Joan Fontaine
Actress
Joan Fontaine
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland, known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. Fontaine began her career on the stage in 1935 signed a contract with RKO Pictures that same year. In 1941, she earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress for her role in the Rebecca, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The following year, she won the Best Actress Academy Award for Hitchock's Suspicion (1941).
Biography
Joan Fontaine's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Joan Fontaine
News
News abour Joan Fontaine from around the web
Jane Eyre (1943) (retro trailer) - Flick Filosopher (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Nothing new, really, though: Look how this trailer promotes the 1943 Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's novel by basically saying, “You've read the book, haven't you? You haven't? For shame! Everyone else has read the book!
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Hollywood's chased romantic hero - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Exquisite bride Joan Fontaine wonders if he's trying to kill her. The revised ending makes her seem paranoid, but until then, Grant is charming and scary. Fontaine won the Best Actress Oscar, the only performer in a Hitchcock movie to get an Academy
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Crazy, Creepy Love: Romance is Dangerous in Rebecca, Jane Eyre - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Rebecca stars Joan Fontaine as the unnamed paid companion of an older woman, and Laurence Olivier as Max de Winter, the aristocratic widower who sweeps her away to married life at an estate called Manderley. Their arrival signals one of many tonal
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Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights: do we need new film versions? - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Then Joan Fontaine, cast as the meek governess, recites the book's first paragraphs, as if dictating a lesson in her schoolroom. But a film has to do more than merely illustrate a text. The medium's special power is the capacity to plunge us directly
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Film Review - Jane Eyre - CathNews
Google News - over 5 years
The best remembered is Hollywood's 1944 film, which succeeded almost solely because of its charismatic pairing of Orson Wells and Joan Fontaine as Rochester and Jane. Closer to contemporary sensibilities is Franco Zeffirelli's dour but atmospheric 1996
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Movie Review: Jane Eyre - The West Australian
Google News - over 5 years
Charlotte Bronte's classic romance has been filmed 18 times since the silent era, most famously in 1943 with Joan Fontaine as the plain-looking but obstinate governess Jane Eyre and Orson Welles as her tormented master, Edward Rochester
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Younger Siblings in the Spotlight - The Film Pilgrim
Google News - over 5 years
The list features the likes of Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland, Shirley MacLaine and Warren Beatty, Julia and Eric Roberts, Charlie Sheen and Emilio Estevez, Ralph and Joseph Fiennes, and the Baldwin brothers. It can be a tricky relationship,
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Eyre on the G string: film music for a heroine - Limelight Magazine
Google News - over 5 years
Jane Eyre's best cinematic outings come with a smouldering score to match the mood – just think of Bernard Herrmann's stormy orchestral music for the 1943 version starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine. Now Dario Marianelli, one of today's leading
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Robert Ryan's Quiet Furies
NYTimes - over 5 years
BORN to play beautifully tortured, angry souls, the actor Robert Ryan was a familiar movie face for more than two decades in Hollywood's classical years, his studio ups and downs, independent detours and outlier adventures paralleling the arc of American cinema as it went from a national pastime to near collapse. A little prettier and he might have
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NYTimes article
Cary Fukunaga's Bronte film adaptation is no plain Jane Eyre - The Australian
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Stevenson's wonderful 1943 black-and-white Jane Eyre (with Joan Fontaine as Jane and Orson Welles as Rochester), in discarding, like most subsequent adaptations, all but the ending from the novel's second half, was able to sustain the gothic
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The Weekly Wire: The Week's Recommended Events - Seattle Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
In the 1940 drama, Laurence Olivier plays the moody English aristocrat who falls for humble Joan Fontaine while vacationing in Monte Carlo. Their romance seems charmed—until they go home to his estate on the cliffs of Cornwall. Manderley!
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Home of Addams Family creator could be yours, Lurch not included - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
His Manhattan apartment may have included a beheading sword and an embalming block that served as a coffee table, but Addams was apparently also a charmer, dating Greta Garbo, Joan Fontaine, Olivia de Havilland and Jacqueline Kennedy, among others
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Dear Book Lover: Read the Book First, or Watch the Movie? - Wall Street Journal (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Once I saw the movie of "Jane Eyre" with Joan Fontaine, the image of Joan as Jane was stuck in my head. As much as I admired Miss Fontaine's performance, she looked nothing at all like my Jane Eyre. And while that film version of "Jane Eyre" was
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"This is not the best time in my life" - New Statesman (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
And certainly no link with the mousey heroine featured in Du Maurier's book and played to perfection in the film by Joan Fontaine. Absolutely, definitely and categorically no link between NewsCurs Rebekah and that little trouper Shirley Temple - thanks
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Spoiler Alert! Some Thoughts On Twist Endings - Movies I Didn't Get
Google News - over 5 years
Another interesting take on the “guilty after all” twist is ambiguously found in Alfred Hitchcock's Suspicion (1941), in which Lina (Joan Fontaine) spends most of the film convinced that her charming new husband, Johnnie (Cary Grant),
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Exclusive extract from 'My Dolce Vita: A Memoir' - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Celebrities poured in: Ingrid Bergman, Audrey Hepburn, Ava Gardner, Greta Garbo, Vivien Leigh, Joan Fontaine, Elizabeth Taylor, Greer Garson, Lana Turner and many more. Robert Taylor arrived with one wife, Barbara Stanwyck, had an affair with an
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Google News article
Actress Olivia de Havilland ("Gone With the Wind", "Robin Hood") Turns 95 - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Both she and her sister, Joan Fontaine (Rebecca, Suspicion, The Constant Nymph, Ivanhoe) were among the 1930s' leading motion picture actresses. De Havilland's film debut was 1935's A Midsummer Night's Dream. She is probably best known for her role in
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Google News article
Book to film bests and worsts - Lagniappe
Google News - over 5 years
I prefer the Orson Welles/ Joan Fontaine option from 1943 because she's just so angelic and he's Orson Welles. Still haven't seen the most recent one, but I'm willing to give it a chance. Nick Hornby also gets his own category since most of his popular
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Google News article
Seduction in concert - The Australian
Google News - over 5 years
Lisa (Joan Fontaine) falls for a concert pianist (Louis Jourdan), who heads off on a tour and promptly forgets about her. She marries another guy when she discovers she's pregnant with Stefan's child, then the rotter turns up and, still not knowing who
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Long-gone Top Hat was place to be - Pocono Record
Google News - over 5 years
Actress Joan Fontaine was also a guest of the Top Hat, PMW wrote. Some local folks spent time in the club's pool, which has since become the site of the Tilrose building, PMW wrote. "One late-night dip on a hot July evening by members of a Barrett
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joan Fontaine
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2013
    Age 95
    On December 15, 2013, Fontaine died in her sleep of natural causes at the age of 96 in her Carmel Highlands home.
    More Details Hide Details Her longtime friend Noel Beutel said, "She had been fading in recent days and died peacefully." Her Academy Award for best actress in Suspicion was initially going to be sold at an animal rights auction; however, the Academy threatened to sue since it was not offered back to them for $1. After Fontaine's death, deHavilland released a statement saying she was "shocked and saddened" by the news. Fontaine was cremated.
  • 1978
    Age 60
    Both sisters largely refused to comment publicly about their relationship. In a 1978 interview, however, Fontaine said of the sibling rivalry, "I married first, won the Oscar before Olivia did, and if I die first, she'll undoubtedly be livid because I beat her to it!" The following year, in a 1979 interview, Fontaine claimed the reason her sister and she stopped speaking to each other was that deHavilland wanted their mother (who was suffering from cancer) to be treated surgically at the advanced age of 88, which Fontaine apparently did not think was a good idea.
    More Details Hide Details Fontaine claims that after their mother died, deHavilland did not bother to try to find where Fontaine could be reached (Fontaine was on tour in a play). Instead, deHavilland sent a telegram, which did not arrive until two weeks later at Fontaine's next stop. According to Fontaine, deHavilland did not invite her to a memorial service for their mother. DeHavilland claims she informed Fontaine, but Fontaine brushed her off, claiming she was too busy to attend. Higham records that Fontaine had an estranged relationship with her own daughters, as well, possibly because she discovered that they were secretly maintaining a relationship with deHavilland.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1969
    Age 51
    Fontaine also went to visit deHavilland in Paris in 1969. The sisters reportedly did not completely stop speaking to each other until 1975, after their mother's funeral, to which Joan, who was out of the country, was not invited.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1964
    Age 46
    Fontaine's fourth and final marriage was to Sports Illustrated golf editor Alfred Wright, Jr, on January 23, 1964, in Elkton, Maryland; they divorced in 1969.
    More Details Hide Details While in South America for a film festival in 1951, Fontaine met a four-year-old Peruvian girl named Martita, and informally adopted her. Fontaine met Martita while visiting Incan ruins where Martita's father worked as a caretaker. Martita's parents allowed Fontaine to become Martita's legal guardian to give the child a better life. Fontaine promised Martita's parents she would send the girl back to Peru to visit when she was 16 years old. When Martita turned 16, Fontaine bought her a round-trip ticket to Peru, but Martita refused to go and opted to run away. Fontaine and Martita became estranged following the incident. While promoting her autobiography in 1978, Fontaine addressed the issue, stating, "Until my adopted daughter goes back to see her parents, she's not welcome. I promised her parents. I do not forgive somebody who makes me break my word."
  • 1960
    Age 42
    They separated in May 1960, and Fontaine filed for divorce in November 1960. Their divorce was finalized in January 1961.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1952
    Age 34
    Fontaine's third marriage was to producer and writer Collier Young on November 12, 1952.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1946
    Age 28
    In May 1946, she married actor/producer William Dozier in Mexico City. They had a daughter, Deborah Leslie, in 1948, and separated in 1949. Deborah is Fontaine's only biological child. The following year, Fontaine filed for divorce, charging Dozier with desertion. Their divorce was finalized in January 1951.
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  • 1943
    Age 25
    Fontaine held dual citizenship; she was British by birthright (both her parents were British) and became an American citizen in April 1943.
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  • 1942
    Age 24
    She left her hand and foot prints in front of the Grauman's Chinese Theatre on May 26, 1942.
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  • 1940
    Age 22
    Rebecca, starring Laurence Olivier alongside Fontaine, marked the American debut of British director Alfred Hitchcock. In 1940, the film was released to glowing reviews, and Fontaine was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.
    More Details Hide Details Fontaine did not win that year (Ginger Rogers took home the award for Kitty Foyle), but she did win the following year for Best Actress in Suspicion, which co-starred Cary Grant and was also directed by Hitchcock. This was the only Academy Award-winning acting performance to have been directed by Hitchcock. During the 1940s, Fontaine excelled in romantic melodramas. Among her memorable films during this time were The Constant Nymph (1943) (for which she received her third Academy Award nomination), Jane Eyre (1943), Ivy (1947) and Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948). Her film successes slowed a little during the 1950s, and she also began appearing in television and on the stage. She won good reviews for her role on Broadway in 1954 as Laura in Tea and Sympathy, opposite Anthony Perkins. She also appeared in numerous radio shows during the 1940s for the Lux Radio Theater.
  • 1939
    Age 21
    Fontaine was married and divorced four times. Her first marriage was to actor Brian Aherne, in 1939 in Del Monte, California; they divorced in April 1945.
    More Details Hide Details
    She continued appearing in small parts in about a dozen films, including The Women (1939), but failed to make a strong impression, and her contract was not renewed when it expired in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details Fontaine's luck changed one night at a dinner party when she found herself seated next to producer David O. Selznick. Selznick and she began discussing the Daphne du Maurier novel Rebecca, and Selznick asked her to audition for the part of the unnamed heroine. She endured a grueling six-month series of film tests, along with hundreds of other actresses, before securing the part sometime before her 22nd birthday.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1935
    Age 17
    There she attended the Tokyo School for Foreign Children, graduating in 1935.
    More Details Hide Details Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day (1935) and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (also 1935) in which she was credited as Joan Burfield. Although Fontaine, on contract with RKO, had already made her screen appearance in No More Ladies, a series of other minor roles followed, in A Million to One and Quality Street (both 1937), opposite Katharine Hepburn. The studio considered her a rising star, and touted The Man Who Found Himself (also 1937) as her first starring role, placing a special screen introduction, billed as the "new RKO screen personality" after the end credit. She next appeared in a major role alongside Fred Astaire in his first RKO film without Ginger Rogers: A Damsel in Distress (1937), but audiences were disappointed and the film flopped.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1919
    Age 1
    De Havilland's parents married in 1914 and separated in 1919, when Lilian decided to end the marriage after discovering that her husband used the sexual services of geishas; the divorce was not finalized, however, until February 1925.
    More Details Hide Details Taking a physician's advice, Lilian deHavilland moved Joanreportedly a sickly child who had developed anaemia following a combined attack of the measles and a streptococcal infectionand her elder sister, Olivia de Havilland, to the United States. The family settled in Saratoga, California, and Fontaine's health improved dramatically. She was educated at nearby Los Gatos High School, and was soon taking diction lessons alongside her elder sister. When she was 16 years old, deHavilland returned to Japan to live with her father.
  • 1917
    Born
    Born on October 22, 1917.
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