John Carradine
Actor
John Carradine
John Carradine was an American actor, best known for his roles in horror films and Westerns as well as Shakespearean theater. A member of Cecil B. DeMille's stock company and later John Ford's company, he was one of the most prolific character actors in Hollywood history.
Biography
John Carradine's personal information overview.
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News
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di RUGGERO GUARINI Uno dei primi film americani che vidi da bambino, ormai più ... - Il Tempo
Google News - over 5 years
(Raymond Massey, Thomas Mitchell, Mary Astor, John Carradine, John Hall e una meravigliosa Dorothy Lamour), il film descriveva con grande efficacia gli effetti di un furioso tornado in un'isola del Pacifico. Ma quella tempesta non aveva semplicemente
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Art Hansl Books Now in E-Format: Collection of Popular Thrillers and Biography ... - NewsReleaseWire.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Horrorwitz: In 1975 you made another movie with director Juan López Moctezuma, Mary, Mary, Bloody Mary, where you got to work with the legendary John Carradine of whom you said some nice things about in your book. Have there been any other actors
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MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000: THE UNEARTHLY AND RED ZONE CUBA (DVD) - Film Threat
Google News - over 5 years
“The Unearthly” is a 1957 black-and-white horror film starring John Carradine and Tor Johnson. The story has something to do with a mad scientist whose experiments accidentally produce mutants, but instead of giving us lots of “Night of the Living
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The Wonderful Words of Weaver: Part Two - FANGORIA
Google News - over 5 years
... sugar I use to help the medicine of writing about '70s and '80s movies go down is that I mostly stick to interviewing '70s and '80s people who worked on horror flicks alongside “my” old-timers—William Castle, Vincent Price, John Carradine, whoever
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Huron County Playhouse beginnings by James Murphy; an inspiring read - Lakeshore Advance
Google News - over 5 years
As time went on Hollywood and New York actors including John Carradine, Don Porter, Tim Henry, Gloria Gifford all graced the Huron Country Playhouse stage. Murphy left at the end of the 1979 season and was succeeded by Aileen Taylor Smith
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Western star Ben Johnson adds a bit of character to TCM's Summer Under The Stars - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Again directed by John Ford, this one stars Richard Widmark, Carroll Baker, Karl Malden and everyone from John Carradine and James Stewart to Edward G. Robinson, Ricardo Montalban and even Patrick Wayne, (John Wayne's son), with Johnson a mere footnote
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Are you man enough for this year's Drive Invasion? - Creative Loafing Atlanta (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Two stranded country singers spend a night in a house that features not just a gorilla, but a ring of international spies (played by Lon Chaney, Jr., Basil Rathbone and John Carradine). Incidentally, this is apparently a sequel to Las Vegas Hillbillys
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What monkeys mean in the movies - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
In 1932's Murders in the Rue Morgue, women are injected with ape blood (they die); in Return of the Ape Man (1944) Bela Lugosi swaps John Carradine's brain with that of a gorilla (again, doesn't go well). The Man Without a Body (1957) tells of an
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DVR Alert: TCM presents 'Arabs as a subject of ridicule' - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
David Butler's "Ali Baba Goes to Town'' (1937) with Eddie Cantor, Roland Young, Louise Hovick (better known as Gypsy Rose Lee) and John Carradine leads off tonight's installment of "Race & Hollywood: Arab Images on Film'' at 8 pm Eastern
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The Smell of Greasepaint, the Roar of the Crowd - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
23–24 at 7:30 pm, Sep. 25 at 2 pm Break a leg, Lemon Grove. Or, as the late John Carradine told me before going on stage, Merde! Interested in a follow-up to this article? Great, we'll send you an email as soon as a follow-up is published!
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The Nesting: - DVD Talk
Google News - over 5 years
Sleuthing, which also includes an appearance by genre vet and all around drunk guy John Carradine. The venerable thesp's appearance never was one that could guarantee a good movie, yet somehow he got some form of reputation to that extent
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Western to bring good ol' days back to Hope - Stockton Record
Google News - over 5 years
The coach is driven by Buck (Andy Devine), and the passengers include a lawman (George Bancroft), a prostitute (Claire Trevor), an embezzling banker (Berton Churchill), a gambler (John Carradine) and an alcoholic, disgraced frontier doctor (Thomas
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dvd review: Back To The 1950s - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I hadn't seen The Black Sleep (1956) since I was a kid, and all that stayed with me were the images of Lon Chaney, Jr. as a mute madman, John Carradine as a bearded prophet of doom, and the imposing Swedish wrestler Tor Johnson as another unfortunate
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Cult Movie Reviews: Andy Warhol's Bad & The Sentinel - San Diego Reader (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
It was a treat to finally re-watch, and see so many later stars like Chris Walken, Jeff Goldblum, and Beverly D'Angelo, not to mention old Hollywood faves like Burgess Meredith, Ava Gardner, and John Carradine. It's odd how the forces of God are shown
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Blu-ray Review: The Nesting - Inside Pulse
Google News - over 5 years
Academy Award winner Gloria Grahame – in her final film role – and big screen legend John Carradine (The Grapes of Wrath, Stagecoach) also play supporting roles in The Nesting. Though neither is at the top of his or her game, it is still fun to see
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10 decades of movie and TV vampires: Bloodsuckers through the years - Plain Dealer (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The 1940s: "House of Dracula" (1945): John Carradine gave us a new kind of Dracula and a new kind of vampire. Although ultimately still a predator, his Dracula was weary, struggling through the centuries with a curse and searching for a cure
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Bluebeard (1944) Movie Review - HorrorMovies.ca
Google News - over 5 years
This movie- starring John Carradine (David Carradine's father) in the role of Morrell is one I would classify as a cult classic. “Bluebeard” displays excellent camera work- there are some fantastic angles used as well as close-ups that created an
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John Carradine
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1988
    Age 82
    Retired, Carradine suffered from painful and crippling Rheumatoid Arthritis, before he died from multiple organ failure at Fatebenefratelli Hospital in Milan, Italy on November 27, 1988.
    More Details Hide Details Hours before he was stricken, he had climbed the 328 steep steps of Milan's Gothic cathedral, the Duomo. According to David Carradine, he had just finished a film in South Africa and was about to begin a European tour. David was with him, reading Shakespeare to him, when he succumbed to his condition. By the time David and Keith Carradine had arrived at their father's bedside, he was unable to speak. "I was told that his last words were 'Milan: What a beautiful place to die.'" David recalled, "but he never spoke to me or opened his eyes. When he died, I was holding him in my arms. I reached out and closed his eyes. It's not as easy as it is in the movies." There was a Requiem Mass for John Carradine at St. Thomas the Apostle Hollywood. Jane Fonda was among those in attendance. An Irish wake followed and eventually he was buried at sea.
  • 1986
    Age 80
    Robert appeared with his father in an episode of the first Twilight Zone revival television series in 1986.
    More Details Hide Details The episode segment titled "Still Life" featured Robert as a photographer who discovers an unusual camera and his father as a college professor who helps him discover the camera's secret. David's daughter, Calista, Robert's daughter Ever, and Keith's son Cade and daughter Martha Plimpton are all actors. David's daughter, Kansas, rides horses in rodeos. John's son Christopher is an architect and vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering. Explnatory notes Citations Further reading
    One of Carradine's final film appearances was Peggy Sue Got Married in 1986.
    More Details Hide Details Carradine's last released film credit was Bikini Drive-In, released years after his death. Carradine's deep, resonant voice earned him the nickname "The Voice". He was also known as the "Bard of the Boulevard," due to his idiosyncratic habit of strolling Hollywood streets while reciting Shakespearean soliloquies, something he always denied.
  • 1982
    Age 76
    In 1982, he supplied the voice of the Great Owl in the animated feature The Secret of NIMH.
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  • 1975
    Age 69
    Carradine was married a fourth time, from 1975 to 1988, to Emily Cisneros, who survived him.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1960
    Age 54
    Carradine made recurring appearances as the mortician, Mr. Gateman, on CBS' The Munsters. Carradine also appeared in both of Irwin Allen's classic 1960's science-fiction TV series "Lost In Space" and "Land Of The Giants."
    More Details Hide Details In 1985, Carradine won a Daytime Emmy Award for his performance as an eccentric old man who lives by the railroad tracks in the Young People's Special, Umbrella Jack.
    He also made more than one hundred television appearances, including CBS's My Friend Flicka, Johnny Ringo (as "The Rain Man"), and Place the Face, NBC's Cimarron City as the foreboding Jared Tucker in the episode "Child of Fear" and on William Bendix's Overland Trail in the 1960 episode "The Reckoning," on ABC's Harrigan and Son, Sugarfoot, The Rebel, and The Legend of Jesse James, and on the syndicated adventure series, Rescue 8, with Jim Davis.
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  • 1957
    Age 51
    When John Carradine married Doris (Erving Rich) Grimshaw in 1957, she already had a son from a previous marriage, Dale, and a son from a later relationship, Michael, both of whom, along with Sonia Sorel's son, Michael Bowen, are sometimes counted among John Carradine's eight sons.
    More Details Hide Details She was a one-time studio typist who typed the script to The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and who went on to play a few roles in film and television. Doris died in 1971 in a fire in her apartment in Oxnard, California. The fire was caused by a burning cigarette. She had been rescued from a similar fire just two weeks earlier. At the time of her death, she and Carradine were separated.
    Their divorce in 1957 was followed by an acrimonious custody battle, which resulted in their sons being placed in a home for abused children as wards of the court.
    More Details Hide Details Keith Carradine said of the experience, "It was like being in jail. There were bars on the windows, and we were only allowed to see our parents through glass doors. It was very sad. We would stand there on either side of the glass door crying". Eventually, Carradine won custody of the children. For the next eight years, Sonia was not permitted to see the children. Robert Carradine said that he was raised primarily by his stepmother, his father's third wife, Doris (Rich) Grimshaw, and believed her to be his mother until he was introduced to Sonia Sorel at a Christmas party when he was 14 years old. He told a journalist, "I said, 'How do you do.' Keith took me aside and said 'That's our real mother.' I didn't know what he was talking about. But he finally convinced me."
  • THIRTIES
  • 1946
    Age 40
    His Broadway roles included Ferdinand in a 1946 production of John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi, the Ragpicker in a 13-month run of Jean Giraudoux's The Madwoman of Chaillot, Lycus in a 15-month run of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and DeLacey in the expensive one-night flop Frankenstein in 1981.
    More Details Hide Details He also toured in road companies of such shows as Tobacco Road and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, in which he was properly emaciated as the cancer-ridden Big Daddy, a part, he said, which Tennessee Williams wrote for him. Carradine claimed to have appeared in more than 450 movies, but only 225 movies can be documented. His count is closer to fact if theatrical movies, made-for-TV movies and television programs are included. He often played eccentric, insane or diabolical characters, especially in the horror genre with which he had become identified as a "star" by the mid-1940s. He occasionally played a heroic role, as in The Grapes of Wrath, in which he played Casy, the ill-fated "preacher", and he occasionally played a sympathetic role, as in Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake, in which he played Blake's shipmate, who escapes with him to a tropical island full of riches.
  • 1945
    Age 39
    Carradine married Sonia Sorel (May 18, 1921 – September 24, 2004), who had appeared with him in Bluebeard (1944) immediately following his divorce from Ardanelle in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details Sonia, who had adopted the stage name of Sorel, was the daughter of San Francisco brewer, Henry Henius, granddaughter of biochemist Max Henius, and a great-niece of the historian Johan Ludvig Heiberg. Together she and Carradine had three sons, Christopher, Keith and Robert.
  • 1944
    Age 38
    They divorced in 1944, when David was seven years old.
    More Details Hide Details Carradine left California to avoid court action in the alimony settlement. After the couple engaged in a series of court battles involving child custody and alimony, which at one point landed Carradine in jail, David joined his father in New York City. By this time his father had remarried. For the next few years David was shuffled between boarding schools, foster homes and reform school.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1936
    Age 30
    By 1936, Carradine had become a member of John Ford's stock company and appeared in The Prisoner of Shark Island.
    More Details Hide Details In total, he made 11 pictures with Ford, including his first important role, as Preacher Casy in The Grapes of Wrath (1940), which starred Henry Fonda. Other Ford films in which Carradine appeared include The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and Stagecoach (1939), both with John Wayne. He also portrayed the Biblical hero Aaron in DeMille's The Ten Commandments (1956), and he dominated Hitler's Madman (1943) as Reinhard Heydrich. Carradine did considerable stage work, much of which provided his only opportunity to work in a classic drama context. He toured with his own Shakespearean company in the 1940s, playing Hamlet and Macbeth.
  • 1935
    Age 29
    Carradine was married four times. He married his first wife, Ardanelle Abigail McCool (January 25, 1911 – January 26, 1989), in 1935.
    More Details Hide Details She was mother of Bruce and David. John adopted Bruce, Ardanelle's son from a previous marriage. John had planned a large family but, according to the autobiography of his son David, after Ardanelle had had a series of miscarriages, Carradine discovered that she had had repeated "coat hanger" abortions, without his knowledge, which rendered her unable to carry a baby to full term. After only three years of marriage, Ardanelle Carradine filed for divorce, but the couple remained married for another five years.
    He adopted the stage name "John Carradine" in 1935, and legally took the name as his own two years later.
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  • 1933
    Age 27
    By 1933, he was being credited as John Peter Richmond, perhaps in honor of his friend, John Barrymore.
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  • 1927
    Age 21
    In 1927, he took a job escorting a shipment of bananas from Dallas, Texas to Los Angeles, where he eventually picked up some theater work under the name of Peter Richmond, in homage to his uncle.
    More Details Hide Details He became friends with John Barrymore, and began working for Cecil B. DeMille as a set designer. Carradine, however, did not have the job long. "DeMille noticed the lack of Roman columns in my sketches," Carradine said. "I lasted two weeks." Once DeMille heard his baritone voice, however, he hired him to do voice-overs. Carradine said, " the great Cecil B. DeMille saw an apparition - me - pass him by, reciting the gravedigger's lines from 'Hamlet,' and he instructed me to report to him the following day." He became a member of DeMille's stock company and his voice was heard in several DeMille pictures, including The Sign of the Cross. Carradine's first film credit was Tol'able David (1930), but he claimed to have done 70 pictures before getting billing. Carradine claimed to have tested, as an unknown - along with well-known leading men Conrad Veidt, William Courtenay, Paul Muni, and Ian Keith - for the title role in Dracula, but the historical record does not support the claim. The part eventually went to Bela Lugosi. Carradine would later play the Count in the Universal Studios Dracula sequels House of Frankenstein and House of Dracula. Carradine also claimed to have tested for the monster role in Frankenstein (1931), though again, there is no account other than his own that he actually did so.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1925
    Age 19
    He made his stage debut in 1925 in New Orleans in a production of Camille and worked for a time in a New Orleans Shakespeare company.
    More Details Hide Details Carradine joined a tent repertory theater under the management of R. D. MaClean, who became his mentor.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1906
    Age 0
    Born on February 5, 1906.
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