served as editor and also produced the covers for the magazine's inaugural four issues before being succeeded editorially by Tony Isabella. He had previously been associated with Marvelmania, producing two of the club's 12 posters.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1966
    Age 27
    Steranko also approached Marvel Comics in 1966.
    More Details Hide Details He met with editor Stan Lee, who had Steranko ink a two-page Jack Kirby sample of typical art for the superspy feature "Nick Fury Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.". Steranko self-published it in 1970 in the limited-edition "Steranko Portfolio One"; it appeared again 30 years later in slightly altered form in the 2000 trade-paperback collection Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. This led to Lee's assigning him the Nick Fury feature in Strange Tales, a "split book" that shared each issue with another feature. Future Marvel editor-in-chief Roy Thomas, then a staff writer, recalled, Lee and Kirby had initiated the 12-page "Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D." feature in Strange Tales #135 (Aug. 1965), with Kirby supplying such inventive and enduring gadgets and hardware as the Helicarrier – an airborne aircraft carrier – as well as LMDs (Life Model Decoys) and even automobile airbags. Marvel's all-purpose terrorist organization HYDRA was introduced here as well. Steranko began his stint on the feature by penciling and inking "finishes" over Kirby layouts in Strange Tales #151 (Dec. 1966), just as many fellow new Marvel artists did at the time. Two issues later, Steranko took over full penciling and also began drawing the every-other-issue "Nick Fury" cover art. Then, in a rarity for comics artists, he took over the series' writing with #155 (April 1967), following Roy Thomas, who had succeeded Lee.
    In 1966, he landed assignments at Harvey Comics under editor Joe Simon, who as one writer described was "trying to create a line of super heroes within a publishing company that had specialized in anthropomorphic animals."
    More Details Hide Details Here Steranko created and wrote the characters Spyman, Magicmaster and the Gladiator for the company's short-lived superhero line, Harvey Thriller. His first published comics art came in Spyman #1 (Sept. 1966), for which he wrote the 20-page story "The Birth of a Hero" and penciled the first page, which included a diagram of a robotic hand that was reprinted as an inset on artist George Tuska's cover.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1957
    Age 18
    He initially entered the comics industry in 1957, not long out of high school, working for a short time inking pencil art by Vince Colletta and Matt Baker in Colletta's New York City studio before returning to Reading.
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  • 1956
    Age 17
    Steranko, whose first band, in 1956, was called The Lancers, did not perform under his own name, claiming he used pseudonyms to help protect himself from enemies.
    More Details Hide Details He also claims to have put the first go-go girls onstage. The seminal rock and roll group Bill Haley and his Comets was based in nearby Philadelphia and Steranko, who played a Jazzmaster guitar, often performed in the same local venues, sometimes on the same bill, and became friendly with Haley guitarist Frank Beecher, who became a musical influence. By the late 1960s, Steranko was a member of a New York City magicians' group, the Witchdoctor's Club. Comics historian Mark Evanier notes that the influential comic-book creator Jack Kirby, who "based some of his characters... on people in his life or in the news", was "inspired" to create the escape artist character Mister Miracle "by an earlier career of writer-artist Jim Steranko". During the day, Steranko made his living as an artist for a printing company in his hometown of Reading, designing and drawing pamphlets and flyers for local dance clubs and the like. He moved on after five years to join an advertising agency, where he designed ads and drew products ranging from "baby carriages to beer cans". Interested in writing and drawing for comic books, he visited DC Comics as a fan and was treated to a tour of the office by editor Julius Schwartz, who gave Steranko a copy of a script featuring the science-fiction adventurer Adam Strange. Steranko recalled in 2003, "It was the first full script I'd ever seen, complete with panel descriptions and dialogue.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1938
    Born
    Born on November 5, 1938.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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