Joan Blondell
actress
Joan Blondell
Rose Joan Blondell was an American actress who performed in movies and on television for five decades as Joan Blondell. After winning a beauty pageant, Blondell embarked upon a film career. Establishing herself as a sexy wisecracking blonde, she was a pre-Code staple of Warner Brothers and appeared in more than 100 movies and television productions.
Biography
Joan Blondell's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Joan Blondell
News
News abour Joan Blondell from around the web
Pat O'Brien, 'Kill the Irishman' DVD reviews - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
After a gossip columnist reports, on Quinn's bogus information, that Joan Blondell celebrated her birthday at the nightclub, he gripes to Quinn that Blondell is suing him. (The columnist is also a real-life person, Jimmy Fidler, playing himself in a
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Joan Blondell Q&A Pt.4: John Cassavetes' OPENING NIGHT, Transsexualism in THE ... - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Though I know that Joan Blondell and Ann Sothern were quite different as performers, they often played no-nonsense, wisecracking dames in lots of programmers — Blondell at WB, Sothern at RKO and then MGM. Now, Sothern became an A-list player at MGM in
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Joan Blondell on TCM: DAMES, WILL SUCCESS SPOIL ROCK HUNTER? - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Joan Blondell has always been a favorite of mine, much like fellow wisecracking 1930s Warner Bros. players Aline MacMahon and Glenda Farrell. The fact that Blondell never became a top star says more about audiences — who preferred, say, Shirley Temple
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Humphrey Bogart Movie Schedule: BEAT THE DEVIL, TOKYO JOE - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Edward G. Robinson, Joan Blondell, Barton MacLane. BW-82 mins. 8:30 AM SAN QUENTIN (1937) A convict's sister falls for the captain of the prison guards. Dir: Lloyd Bacon. Cast: Pat O'Brien, Humphrey Bogart, Ann Sheridan. BW-70 mins
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Ann Dvorak Pt.4: Warner Bros. Co-Stars, THREE ON A MATCH - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Could you tell us a little about that film, and about Dvorak's relationship with director Mervyn LeRoy, and fellow players Joan Blondell and Bette Davis? Three on a Match is a compact and gritty pre-Code gem. At sixty-three minutes running time,
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Ann Dvorak Movie Schedule: THREE ON A MATCH, OUR VERY OWN, COLLEGE COACH - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Another cool Ann Dvorak performance is her drug addict in Mervyn LeRoy's Three on a Match (1932), which features a great cast that includes Warren William, Joan Blondell, and a pre-stardom Bette Davis. Never, ever light three cigarettes using the same
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John Garfield on TCM: HUMORESQUE, THE BREAKING POINT, WE WERE STRANGERS - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Come to think of it, even Warners' women were tough: Bette Davis, Ann Sheridan, Ida Lupino, Joan Blondell, Aline MacMahon, Glenda Farrell, and, off screen, Olivia de Havilland and Joan Leslie (both of whom fought Jack Warner for better roles)
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Extra Shows Added for "Grease Sing-A-Long" at Cerrito Theater - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
The faculty and staff of Rydell High is packed with actors of comic genius, including Sid Caesar, Eve Arden, Joan Blondell, and Dody Goodman. A panoply of classic rock 'n roll hits is performed by Sha Na Na, and there is a cameo by Franklie Avalon
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DVD Geek: Tracy & Hepburn The Definitive Collection - Movie City News
Google News - over 5 years
Hepburn runs the department (with Joan Blondell and Dina Merrill), and Gig Young his her not-in-a-hurry-to-get-hitched boyfriend. Despite the 2.35:1 letterboxed image, the staging is static, with little more than a couple of sets
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In praise of Joan Blondell - Freeport Journal-Standard (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Over at the Turner Classic Movies Movie Morlocks blog, writer "suzidoll" pens a tribute to one of my favorite actresses, the late, great Joan Blondell, who brought plenty of sass and spunk to the movies of Warner Bros., especially those
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1937's "Topper" starring Cary Grant at Rave Motion Pictures in Davenport - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Having been reunited by the ghost of Marion Kerby in “Topper Takes a Trip” the couple finds themselves with a new ghost played by Joan Blondell and attempting to stop a murder. “Topper” fans can see “Topper Returns” on Monday, June 20th at Rave Motion
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Harrell became Columbia's new city manager 10 YEARS AGO - Columbia Daily Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
Uptown: “Sons O' Guns,” starring Joe E. Brown and Joan Blondell. Varsity: “Petticoat Fever,” with Robert Montgomery and Myrna Loy. Hall: “Private Number” with heartthrob Robert Taylor and Loretta Young. Missouri: “Early to Bed” with Charlie Ruggles and
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Looking Back: Nobles Cooperative Electric organized 75 years ago this week - Worthington Daily Globe
Google News - over 5 years
The new State Theatre on Worthington's Third Avenue was opened to the public with appropriate ceremony by Henry J. Hower, with the world premiere of the extravaganza, “Sons of Guns,” starring Joe E. Brown and Joan Blondell. In an endeavor to insure the
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Iš kur atsirado blondinės? - DELFI
Google News - over 5 years
Šviesūs plaukai tapo kultu tuometinėje pop kultūroje, kuri maitino žiūrovus tokiomis aktorėmis kaip Jean Harlow, kuri 1930 metais buvo sekso simbolis Amerikoje, Joan Blondell, Carole Lombard, Barbara Lawrence. Vėliau kino ekranuose pasirodė Kim Novak,
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WILL SUCCESS SPOIL ROCK HUNTER? Blu-ray Review - Twitch
Google News - almost 6 years
You'll also get Ms. Joan Blondell, star of Nightmare Alley and of Opening Night, who rounds out the package as Ms. Marlowe's assistant and handler -- as they say in Paris, quel package! Frank Tashlin is not a name that usually comes up when talking
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Revival Circuit/DVD Extra: Ron Hutchinson, Vitaphone's matchmaker ... - New York Post (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
"Convention City'' (1933), a famously racy comedy with Joan Blondell and Dick Powell "is the newest major feature for which no sound or picture elements are known to exist,'' Hutchinson says. He's debunked long-standing rumors that the film was
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joan Blondell
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1979
    Age 72
    Blondell died of leukemia in Santa Monica, California, on Christmas Day, 1979, with her children and her sister at her bedside.
    More Details Hide Details She is interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.
  • 1974
    Age 67
    In 1974, Blondell played the wife of Tom D'Andrea's character in the television film, Bobby Parker and Company, with Ted Bessell in the starring role as the son of Blondell and D'Andrea.
    More Details Hide Details Coincidentally, D'Andrea had earlier played Jim Gillis, the television husband of Blondell's younger sister, Gloria Blondell, in the NBC sitcom The Life of Riley. Blondell has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to motion pictures, at 6309 Hollywood Boulevard. In December 2007, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City mounted a retrospective of Blondell's films in connection with a new biography by film professor Matthew Kennedy and theatrical revival houses such as Film Forum in Manhattan have also projected many of her films recently. She wrote a novel titled Center Door Fancy (New York: Delacorte Press, 1972), which was a thinly disguised autobiography with veiled references to June Allyson and Dick Powell.
  • 1972
    Age 65
    In 1972, she had an ongoing supporting role in the NBC series Banyon as Peggy Revere, who operated a secretarial school in the same building as Banyon's detective agency.
    More Details Hide Details This was a 1930s period action drama starring Robert Forster in the titular role. Her students worked in Banyon's office, providing fresh faces for the show weekly. The series was replaced midseason.
  • 1968
    Age 61
    Blondell continued working on television. In 1968, she guest-starred on the CBS sitcom Family Affair, starring Brian Keith.
    More Details Hide Details She also replaced Bea Benaderet, who was ill, for one episode on the CBS series Petticoat Junction. In that installment, Blondell played FloraBelle Campbell, a lady visitor to Hooterville, who had once dated Uncle Joe (Edgar Buchanan) and Sam Drucker (Frank Cady). That same year, Blondell co-starred in the ABC Western series Here Come the Brides, set in the Pacific Northwest of the 19th century. Her co-stars included singer Bobby Sherman and actor-singer David Soul. Blondell received two consecutive Emmy nominations for outstanding continued performance by an actress in a dramatic series for her role as Lottie Hatfield.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1965
    Age 58
    In 1965, she was in the running to replace Vivian Vance as Lucille Ball's sidekick on the hit CBS television comedy series The Lucy Show.
    More Details Hide Details Unfortunately, after filming her second guest appearance as Joan Brenner (Lucy's new friend from California), Blondell walked off the set right after the episode had completed filming when Ball humiliated her by harshly criticizing her performance in front of the studio audience and technicians.
  • 1963
    Age 56
    She guest-starred in the episode "You're All Right, Ivy" of Jack Palance's circus drama, The Greatest Show on Earth, which aired on ABC in the 1963—1964 television season.
    More Details Hide Details Her co-stars in the segment were Joe E. Brown and Buster Keaton.
    Blondell also guest-starred in various television programs, including three 1963 episodes as the character Aunt Win in the CBS sitcom The Real McCoys, starring Walter Brennan and Richard Crenna.
    More Details Hide Details She appeared in a 1964 episode ("What's in the Box?") of The Twilight Zone.
  • FORTIES
  • 1950
    Age 43
    Blondell returned to Hollywood in 1950.
    More Details Hide Details Her performance in her next film, The Blue Veil (1951), earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in a Supporting Role. She played supporting roles in The Opposite Sex (1956), Desk Set (1957), and Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957). She received considerable acclaim for her performance as Lady Fingers in Norman Jewison's The Cincinnati Kid (1965), garnering a Golden Globe nomination and National Board of Review win for Best Supporting Actress. John Cassavetes cast her as a cynical, aging playwright in his film Opening Night (1977). Blondell was widely seen in two films released not long before her death, Grease (1978) and the remake of The Champ (1979) with Jon Voight and Rick Schroder. She also appeared in two films released after her death, The Glove (1979) and The Woman Inside (1981).
  • 1948
    Age 41
    In 1948, she left the screen for three years and concentrated on theatre, performing in summer stock and touring with Cole Porter's musical, Something for the Boys.
    More Details Hide Details She later reprised her role of Aunt Cissy in the musical version of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn for the national tour, starred opposite Tallulah Bankhead in the play Crazy October (which closed on the road) and played the nagging mother, Mae Peterson, in the national tour of Bye Bye Birdie.
  • 1947
    Age 40
    On July 5, 1947, Blondell married her third husband, producer Mike Todd, whom she divorced in 1950.
    More Details Hide Details Her marriage to Todd was an emotional and financial disaster. She once accused him of holding her outside a hotel window by her ankles. He was also a heavy spender who lost hundreds of thousands of dollars gambling (high-stakes bridge was one of his weaknesses) and went through a controversial bankruptcy during their marriage. An often-repeated myth is that Mike Todd "dumped" Joan Blondell for Elizabeth Taylor, when in fact, Blondell left Todd of her own accord years before he met Taylor.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1945
    Age 38
    She was well received in her later films, despite being relegated to character and supporting roles after 1945, when she was billed below the title for the first time in 14 years in Adventure, which starred Clark Gable and Greer Garson.
    More Details Hide Details She was also featured prominently in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) and Nightmare Alley (1947).
  • 1944
    Age 37
    Blondell and Powell were divorced on July 14, 1944.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1943
    Age 36
    In 1943, Blondell returned to Broadway as the star of Mike Todd's short-lived production of The Naked Genius, a comedy written by Gypsy Rose Lee.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1939
    Age 32
    She left Warner Bros. in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1937
    Age 30
    In 1937, she starred opposite Errol Flynn in The Perfect Specimen.
    More Details Hide Details By the end of the decade, she had made nearly 50 films.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1936
    Age 29
    On September 19, 1936, she married her second husband, actor, director, and singer Dick Powell.
    More Details Hide Details They had a daughter, Ellen Powell, who became a studio hair stylist, and Powell adopted her son by her previous marriage under the name Norman Scott Powell.
  • 1933
    Age 26
    Blondell was married three times, first to cinematographer George Barnes in a private wedding ceremony on January 4, 1933, at the First Presbyterian Church in Phoenix, Arizona. They had one child — Norman Scott Barnes, who became an accomplished producer, director, and television executive — and divorced in 1936.
    More Details Hide Details
    Her stirring rendition of "Remember My Forgotten Man" in the Busby Berkeley production of Gold Diggers of 1933, in which she co-starred with Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler, became an anthem for the frustrations of the unemployed and the government's failed economic policies.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1931
    Age 24
    She began to appear in short subjects, and was named as one of the WAMPAS Baby Stars in 1931.
    More Details Hide Details Blondell was paired with James Cagney in such films as Sinners' Holiday (1930) – the film version of Penny Arcade – and The Public Enemy (1931), and was one-half of a gold-digging duo with Glenda Farrell in nine films. During the Great Depression, Blondell was one of the highest-paid individuals in the United States.
  • 1930
    Age 23
    In 1930, she starred with James Cagney in Penny Arcade.
    More Details Hide Details Penny Arcade only lasted three weeks, but Al Jolson saw it and bought the rights to the play for $20,000. He then sold the rights to Warner Bros. with the proviso that Blondell and Cagney be cast in the film version. Placed under contract by Warner Bros., she moved to Hollywood, where studio boss Jack L. Warner wanted her to change her name to "Inez Holmes", but Blondell refused.
  • 1927
    Age 20
    Around 1927, she returned to New York, joined a stock company to become an actress, and performed on Broadway.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1926
    Age 19
    Under the name Rosebud Blondell, she won the 1926 Miss Dallas pageant, was a finalist in an early version of the Miss Universe pageant in May 1926, and placed fourth for Miss America in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in September of that same year.
    More Details Hide Details She attended what is now the University of North Texas, then a teacher's college, in Denton, where her mother was a local stage actress, and she worked as a fashion model, a circus hand, and a clerk in a New York store.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1909
    Age 2
    Rose Joan Blondell was born in New York to a vaudeville family, and gave her birthdate as August 30, 1909.
    More Details Hide Details Her father, known as Ed Blondell, was born in Indiana in 1866 to French parents, and was a vaudeville comedian and one of the original Katzenjammer Kids. Blondell's mother was Kathryn ("Katie") Cain, born April 13, 1884, in Brooklyn, of Irish American parents. Her younger sister, Gloria Blondell, also an actress, was briefly married to film producer Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli. Blondell also had a brother, Ed Blondell, Jr. Her cradle was a property trunk as her parents moved from place to place and she made her first appearance on stage at the age of four months when she was carried on in a cradle as the daughter of Peggy Astaire in The Greatest Love. Her family comprised a vaudeville troupe, the "Bouncing Blondells". Joan had spent a year in Honolulu (1914–15) and six years in Australia and had seen much of the world by the time her family, who had been on tour, settled in Dallas, Texas, when she was a teenager.
  • 1906
    Born
    Born on August 30, 1906.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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