John Drew Barrymore
American actor
John Drew Barrymore
John Drew Barrymore was a member of the Barrymore family of actors, which included his father, John Barrymore, and his father's siblings, Lionel and Ethel. He was the father of four children, including John Blyth Barrymore and Drew Barrymore.
Biography
John Drew Barrymore's personal information overview.
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News
News abour John Drew Barrymore from around the web
Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936
Huffington Post - 22 days
On the KCRW show “Scheer Intelligence,” Edward Sorel, author and illustrator of book and magazine covers, tells Robert Scheer about the enduring interest that led to his new book, “Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936.” The book details the life of the late actress Mary Astor and her scandalous extramarital affairs with prominent men of the time, including Broadway producer George S. Kaufman and actor John Barrymore. Sorel and Scheer also discuss the impact Astor’s very public love affairs had on her movie career and the parallels between the movie business of the early 20th century and the industry of today. —Adapted from Truthdig.com -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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Huffington Post article
Pigskin Bomb, Prohibition and a Wacky Restaurant Score Historic 'Firsts' for Mazatlan
Huffington Post - 5 months
Photo shows sites of two of Mazatlan's "firsts": Neveria Hill (rear of picture) and the historic Hotel Belmar, opened in 1920 on Olas Altas. Besides the dubious distinction of being the first city on this side of the world to be bombed from the air, Mexico's Pacific port at Mazatlan was home to the country's first beach resort - at a time when today's playlands at Acapulco, Cancun, the Riviera Maya, Los Cabos, Ixtapa and the like were mostly just barren stretches of sand. Think of the pressure that must have been on Mexican rebel pilot Gustavo Salinas. It's 1914, during the Mexican revolution, and he's about to make history by bombing a federale fort from his rickety biplane. What's more, the 21-year-old pilot is being closely watched by the guy who ordered the raid, General Venustiano Carranza, commander of the Northern Revolutionary Constitutionalist Army (Carranza is also Salinas' uncle). When he had flown the plane to the right place (he thought) over the fort, Salinas tol ...
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Huffington Post article
Alaska tribe to get back totem pole taken by U.S actor in 1930s
Yahoo News - over 1 year
A totem pole taken by the Hollywood actor John Barrymore from an Alaska tribe 84 years ago is being returned to the village after decorating the yards of California mansions for years and being stored in the basement of a museum in Hawaii. The 30-foot-tall carved wooden obelisk belonging to the Tlingit tribe is due to reach Alaska on Nov. 6 from Honolulu, capping a journey that began in 1931 when Barrymore took it during a sailing trip along the coast. "Barrymore must have strapped the pole to his 120-foot yacht and sailed away, continuing on his voyage northward," said University of Alaska professor emeritus Steve Langdon, who has spent years tracking down the pole.
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Yahoo News article
A 1920s classic in Beverly Hills
LATimes - over 1 year
A tree-trunk floor in the den, a fireplace in the entry and a one-time opium room over the master bedroom are among features at Bella Vista, which was built for early filmmaker King Vidor. The director-producer-screenwriter sold the 1920s home to actor John Barrymore, who bridged the silent and...
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LATimes article
A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in Movies, Part II
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933's Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. Enjoy, and please refrain from suing us if you feel otherwise... 1. Devil's Advocate (1997) Keanu Reeves plays Kevin Lomax, a hot-shot young Florida lawyer who is all about climbing the ladder. When he gets an offer he can't refuse from a high-powered New York firm, led by the legendary John Milton (Al Pacino). Soon Kevin's wife (Charlize Theron) is plagued by demonic visions and he realizes he's literally so ...
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Huffington Post article
Helgi Tomasson on His 'Romeo and Juliet' - An Anniversary at San Francisco Ballet
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
San Francisco Ballet finishes its programs at the War Memorial Opera House with eleven performances of Helgi Tomasson's Romeo and Juliet beginning Friday, May 1 and concluding Sunday, May 10. The entire season has been a glamorous and artistic triumph for the Company and a stunning tribute for the 30th Anniversary of Helgi Tomasson as Artistic Director. Last seen in 2012, Romeo and Juliet is luxuriant and passionate, the look is Renaissance Chic. Set on the 1935 score by Sergei Prokofiev, Tomasson's choreography illumines the composer's bold and descriptive approach to the music and fleshes out the anguish and rapture of Shakespeare's most beloved cast of characters. "Did my heart love till now!" exclaims Romeo, "forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw beauty till this night." [Act I, scene v] Joan Boada and Maria Kochetkova. SF Ballet. Photo, Erik Tomasson Though its position on the charts may shift from hour to hour, Romeo and Juliet generally heads the line of Shakespeare's m ...
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Huffington Post article
A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in Movies
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933's Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) Gregory Peck's Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee's award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, causing the already-divided town's racial tensions to boil over. Through it all, ...
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Huffington Post article
Drew Barrymore Won't Let Daughter Pose for Playboy: "That's My Journey"
US Magazine - about 3 years
Drew Barrymore has no regrets over her very wild younger years, but that doesn't mean she wants her daughter to follow in her footsteps. In an interview with ABC News' Amy Robach, the 38-year-old actress, who is six-months-pregnant with her second daughter, opens up about how motherhood has changed her. "Is there anything you look back at [in your life] and you kind of cringe?" Robach asked. "No. I celebrate that I had any sense of freedoms at a certain point, because I don't feel like that now," Barrymore said. "I love the very exposed, humorous, imperfect, never trying to pretend to be perfect journey that I have been on in my life." PHOTOS: Drew Barrymore's wild style The E.T. child star famously went to rehab at the age of 13 for alcohol and drug abuse. She later attempted suicide, and became emancipated from her parents at age 15. By 19, she posed for Playboy and got her first divorce from Jeremy Thomas. (Barrymore remains estranged from mother Jaid Barrymore; father J ...
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US Magazine article
Most Narrow House In New York Barely Wide Enough For A Bed, Bought For $3.25 Million (VIDEO, PHOTOS)
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Space is definitely at a premium in New York City, but some homebuyers have other things on their wish lists ahead of square footage. Like George Gund IV, who recently dropped $3.25 million on a space less than one thousand square feet that is only 9 ½ feet wide. The city's Landmarks Preservation Commission says that 75½ Bedford Street in Greenwich Village is New York's narrowest townhouse, according to The Wall Street Journal. Originally listed for $4.3 million, Gund was happy to pay the price to live in this home because of its surprising history. Poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, Margaret Mead and John Barrymore were just a few of the well-known people who have slept within the (close) quarters. Watch the video above to learn more about its history and click through the slideshow below to see more. Have something to say? Check out HuffPost Home on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram.
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99-year-old doesn't believe in 'can't'
Blue Ridge Now - over 3 years
“There is no such word as ‘can’t,’ ” Elsa Moegle Jennings says. “It’s all in your mind. If you want to do something badly enough, you can.” Jennings should know. She’s been doing one amazing thing after another for a long time. On Dec. 29, she will turn 100 years young. Jennings, who is a summer resident of Hendersonville, has been a lifelong trailblazer and remains active today. She was one of the first women students accepted to The Juilliard School (then called Institute of Musical Art) and in 1936 was the first woman harpist to graduate from Juilliard. An only child, Jennings was born in Jersey City, N.J., to two musicians — her father was a violinist and her mother a pianist. Her father died when Jennings was only a year old, and he had a dream that his daughter would become a harpist. “My mother bought me my first harp when I was 9 years old,” Jennings recalls. Later, she received a grand harp, “the big one,” and it took both her mother and her to move it. “It’s much eas ...
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Blue Ridge Now article
Dr. Franklin Ruehl, Ph.D.: Frightway to Stardom (Part 1)
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Alan Alda battling a satanic pianist! James Arness combating titanic ants! Gene Barry fighting Martian invaders! These are just a few of the fascinating roles many of Tinseltown's top stars once essayed early in their careers in the horror/sci-fi genre! Intriguingly, a surprisingly high percentage of Hollywood luminaries started out in such entries. These early appearances in horror and sci-fi films and television programs, although often low-budget in nature, afforded them an excellent opportunity to perfect their craft and display their talent, setting the stage for later success. Indeed, it can truly be said that this early experience represented a "Frightway to Stardom." The following are among the many celebs who started out in the niche of horror and sci-fi: -Alan Alda: The only actor to appear in every single episode of TV's M.A.S.H. (1972-82) portrayed a young journalist involved with a dying satanic pianist (Curt Jurgens, seen as Sebastian, a magician d ...
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Huffington Post article
Narrowest house in New York once owned by Cary Grant finally finds buyer to squeeze into 9.5-foot-wide walls
Daily Mail (UK) - almost 4 years
The townhouse is legendary for both its 9.5-foot-wide size and its famous past inhabitants, which include Cary Grant, John Barrymore, Edna St Vincent Millay and Margaret Mead.
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Daily Mail (UK) article
Barrymore - Blu-ray Review
Monsters and Critics - almost 4 years
Christopher Plummer’s tour-de-force as boozy John Barrymore is committed to film for future generations and they’re the better for it.
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Monsters and Critics article
Mark C. Miller: Want to Hear a Good Story?
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Lauri Fraser, creator and co-host of I Love a Good Story Photo: Lauri Fraser Courtesy of: Lauri Fraser Surrender, Los Angeles! The storytelling/spoken word movement has invaded and taken over the city, much as stand-up comedy clubs proliferated during the eighties and nineties. Dozens of clubs, theaters, and coffee houses on any given night now feature actors, comedians, writers, and civilians from all age ranges, ethnicities and walks of life entertaining live audiences with true, funny, heartfelt stories about their lives. And despite the plethora of entertainment choices, audiences can't seem to get enough of these live storytelling events. Perhaps it's a reaction against all the technology and a desire to get back to our basic telling stories around the campfire or our parents reading us a bedtime story. Don't show up in your pajamas, though. You'll no doubt be singled out. One of the best of these shows, I Love a Good Story, is both a live show and, after it ...
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Huffington Post article
Dr. Franklin Ruehl, Ph.D.: Two More Starlets Who Met Tragic Demises!
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Noted TV actress Inger Stevens and silent screen star Martha Mansfield are two female thespians who suffered tragic, premature deaths! Inger Stevens (1934-1970): This Swedish blue-eyed blonde captivator (born Inger Stensland in Stockholm) starred in the doomsday epic, The World, The Flesh, And The Devil(1959), as Sarah Crandall, the survivor of a nuclear holocaust. A white racist (Mel Ferrer, who was a pianist with new hands in 1967's The Hands of Orlac) and a miner (Harry Belafonte, who was a Jewish angel named Alex Levine in 1970 The Angel Levine) joined her as the only other surviving humans on the planet. This dark, apocalyptic work had a surprise ending: after it appeared certain that one of the men would kill the other as they hunted each other through Manhattan's deserted canyons, the trio wound up skipping off hand-in-hand, determined to make the best of what fate had offered them. Of course, Inger is best remembered for two superb 1960 episodes of The Twilight Z ...
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Huffington Post article
Anne Margaret Daniel: What Did F. Scott Fitzgerald Think of The Great Gatsby, the Movie, in 1926? He Walked Out
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
What did F. Scott Fitzgerald think of the first movie of version of The Great Gatsby? Not much. He didn't stay in the theater to see the end of the only version of the novel made during his lifetime. Hollywood, January 1927: Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald were in Los Angeles for the first time. He was excited to be setting to work on an original screenplay for Lipstick, a collegiate fantasy for the actress Constance Talmadge. As soon as there were movies and stars to admire, Fitzgerald's longtime love of the stage had translated quickly to screen -- and, after his last attempt at a play, The Vegetable, had failed so miserably in 1923, perhaps a screenplay would be just the modern thing to redeem his beloved writing of dialogue. Zelda came with him, but they paused on the way to drop their daughter Scottie, who had turned 6 that past autumn, with Zelda's parents in Montgomery, Ala. Scott figured his screenplay would take only a few weeks to write, but he and Zelda staye ...
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Huffington Post article
Jamal Hammadi: Joshua Tree: A Fresh Adventure Every Time (PHOTOS)
Huffington Post - over 4 years
I first went to Joshua Tree about 15 years ago. I stayed at a friend's place where we slept on the roof of the house, watching the stars and the beautiful night sky, listening to the howling wolves. I was amazed. The next day, we wandered around for hours, ending up in Joshua Tree National Park. I had never seen anything like it! It was like we were on another planet! It was so odd and magical. The rock formations were stunning, how they would sit on top of one another in the most precarious positions. I felt as if I blew even a small breath at them they could tumble over. We would climb over rocks for hours and listen to our echoes. Or we would sit there in yoga poses and imagine what the American Indians had done in the same place, like what berries they had eaten or where they would have walked. I remember feeling so grateful to President Roosevelt for the National Park system. It was such a definitive moment in time, one in which my passion for nature's wonder was so inten ...
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Huffington Post article
Mitch Ditkoff: 50 Awesome Quotes on Risk Taking
Huffington Post - over 4 years
1. "Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it." -- Goethe 2. "Security is mostly a superstition. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." -- Helen Keller 3. "It's not because things are difficult that we dare not venture. It's because we dare not venture that they are difficult." -- Seneca 4. "Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far it is possible to go." -- T.S. Eliot 5. "What you have to do and the way you have to do it is incredibly simple. Whether you are willing to do it is another matter." -- Peter Drucker 6. "Go out on a limb. That's where the fruit is." -- Jimmy Carter 7. "I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it." -- Pablo Picasso 8. "Life is being on the wire, everything else is just waiting. -- Karl Wallenda 9. "If things seem under control, you are just not going fast enough." -- Mario Andretti 10. "Don't be afraid ...
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Huffington Post article
Mitch Ditkoff: 100 Awesome Quotes on What It Really Takes to Innovate
Huffington Post - over 4 years
1. "I want to put a ding in the universe." - Steve Jobs 2. "Ideas won't keep. Something must be done about them." - Alfred North Whitehead 3. "Intuition will tell the thinking mind where to look next." - Jonas Salk 4. "If you have always done it that way, it is probably wrong." - Charles Kettering 5. "If you can dream it, you can do it." - Walt Disney 6. "Security is mostly a superstition. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." - Helen Keller 7. "You can't solve a problem on the same level that it was created. You have to rise above it to the next level." - Albert Einstein 8. "Do not fear mistakes. There are none." - Miles Davis 9. "The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect, but by the play instinct arising from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the object it loves." - Carl Jung 10. "There is only one thing stronger than all the armies of the world: and that is an idea whose time has come." - Victor Hugo ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John Drew Barrymore
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2004
    Age 71
    Died on November 29, 2004.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2003
    Age 70
    In 2003, daughter Drew Barrymore moved him near her home despite their estrangement, paying his medical bills until his death from cancer.
    More Details Hide Details He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contributions to television.
  • FORTIES
  • 1976
    Age 43
    His TV and film career ended permanently by 1976, although even before this point he became more and more reclusive.
    More Details Hide Details Suffering from the same problems with addiction that had destroyed his father, Barrymore became a derelict. Estranged from his family, including his children, his lifestyle continued to worsen and his physical and mental health deteriorated.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1967
    Age 34
    After the SAG suspension handed to him in 1967 was served, Barrymore only worked on-screen sporadically, sometimes with a few years between appearances.
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  • 1966
    Age 33
    He did appear as Stacey Daggart in the 1966–67 NBC series The Road West, starring Barry Sullivan.
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    In 1966, Barrymore was signed to play a guest role as Lazarus in the Star Trek episode "The Alternative Factor".
    More Details Hide Details However, he failed to show up (and was ultimately replaced at the last minute by actor Robert Brown), resulting in a SAG suspension of six months.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1958
    Age 25
    In 1958, he changed his middle name to Drew, although he had previously been credited in past works as Blyth, and appeared in many low budget films such as High School Confidential, Never Love a Stranger (1958), Night of the Quarter Moon (1959), and The Keeler Affair (1963) as Stephen Ward.
    More Details Hide Details This was followed by a brief resurgence in Italian movies as he appeared in several leading roles. He also appeared several times in the TV series Gunsmoke. However, Barrymore's social behavior obstructed any professional progress. In the 1960s, he was occasionally incarcerated for drug use, public drunkenness, and spousal abuse. He guest-starred in other memorable episodes of classic TV Westerns Rawhide — "Incident of The Haunted Hills" — playing a half-Native, half-White outcast and Wagon Train — "The Ruttledge Munroe Story" — playing a "too cheerful" character who spreads death wherever he goes and turns out to be a figure from Major Adams's (Ward Bond) military past.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1952
    Age 19
    All four of Barrymore's marriages ended in divorce. He married actress Cara Williams in 1952; they divorced in 1959.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1932
    Born
    Born on June 4, 1932.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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