John Corigliano
American composer
John Corigliano
John Corigliano is an American composer of classical music and a teacher of music. He is a distinguished professor of music at Lehman College in the City University of New York.
Biography
John Corigliano's personal information overview.
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News
News abour John Corigliano from around the web
L.A. Opera wins two Grammys for 'Ghosts of Versailles'
LATimes - 9 days
When Los Angeles Opera took its curtain call Sunday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the usual applause grew to a roar at the appearance onstage of two shiny guests stars: Grammy Awards that the company had just won.  The company’s 2015 production of composer John Corigliano and librettist William...
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LATimes article
A Listener's Guide To The Ghosts That Haunt Opera
NPR - 4 months
Do you believe in ghosts? Composers from Mozart to John Corigliano have written them into their operas. Take a tour of some famous operatic phantoms.
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NPR article
Los Angeles Opera to Present 'Figaro Trilogy'
NYTimes - about 3 years
The company will present “The Barber of Seville,” “The Marriage of Figaro” and John Corigliano’s 1991 opera “Ghosts of Versailles”
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NYTimes article
The Manly Pursuit of Desire: High Art and Low Sex All the Way Through Evening
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Young Australian filmmaker Rohan Spong's love letter to New York and a generation of young composers who died of AIDS, "All the Way Through Evening," opens at the Village East Cinema, 189 2nd Avenue at 12th Street, on Friday, Dec. 6 for hopefully a long run. It's a beautiful, moving film about a very tender subject: artists who die young but leave us an extremely important part of themselves. How do you preserve this? How do you keep this beautiful "self" alive when it's a piece of art? The piece of art in this case is music, and, sadly enough, it's "classical" music. That is, it ain't hip hop. It ain't electronic dance music, and it definitely ain't cool. It's just gorgeous, beautiful, and heart rending. I know because I was a part of this now almost gone world. As a young poet, I became crazy about having my work set to music--and I'm still crazy about it, so by now I have about 70 poems set to the work of a dozen composers. The first one, the one who infatuated me with his ...
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Huffington Post article
'Boo!' to the Metropolitan Opera
Huffington Post - over 3 years
We know who they were, the ones who spoke out and resisted, who put their careers on the line to protest what was happening in Germany: Arturo Toscanini, Lauritz Melchior and Lotte Lehmann, to name a few. We also know the ones who didn't: Elizabeth Schwarzkopf, Herbert von Karajan, Wilhelm Furtwangler, Wieland and Wolfgang Wagner, to name a few. We also know those whose records were more equivocal: Richard Strauss and Kirsten Flagstad, to name a few. Although appreciation of artists who collaborated with the regime in varying degrees, actively or passively, has continued, just as appreciation of the works of Richard Wagner has continued notwithstanding his rabid anti-Semitism, the reputations of all these artists and composers are eternally tarnished and dogged. There is endless discussion and exhaustive intellectual acrobatics to separate their artistic achievements from their politics, prejudices and misdeeds, to exonerate and forgive them. The debates will never be resolved because t ...
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Huffington Post article
The Case for Barber and Britten
Huffington Post - over 3 years
For the past six years I have directed a festival of 20/21st century music at the University of Arizona. Any festival worthy of the name has a vision or reason for being. The premise of our model, The Music + Festival, is to contextualize the music with a musicological component, and to include added value, in a rich introductory symposium on the music and lives of the composers, and to include another aspect in regard to the music, as in movies- that feature the music of the composers-, or dance. We usually present composers in pairs, to diversify the musical palette or to express similarities of a common view. We also usually pair an American composer with a non-American composer. The first festival presented Crumb and Messiaen, both of whom bring an eclectic, naturalistic, and religio-mystical approach to their music. Both are willing to ride on the edge of kitsch to make their larger philosophical and musical points (sometimes they even get cut). With both there is an attempt to ...
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Huffington Post article
Patricia Racette Comes To The Rescue At San Francisco Opera
Huffington Post - over 3 years
NEW YORK — For Patricia Racette, this was already shaping up as a memorable year at the San Francisco Opera, opening the season in Boito's "Mefistofele" and returning in June to headline two more productions. Then, suddenly, along came "Dolores Claiborne." Less than a month ago, the American soprano agreed to take on an almost unheard-of challenge – rescuing the world-premiere production of Tobias Picker's opera based on the Stephen King novel. Mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick, for whom it was written, withdrew at the last minute, and David Gockley, the company's director, appealed to Racette to step in. "I took as thorough a look at the score as I could, and it's fiendishly difficult," Racette said in a telephone interview this week. "But I'm a quick study, and I thought, gosh, it'll be to the wire, but I think I can do this if I just pull one of my turbo-sessions." Her partner, mezzo-soprano Beth Clayton, bought a 4-foot electronic keyboard for their apartment, and they used that to ...
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Huffington Post article
“American Voice” Concert features American Composers
Atlantic Highlands Herald - over 4 years
SHREWSBURY, NJ - On June 30th, the Shrewsbury Chorale will present a concert called  “American Voice” at 8:00 PM at the Luther Memorial Lutheran Church located at 818 Tinton Ave. in Tinton Falls.  The concert will be conducted by Anthony LaGruth, conductor and artistic director and accompanied by Mark Cook.  Many of the selections in this concert are based on literary works by well-known authors.  Howard Hanson’s “Song of Democracy” is based on a text by Walt Whitman and was performed at Richard Nixon’s Inaugural Concert.  New York born composer, John Corigliano greatly admired the author Dylan Thomas, who wrote “Fern Hill”. Corigliano’s original setting of “Fern Hill” was written for his high school music teacher.  To celebrate the bicentennial of Amherst Mass., Randall Thompson was commissioned to write music to Robert Frost’s poetry.  Thompson chose 7 poems for “Frostiana” to honor the town’s famous resident.  Thompson’s “Seven Last Words of David” is taken from the Bible (II Sam ...
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Atlantic Highlands Herald article
Frugal Family: Five Deals to Stretch the Family Budget - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
9 and John Corigliano's Red Violin Concerto. Good through: Tickets available for Oct. 2 performance; check website for updates. 2. $1 Movie Rental (and get one free!): Blockbuster Express at Safeway, 10541 Connecticut Ave., 301-341-2726,
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Google News article
John Corigliano On Sept. 11: The Heartbreak Of Battle - NPR (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Iliad, about the same war, was one of John Corigliano's inspirations for his piece 'One Sweet Morning.' Greek sculptures dating from c. 500 BC, depicting a scene from the Trojan War. The Iliad, about the same war, was one of John Corigliano's
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Google News article
Hearts and Renewal: Classical Concert Picks for 9/11 - TIME
Google News - over 5 years
Composer John Corigliano wrote the piece, titled One Sweet Morning, as a song cycle for mezzo-soprano and orchestra based on four poems about war. It will have its world premiere at Avery Fisher Hall on Sept. 30. Gilbert, like Masur before him,
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Google News article
Classical Music/Opera Listings for Sept. 9-15 - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
11 attacks is a solo recital by this young Israeli cellist, whose program includes Bach's Second and Third Suites for Unaccompanied Cello and John Corigliano's “Fancy on a Bach Air.” At 2 pm, the Gilbert Court at the Morgan Library & Museum,
Article Link:
Google News article
John Corigliano On Sept. 11: The Heartbreak Of Battle - NPR (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Iliad, about the same war, was one of John Corigliano's inspirations for his piece 'One Sweet Morning.' Greek sculptures dating from c. 500 BC, depicting a scene from the Trojan War. The Iliad, about the same war, was one of John Corigliano's
Article Link:
Google News article
Wonge Bergmann/Courtesy of the artist - NPR (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
We begin our series with Steve Reich (whose "WTC 9/11" you can hear as a First Listen) and continue with Michael Gordon, John Corigliano, Ned Rorem, Christopher Theofanidis and John Adams. Although he lived and worked just blocks away from the World
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John Corigliano
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 73
    In 2011, Corigliano's song cycle, One Sweet Morning, premiered at Avery Fisher Hall by mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe and the New York Philharmonic to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the September 11 attacks.
    More Details Hide Details Other important commissions have been Chiaroscuro (1997) for two pianos tuned a quarter tone apart for The Dranoff International Two Piano Foundation, Vocalise (1999) for the New York Philharmonic, Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Poems of Bob Dylan (2003) which earned him his third Grammy Award, Symphony No. 3 Circus Maximus (2004) for the University of Texas Wind Ensemble, STOMP (2011) written for the 2011 Tchaikovsky Competition in Russia, and Conjurer (2008) commissioned by an international consortium of six orchestras for Evelyn Glennie and winning him his fifth Grammy Award. Among Corigliano's students are David S. Sampson, Eric Whitacre, Elliot Goldenthal, Edward Knight, Nico Muhly, Roger Bergs, Gary Kulesha, Scott Glasgow, John Mackey, Michael Bacon, Avner Dorman, Mason Bates, Steven Bryant, Jefferson Friedman, Jamie Howarth, Dinuk Wijeratne and David Ludwig. In 1996, The Corigliano Quartet was founded, taking his name in tribute.
  • 2001
    Age 63
    In 2001, he received the Pulitzer Prize for his Symphony No. 2 (2001).
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  • 1999
    Age 61
    Corigliano's fourth film score was for François Girard's The Red Violin (1997) which won him his second Academy Award nominations and the 1999 Oscar for best film score.
    More Details Hide Details Portions of the score were used in his violin concerto (2003), written for Joshua Bell,who premiered it on September 19, 2003 with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1995
    Age 57
    In 1995, he was commissioned to write String Quartet (1995) by Lincoln Center for the Cleveland Quartet, which won him his second Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Classical Composition.
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  • 1991
    Age 53
    In 1991, Corigliano became faculty member at the Juilliard School.
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    His first symphony won him the University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition in 1991 and his first Grammy Award for Best Classical Contemporary Composition in 1992.
    More Details Hide Details Corigliano's first and only opera, The Ghosts of Versailles, was the Metropolitan Opera's first commission in nearly three decades, celebrating the company's 100 anniversary. The opera was a huge success at the premiere and received the International Classic Music Awards Composition of the Year award in 1992.
  • FORTIES
  • 1987
    Age 49
    In 1987, Corigliano was the first composer ever to serve as Composer-in-Residence for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
    More Details Hide Details During his residency, he composed his first symphony, which was inspired by the AIDS epidemic and to honor the friends he lost.
  • 1984
    Age 46
    In 1984, he became Distinguished Professor of Music at Lehman College and left his position at Manhattan School of Music in 1986.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1974
    Age 36
    In 1974, he wrote his first film score for the documentary A Williamsburg Sampler.
    More Details Hide Details He later wrote the score for Altered States (1980) and his third film score for Revolution (1985). The award-winning score for Revolution is one of Corigliano's most impressive creations, although it is less known, as it was never released in any recorded format; it has existed in a bootleg form until Varese Sarabande officially released the score for a limited time in December 2009 through their CD club, which will be released in stores as a regular release later in 2010. Corigliano later used portions of the score in his first symphony. For flutist James Galway he composed his third wind concerto, titled Pied Piper Fantasy, which premiered with the Los Angeles Philharmonic (1982).
  • 1970
    Age 32
    In 1970, Corigliano teamed up with David Hess to create The Naked Carmen.
    More Details Hide Details In a recent communication with David Hess, Hess acknowledged that The Naked Carmen was originally conceived by Corigliano and himself as a way to update the most popular opera of our time (Carmen). Mercury Records wanted the classical and popular divisions to work together and after a meeting with Joe Bott, Scott Mampe and Bob Reno, it was decided to proceed with the project. In Hess's own words, the project was "a collective decision". After he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, Corigliano began teaching at the Manhattan School of Music and became a music faculty member at Lehman College. He credits his first two concerti for solo wind for both changing his art and his career. It was during the composition of his Oboe Concerto (1975) and especially his Clarinet Concerto (1977) that he first used an "architectural" method of composing.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1964
    Age 26
    Corigliano first came to prominence in 1964 when, at the age of 26, his Sonata for Violin and Piano (1963) was the only winner of the chamber-music competition of the Spoleto Festival in Italy.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1938
    Age 0
    Born in 1938.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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