Joe Gallo
American mobster of Italian descent
Joe Gallo
Joseph Gallo, also known as "Crazy Joe" and "Joe the Blond", was a celebrated New York City gangster for the Profaci crime family, later known as the Colombo crime family. Gallo initiated one of the bloodiest mob conflicts since the 1931 Castellammarese War and was murdered as a result of it.
Biography
Joe Gallo's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Joe Gallo
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Joe Gallo
News
News abour Joe Gallo from around the web
Man jailed over robbery of cab driver - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Champaign police Lt. Joe Gallo said Starns is considered a suspect in a couple of other Champaign cab robberies that have occurred since Aug. 5. There was also one in Urbana but an arrest was made in that. In the Aug. 19 holdup, Champaign police
Article Link:
Google News article
New York: meurtres, restaurants et épiceries - Cyberpresse
Google News - over 5 years
On se rappelle aussi le meurtre du gangster Joe Gallo, commis en plein Umberto's Clam House en 1972 et qui a transformé le restaurant, bien malgré lui, en curiosité touristique. L'établissement n'est plus au même endroit. Il a déménagé un petit peu
Article Link:
Google News article
Gallo's Homer Highlights All-Star Game - Baseball America
Google News - over 5 years
West first baseman Joe Gallo showed prodigious power himself, earning MVP on the strength of the 442-foot home run he hit into the center field bleachers. The solo homer came on a 93 mph fastball from East righthander Lucas Sims in the second inning
Article Link:
Google News article
Carwash to help fire family - Nevada Appeal
Google News - over 5 years
Not pictured is Joe Gallo. The team is hosting a car wash fundraiser to help one of there members Hayden Hudson and family members Molly and Liz Hudson an Eleanor Muscott who lost there home to a fire on July 24. A fundraiser is set for Saturday to
Article Link:
Google News article
Crazy Joe and Mr. Untouchable — the Unlikely Gangster Alliance - New Criminologist
Google News - over 5 years
The conclusion of the psychiatrists who examined him was unanimous: “Joe Gallo is insane.” The nickname “Crazy” Joe stuck. Bob Dylan would later compose a song about the growing legend of Crazy Joe Gallo. Gallo had been convicted on conspiracy and
Article Link:
Google News article
Champaign police investigating fatal shooting - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Lt. Joe Gallo said officers responded to a shooting at the intersection of Bradley and McKinley avenues at 2:42 am and found a man mortally wounded. "He was pretty much in the middle of the intersection and he was alive," said Gallo
Article Link:
Google News article
Breslin: Old con man finally gets just deserts - New York Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
While there, he worked in the offices, and an inmate from Brooklyn, Joe Gallo, sauntered in and put his feet up on the desk. A big guard came in and brushed his feet off and threatened him. Joe said to him, "I know one thing about you
Article Link:
Google News article
Jimi Hendrix-Pat O'Day monument unveiled at gala event with Seattle rock royalty - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Also displayed were some unusual limited edition images by Joe Gallo. Images of Hendrix playing live in 1968 were depicted with swirling images of a star-filled galaxy in the background that were actually photographed by the Hubble Telescope
Article Link:
Google News article
Former NFL Star Visits Pennsbury School - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Pennsbury social worker Tammy Kehan-Leimer and Edgewood Elementary physical education teacher Joe Gallo put their heads together to create a new and improved version of recess that both inspires and engages students with varying social and athletic
Article Link:
Google News article
Troy Vincent fuels up at Edgewood Elementary School - Bucks Local News
Google News - almost 6 years
“It teaches them to play games on their own – to be self-sufficient and learn how to manage games without referees and umpires,” said Edgewood PE teacher Joe Gallo. “It teaches them a lot of things that we did all the time when we were younger,
Article Link:
Google News article
Leading Word on the Shore area finishers of the Michael Thorne 4 Miler (402 total) - Word on the Shore
Google News - almost 6 years
West Long Branch: Nicholas Martinelli 26:45 (26 minutes and 45 seconds racing time), Joe Gallo 28:09, Robert Quackenbush 28:10, Sharon Carlstrom 29:14, John Dennehy 29:18, Conor O'Brien 29:22, Mel Ullmeyer 29:37, Ed Kelly 29:53, Kimberly Sheckler 30:42
Article Link:
Google News article
Festejó Al Pacino 71 años viendo “Wilde Salome” - Filmeweb
Google News - almost 6 years
... recientemente que volverán a trabajar juntos en un filme dirigido por Martin Scorsese y cuya historia se basará en un libro titulado “I heard you paint houses”, acerca de un hombre que asesinó a dos conocidos mafiosos: Jimmy Hoffa y Joe Gallo
Article Link:
Google News article
Al Pacino en la cumbre de su carrera - laverdad.com
Google News - almost 6 years
El guión habla de Frank el "Irlandés", un mafioso que confiesa haber matado a dos hombres de la mafia, Jimmy Hoffa y Joe Gallo, la historia se desarrolla en Nueva York. Además de esto, Pacino trabajará en la película que está rodando el director
Article Link:
Google News article
Al Pacino llega por tercera vez a la pantalla grande como director - Informador.com.mx
Google News - almost 6 years
... recientemente que volverán a trabajar juntos en un filme dirigido por Martin Scorsese y cuya historia se basará en un libro titulado 'I heard you paint houses', acerca de un hombre que asesinó a dos conocidos mafiosos: Jimmy Hoffa y Joe Gallo
Article Link:
Google News article
READING NEW YORK; Tours,Tycoons and Crazy Joe
NYTimes - almost 8 years
IN September, New Yorkers will celebrate the quadricentennial of Henry Hudson's voyage, and if you ever wondered what Hudson encountered when he arrived, you can turn for answers to Eric W. Sanderson, who reimagines 1609 Manhattan in stunning and exuberant detail. Mr. Sanderson, a senior ecologist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, has
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Spare Times
NYTimes - almost 8 years
TOFU TAKEDOWN In the spirit of two wholly American pursuits -- overeating and winning -- comes the Takedown, a cooking competition where anything goes. Held in bars around town, it pits a few dozen mostly amateur contestants against one another in battles centered on dishes like chili (above), salsa or cookies. There are judges, audience favorites
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Last of the Summer Wine
NYTimes - about 8 years
THREE BALCONIES By Bruce Jay Friedman 203 pp. Biblioasis. $24.95 A friend of mine had an uncle who, years after surviving a concentration camp, would respond to every petty inconvenience and irritation by exclaiming, ''First the Holocaust. Now this!'' That expectation of suffering, greeted with more shrug than outrage, is at the heart of much
Article Link:
NYTimes article
A RECORD SNOWFALL: BROOKLYN; In One Neighborhood, Self-Sufficient Residents Help Themselves and One Another
NYTimes - about 11 years
Alex Walborn, a Brooklyn mailman, had one foot in the slush and the other in the snow. ''People just don't shovel the corners,'' he grumbled, lifting a fully loaded letter carrier's cart as he waded gingerly through a crosswalk on Prospect Park West, the main shopping artery of Windsor Terrace. ''The corners are the worst of it,'' Mr. Walborn said.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
FOLLOWING UP
NYTimes - about 12 years
Still Serving Italian, Long After a Mob Hit A lot of clam sauce has passed over the tabletops in 33 years, but time has not erased the identification of Umberto's Clam House in Manhattan with one of the more sensational Mafia murders in New York City in recent history. That was the shooting of the mobster Joseph Gallo in April 1972 at the
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joe Gallo
    FORTIES
  • 1972
    Age 42
    On April 7, 1972, Colombo family gunmen murdered Joe Gallo in a Manhattan restaurant.
    More Details Hide Details At 4:30 a.m. that day Gallo and his family entered Umberto's Clam House in Little Italy, Manhattan. He was there to celebrate his 43rd birthday with sister Carmella, wife Sina Essary, her daughter Lisa, his bodyguard Peter "Pete the Greek" Diapoulas and Diapoulas' female companion. Earlier that evening the Gallo party visited the Copacabana Club in Manhattan with Jerry and Marta Orbach to see a performance by comedian Don Rickles. Once at Umberto's, the Gallo party took two tables, with Gallo and Diapoulas facing the wall. Unknown to Gallo, Colombo associate Joseph Luparelli was sitting at the bar. When he saw Gallo, he immediately left Umberto's and walked two blocks to another restaurant that was a Colombo hangout. After contacting Yacovelli, Luparelli recruited Colombo associates Philip Gambino, Carmine DiBiase and two other men, reputedly members of the Patriarca family, to kill Gallo. On reaching Umberto's, Luparelli stayed in the car and the other four men went inside through the back door.
  • 1971
    Age 41
    Gallo soon became a part of New York high society. His connection started when actor Jerry Orbach played the inept mobster "Kid Sally Palumbo" in the 1971 film The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight, a role loosely based on Gallo.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1971 Gallo was released from prison.
    More Details Hide Details His second wife Sina described Gallo shortly after his release, saying he appeared "... extremely frail and pale. He looked like an old man. He was a bag of bones. You could see the remnants of what had been a strikingly handsome man in his youth. He had beautiful features--beautiful nose, beautiful mouth and piercing blue eyes."
    Later in 1971 Jeffie divorced Gallo again.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had one daughter, Joie Gallo.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1968
    Age 38
    In May 1968, while Joe Gallo was still in prison, Larry Gallo died of cancer.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1964
    Age 34
    On August 29, 1964, Gallo sued the Department of Corrections, stating that guards inflicted cruel and unusual punishment on him at Green Haven after he allowed an African-American barber to cut his hair.
    More Details Hide Details The Commissioner characterized Gallo as a belligerent prisoner and an agitator. While at Auburn Gallo took up watercolor painting. He became an avid reader and was soon conversant on Jean-Paul Sartre, Franz Kafka, Albert Camus, Alexandre Dumas, Victor Hugo, Leo Tolstoy, Ayn Rand and his role model Niccolò Machiavelli. He also read The New York Times. Gallo worked as an elevator operator in the prison's woodworking shop. During a riot at Auburn he rescued a severely wounded corrections officer from angry inmates. The officer later testified for Gallo at a parole hearing. According to Donald Frankos, a fellow inmate at Auburn, Gallo's philosophy was to be the best you can be, whether it was a car driver or gangster; never settle for second best. Gallo tutored Frankos on Machiavelli and Frankos taught Gallo how to play bridge. Frankos later described Gallo;
  • 1963
    Age 33
    Later in 1963 the Mafia Commission forced Magliocco to resign and installed Joseph Colombo, an ally of Gambino crime family boss Carlo Gambino, as the new Profaci family boss.
    More Details Hide Details The Profaci family now became the Colombo crime family. However, Colombo soon alienated Gambino with his establishment of the Italian-American Civil Rights League. Gambino did not appreciate all the publicity that Colombo was generating. It is possible that Gambino encouraged Gallo to continue his challenge to the Colombo leadership. Immediately after Gallo's release from prison, Colombo and Joseph Yacovelli invited him to meet with them and receive a homecoming gift of $1,000. Gallo reportedly told the family representatives that he wasn't bound by the 1963 peace agreement and demanded $100,000 to settle the dispute. When the leadership heard Gallo's answer, they issued an order to kill him. However, another gunman struck first. On June 28, 1971, at the second League rally in Columbus Circle in Manhattan, Colombo was shot in the head by Jerome A. Johnson, a black gunman posing as a photographer. Colombo's bodyguards immediately shot and killed Johnson. Colombo survived the shooting, but went into a coma from which he never recovered. After completing their investigation (which included an interview with Joe Gallo) the police concluded that Johnson was a lone shooter who had no ties with any criminal organization.
  • 1962
    Age 32
    In 1962, while Joey was serving time at Attica prison, his brothers Larry and Al "Kid Blast", along with five other member of the Gallo gang including Frank "Punchy" Illiano, rushed into a burning Brooklyn tenement building near their hangout, the Longshore Rest Room, and saved six children and their mother from the fire.
    More Details Hide Details The gang was briefly celebrated in the press. While at Green Haven Gallo became friends with African-American drug trafficker Nicky Barnes. Gallo predicted a power shift in the Harlem drug rackets from the Cosa Nostra to black gangs, and he coached Barnes on how to upgrade his criminal organization. Gallo was soon recruiting African-Americans as soldiers in the Gallo crew. Gallo's relationships with other Cosa Nostra inmates was distant; they reportedly called him "The Criminal" for fraternizing with Barnes and other black inmates.
  • 1961
    Age 31
    On December 21, 1961, he was sentenced to seven to 14 years in state prison.
    More Details Hide Details While serving his sentence, Gallo was incarcerated at three New York State prisons: Green Haven Correctional Facility in Beekman, New York, Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York, and Auburn Correctional Facility in Auburn, New York.
    In November 1961 Joe Gallo was convicted on conspiracy and extortion for attempting to extort money from the businessman.
    More Details Hide Details
    On August 20, 1961, Larry Gallo was lured to a meeting at the Sahara Lounge, a Brooklyn supper club.
    More Details Hide Details Once inside the club Profaci hitmen, including Persico, tried to strangle Larry Gallo. However, a passing police officer thwarted the execution. With the start of the gang war, the Gallo gang retreated to their headquarters on President Street, dubbed "The Dormitory". Joey's father served as cook for the gang. Larry Gallo forced crew members to pick up their cigarette butts and do chores on a regular basis. A virtual arsenal, the Dormitory was safe from attack. However, the New York Police Department (NYPD) raided the place many times. As the year progressed, the Gallo brothers were unable to tend to their usual rackets and started running out of money. Joe tried to extort payments from a cafe owner, who immediately went to the police.
    However, Profaci was busy planning his revenge. He bribed Carmine Persico to secretly work for him and planned his next strike. In May 1961 Profaci gunmen killed Joseph "Joe Jelly" Gioelli, Gallo's top enforcer.
    More Details Hide Details They dumped Gioelli's clothing stuffed with dead fish in front of a diner frequented by the Gallo gang.
    In early 1961 the Gallo crew attempted to kidnap the entire Profaci leadership.
    More Details Hide Details Profaci escaped capture, but the crew was able to get his brother-in-law and underboss Joseph Magliocco, along with four Profaci capos. The Gallos demanded a more favorable financial scheme for the hostages' release. Joe Gallo wanted to kill one hostage and demand $100,000 before negotiations, but Larry Gallo overruled him. After a few weeks of negotiation, Profaci made a deal with the Gallos.
  • 1960
    Age 30
    Joe Gallo's brothers Larry Gallo and Albert "Kid Blast" Gallo were also his criminal associates. His sister was Carmello Fiorello. Gallo's first wife, whom he married around 1960, divorced in the mid-1960s, and then in July 1971 remarried, was Las Vegas showgirl Jeffie Lee Boyd.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1958
    Age 28
    In 1958 Gallo and his brothers were summoned to Washington, D.C., to testify before the McClellan Committee of the U.S. Senate on organized crime.
    More Details Hide Details When visiting Senate Counsel Robert F. Kennedy in his office, Gallo flirted with Kennedy's secretary and told Kennedy his carpet would be excellent for a dice game. On the witness stand, none of the brothers provided any useful information.
  • 1957
    Age 27
    In 1957 Profaci allegedly asked Gallo and his crew to murder Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Anastasia crime family.
    More Details Hide Details Anastasia's underboss Carlo Gambino wanted to replace Anastasia and asked Profaci for assistance. As a former head of Murder, Inc. Anastasia was a dangerous hitman who could not be easily killed. On October 25, 1957, Anastasia entered the barber shop of the Park Sheraton Hotel (now the Park Central Hotel) in midtown Manhattan. Anastasia's bodyguards parked the car in an underground garage and then left the building. As Anastasia relaxed in the barber chair, two men--scarves covering their faces--rushed in, shoved the barber out of the way and fired at Anastasia. After the first volley of bullets, Anastasia allegedly lunged at his killers. However, the stunned Anastasia had actually attacked the gunmen's reflections in the wall mirror. They continued firing and Anastasia finally fell to the floor, dead. To this day Anastasia's killers have not been conclusively identified. One theory is that the gunmen actually came from the Patriarca crime family of Providence, Rhode Island. However, Carmine Persico later said that he and Joe Gallo had shot Anastasia, joking that he was part of Gallo's "barbershop quintet".
  • 1950
    Age 20
    In 1950, after an arrest, Gallo was temporarily placed in Kings County Hospital Center in Brooklyn, where he was diagnosed with schizophrenia.
    More Details Hide Details Albert Seedman, the head of New York's detective bureau, called Gallo "that little guy with steel balls".
  • TEENAGE
  • 1949
    Age 19
    In 1949, after viewing the film Kiss of Death, Joe Gallo began mimicking Richard Widmark's gangster character "Tommy Udo" and reciting movie dialogue.
    More Details Hide Details Gallo was nicknamed "Joey the Blond" because of his full chest of blond hair.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1929
    Born
    Born on April 7, 1929.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)