Joan Caulfield
American actor and model
Joan Caulfield
Joan Caulfield was an American actress and former fashion model. After being discovered by Broadway producers, she began a stage career in 1943 that eventually led to signing as an actress with Paramount Pictures.
Biography
Joan Caulfield's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Joan Caulfield
News
News abour Joan Caulfield from around the web
Cranky Hanke's Screening Room: Der Bingle on DVD - Mountain Xpress
Google News - over 5 years
This has the advantage of allowing Bing to have a romance—with Joan Caulfield. Welcome Stranger adheres pretty closely to its model. It's not just that Bing and Barry are at loggerheads in a kind of generation gap once again
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Google News article
Photo Flash: DEAR RUTH Opens At Spoon Theater - Broadway World
Google News - almost 6 years
The play was turned into a film of the same name, starring William Holden and Joan Caulfield. Legend has it that when JD Salinger saw the film's billboard, he decided to name his Catcher in the Rye protagonist Holden Caulfield
Article Link:
Google News article
DVDS; Just Like the Ones You Used to Know
NYTimes - about 6 years
BING CROSBY died in 1977, but that can seem hard to believe during the holiday season. This great singer -- one of the principal architects of American pop and very likely the most successful entertainer of the 20th century -- lives on during the four weeks from Thanksgiving to Christmas. Crooning ''White Christmas,''''Jingle Bells'' or ''Silent
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NYTimes article
Shylock To Sherlock A Study In Names
NYTimes - about 20 years
In 1886, the British writer Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a short story about a private detective named Sherrinford Holmes who, when speaking to his sidekick, a retired British army surgeon named Ormond Sacker, made light of his ingenious solutions to crime puzzles with the remark, ''Elementary, my dear Sacker.'' Something was wrong with that. Neither
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NYTimes article
Corrections
NYTimes - over 25 years
An obituary yesterday about Joan Caulfield, the actress, reversed the identities of the male stars in two films. Bing Crosby starred in "Blue Skies," Bob Hope in "Monsieur Beaucaire."
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NYTimes article
Joan Caulfield, A Film Actress, Is Dead at 69
NYTimes - over 25 years
Joan Caulfield, an actress who starred in films of the 1940's and in television situation comedies of the 1950's, died on Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She was 69 years old and lived in Beverly Hills, Calif. She died of cancer, a hospital spokesman said. Miss Caulfield was propelled to stardom by the films "Monsieur
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NYTimes article
Elisa Bialk, 81, Dies; Wrote for Magazines
NYTimes - almost 27 years
LEAD: Elisa Bialk Krautter, who wrote under the the name Elisa Bialk, died of cancer last Wednesday at Hilton Head Hospital on Hilton Head Island, S.C. She was 81 years old and lived on the island. Elisa Bialk Krautter, who wrote under the the name Elisa Bialk, died of cancer last Wednesday at Hilton Head Hospital on Hilton Head Island, S.C. She
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Frank Ross, 85; Producer of Films Made 'The Robe'
NYTimes - almost 27 years
LEAD: Frank Ross, a film producer whose credits included ''Of Mice and Men'' and the first wide-screen movie, ''The Robe,'' died of complications after brain surgery on Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 85 years old. ''The Robe,'' a biblical epic that took Mr. Ross 10 years to bring to the screen, had its premiere in 1953
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NYTimes article
SUMMER READING; RISES AT DAWN, WRITES, THEN RETIRES
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: IN SEARCH OF J. D. SALINGER By Ian Hamilton. 222 pp. New York: Random House. $17.95. IN SEARCH OF J. D. SALINGER By Ian Hamilton. 222 pp. New York: Random House. $17.95. ''What really knocks me out,'' says Holden Caulfield in ''The Catcher in the Rye,'' ''is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a
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NYTimes article
Whose Words Are They, Anyway?
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: IN the past 20 years, J. D. Salinger has undoubtedly become the most famous - as well as the most read - recluse in the world. He has rarely been sighted in public, has not given an interview since 1953 and, although he continues to write fiction, hasn't published any of it since a short story appeared in The New Yorker in 1965. IN the past
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joan Caulfield
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1991
    Age 68
    Died on June 18, 1991.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1967
    Age 44
    In 1967 she starred in the western T.V. series The High Chaparral as Annalee Cannon on the pilot episode of the series.
    More Details Hide Details She was murdered in the series and that was the premise for the whole plot.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1960
    Age 37
    She and Ross were divorced in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details She later married Robert Peterson, a dentist, with whom she had her second son John Caulfield Peterson. Her second marriage ended in divorce as well. She died, aged 69, from cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and had lived in Beverly Hills, California. At the time of her death, she had one grandchild. She died within 24 hours of actress Jean Arthur, the first wife of her husband Frank Ross, Jr. Arthur had been married to Ross in 1932, and they divorced in 1949.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1950
    Age 27
    In 1950, she married the film producer Frank Ross, with whom she had a son Caulfield Kevin Ross.
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  • 1944
    Age 21
    However, Holden Caulfield was mentioned in Salinger's short story "Last Day of the Last Furlough" in the July 15, 1944 issue of the Saturday Evening Post, three years before Dear Ruth.
    More Details Hide Details The earliest known use of the Caulfield name, including a mention of Holden, is in the unpublished 1942 story "The Last and Best of the Peter Pans." A more common version of the legend claims that Salinger was taken by Joan Caulfield upon first seeing her in a modeling photo or a publicity still or an acting performance. Since Joan was a leading model by 1941 and her acting career began in 1942 with an appearance in the short-lived Broadway musical Beat the Band, this version of the legend makes his using her surname for his character at least possible.
  • 1943
    Age 20
    After being discovered by Broadway producers, she began a stage career in 1943 that eventually led to signing as an actress with Paramount Pictures.
    More Details Hide Details Born while her family resided in East Orange, New Jersey, she moved to West Orange during childhood but continued attending Miss Beard's School in Orange, New Jersey. During her teenage years, the family moved to New York City where Joan eventually attended Columbia University. One of her most memorable roles was when she was lent out to Warner Bros. to appear in The Unsuspected (1947) alongside Claude Rains and Audrey Totter. Later in life she appeared mostly on television, appearing on programs such as Cheyenne, Baretta, and Murder, She Wrote, with Angela Lansbury. In the 1957-1958 season, Caulfield starred in her own short-lived NBC situation comedy, Sally in the role of a traveling companion to an elderly widow, played by Marion Lorne. At midseason, Gale Gordon and Arte Johnson joined the cast. An urban legend states that Caulfield's film Dear Ruth (1947) inspired author J.D. Salinger to name the protagonist of his novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951) "Holden Caulfield" after seeing a movie theater marquee with the film's stars: Caulfield and William Holden.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Born
    Born on June 1, 1922.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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