John W. Davis
American politician
John W. Davis
John William Davis was an American politician, diplomat and lawyer. He served as a United States Representative from West Virginia (1911–1913), then as Solicitor General of the United States and US Ambassador to the UK under President Woodrow Wilson. Over a 60-year legal career, he argued 140 cases before the US Supreme Court.
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John W. Davis's personal information overview.
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CALENDAR; Westchester
NYTimes - over 5 years
A guide to cultural and recreational events in the Hudson Valley. Items for the calendar should be sent at least three weeks in advance to westweek@nytimes.com. Commemorating 9/11 ARMONK Whippoorwill Hall ''The Guys,'' a drama by Anne Nelson about a fire captain who lost most of his men in the Sept. 11 attacks, presented by the Armonk Players.
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'A second chance' Tail Gate for Dogs may rehab canines who were confiscated ... - Suburban Life Publications
Google News - over 5 years
Tail Gate co-owner John Davis started his business after experiencing frustration with other kennels when he'd go on vacation. “The dog will pretty much stay (in a cage) 24 hours a day,” he said. “And that is not good for the dog. It stresses them
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Page Four: A guide to page four - The University of Alabama Crimson White
Google News - over 5 years
When I sat down to write my first column of the year I found myself at an impasse. See, I never actually had a “final” column for this past school year due to the tornado. Chronologically, my last column from last year was a cannonball
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CALENDAR; Events in Westchester
NYTimes - over 5 years
A guide to cultural and recreational events in the Hudson Valley. Items for the calendar should be sent at least three weeks in advance to westweek@nytimes.com. Comedy PEEKSKILL Paramount Center for the Arts Jim Breuer. Aug. 28 at 8 p.m. $25 to $40. Paramount Center for the Arts, 1008 Brown Street. (914) 739-2333; paramountcenter.org. PIERMONT The
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Man Treks from Florida to Canada to Save Wildlife - Voice of America
Google News - over 5 years
August 26, 2011 Man Treks from Florida to Canada to Save Wildlife John Davis campaigns for system of connected, protected wildlife habitats Rosanne Skirble | Washington, DC John Davis is on a campaign to save American wildlife
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John Davis - Paducah Sun
Google News - over 5 years
GREENVILLE, SC — John Russell Davis, 78, the husband of Carolyn Stockton Davis, formerly of Paducah, died August 23, 2011, at his home in Greenville. Born in Morganfield, Ky., February 19, 1935, he was the son of the late John H. and Mildred Davis
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School board member John Paul Davis dies - Blount Today
Google News - over 5 years
“When you think of Blount County School System, there is one name synonymous with it, and that has been John Davis.” Cantrell remembered a few years ago when Davis took Cantrell's son fishing. "I told John my son wanted to go fishing for his birthday
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CALENDAR; Westchester
NYTimes - over 5 years
A guide to cultural and recreational events in the Hudson Valley. Items for the calendar should be sent at least three weeks in advance to westweek@nytimes.com. Comedy PEEKSKILL Paramount Center for the Arts Jim Breuer. Aug. 28 at 8 p.m. $25 to $40. Paramount Center for the Arts, 1008 Brown Street. (914) 739-2333; paramountcenter.org. Film
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Presidential candidate John Davis Jr. visits Towanda - Towanda Daily Review
Google News - over 5 years
Review Photo/BRIAN FEES Presidential candidate John Davis Jr., at right, chats Monday with Towanda residents John and Janice MacMorran in front of the Bradford County Courthouse. TOWANDA - John Davis Jr.,
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Trucking company goes after Amtrak, UP - Lahontan Valley News
Google News - over 5 years
John Davis Trucking Co. of Battle Mountain filed a countersuit Friday in US District Court in Reno against National Railroad Passenger Corp., aka Amtrak and Union Pacific. The trucking company claims the railroad company did not
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CALENDAR; Westchester
NYTimes - over 5 years
A guide to cultural and recreational goings-on in and around the Hudson Valley. Items for the guide should be sent at least three weeks in advance to westweek@nytimes.com, or by mail to Westchester Calendar, Metropolitan, 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018-1405. Comedy POUGHKEEPSIE Bananas Comedy Club Liam Connelly. Friday through July 23 at 9
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Speak softly and carry a big wrench - MyWebTimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
John Davis, a full-fledged US presidential candidate, made an appearance in Ottawa Thursday and claimed he has the tools "to fix the country." To illustrate the point, the conservative candidate constantly carries a huge red, white and blue pipe wrench
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Google+: The Social Media Endgame - The University of Alabama Crimson White
Google News - over 5 years
Facebook and I have fallen into a “married with children” type relationship. We've been at it for so long and invested so much time into one another that, despite any real flaws, we're pretty much content. Privacy concerns aside, Facebook
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Lexington's heat index hits 112 degrees; high of 93 expected Tuesday - Lexington Herald Leader
Google News - over 5 years
Firefighter John Davis, 49, of the Lexington Fire Department applied a warning sticker to a Lexington fire truck at Central Fire Station on East Third Street. The sticker is part of a campaign to prevent heat
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John W. Davis
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1955
    Age 81
    Died on March 24, 1955.
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  • 1952
    Age 78
    Yet in 1952, Justice Clark voted with the majority, even though he did not concur in the opinion; in direct opposition to his previous advice.
    More Details Hide Details Davis' legal career is most remembered for his final appearance before the Supreme Court, in which he unsuccessfully defended the "separate but equal" doctrine in Briggs v. Elliott, a companion case to Brown v. Board of Education. Davis, as a defender of racial segregation and state control of education, uncharacteristically displayed his emotions in arguing that South Carolina had shown good faith in attempting to eliminate any inequality between black and white schools and should be allowed to continue to do so without judicial intervention. He expected to win, most likely through a divided Supreme Court, even after the matter was re-argued after the death of Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson. It has also been reported that he never charged South Carolina in the first place. He declined to participate further in the case, as he did not wish to be involved in the drafting of decrees to implement the Court's decision.
    One of Davis' most influential arguments before the Supreme Court was in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer in May 1952, when the Court ruled on Truman's seizure of the nation's steel plants.
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    While Davis wasn't brought into the case until March 1952, he was already familiar with the concept of a presidential seizure of a steel mill.
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  • 1949
    Age 75
    In 1949, the Republic Steel Company, fearful of advice given to President Truman by Attorney General Tom C. Clark, asked Davis for an opinion letter on whether the President could seize private industry in a "National Emergency."
    More Details Hide Details Davis wrote that the President could not do so, unless such power already was vested in the President by law. He further went on to opine on the Selective Service Act of 1948's intent, and that seizures were only authorized if a company did not sufficiently prioritize government production in a time of crisis. Arguing for the steel industry, Davis orated for eighty-seven minutes before the Court. He described Truman's acts as an usurpation' of power, that were 'without parallel in American history. The Justices allowed him to proceed uninterrupted, with only one question from Justice Frankfurter, who may have had a personal feeling against Davis relating to his 1924 presidential campaign. It had been predicted that the President's actions would be upheld, and the injunction would be lifted, but the Court decided 6–3, to uphold the injunction stopping the seizure of the steel mills.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1933
    Age 59
    In 1933, Davis served as legal counsel for the financier J.P. Morgan, Jr. and his companies during the Senate investigation into private banking and the causes of the recent Great Depression.
    More Details Hide Details The last twenty years of Davis's practice included representing large corporations before the United States Supreme Court challenging the constitutionality and application of New Deal legislation. Davis lost many of these battles. Davis argued 140 cases before the US Supreme Court during his career. 73 were as Solicitor General, and 67 as a private lawyer. Lawrence Wallace, who retired from the Office of the Solicitor General in 2003, argued 157 cases during his career but many believe that few attorneys have argued more cases than Davis. Daniel Webster and Walter Jones are believed to have argued more cases than Davis, but they were lawyers of a much earlier era.
    Davis was implicated by retired Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler in the Business Plot, an alleged political conspiracy in 1933 to overthrow United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in testimony before the McCormack-Dickstein Committee, whose deliberations began on November 20, 1934 and culminated in the Committee's report to the United States House of Representatives on February 15, 1935.
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  • 1931
    Age 57
    From 1931 to 1933, Davis also served as president of the New York City Bar Association.
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  • 1928
    Age 54
    Davis also served as a delegate from New York to the 1928 and 1932 Democratic National Conventions.
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  • 1924
    Age 50
    1924 Democratic presidential primaries United States presidential election, 1924
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    He won the nomination in 1924 as a compromise candidate on the one hundred and third ballot.
    More Details Hide Details His denunciation of the Ku Klux Klan and his prior defense of black voting rights as Solicitor General under Wilson cost him votes in the South and among conservative Democrats elsewhere. He lost in a landslide to Calvin Coolidge, who did not leave the White House to campaign. Davis' 28.8% was the smallest percentage ever won by the Democratic presidential nominee.
    His friend and partner Frank Polk managed his campaign at the 1924 Democratic National Convention.
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    The culmination of his political career came when he ran for President in 1924 under the Democratic Party ticket, losing to Republican incumbent Calvin Coolidge.
    More Details Hide Details Over a 60-year legal career, Davis argued 140 cases before the US Supreme Court. He famously argued the winning side in Youngstown Steel. He also represented the losing side in Briggs v. Elliott, one of the companion cases to Brown v. Board of Education. Davis's great-grandfather, Caleb Davis, was a clockmaker in the Shenandoah Valley. In 1816, his grandfather, John Davis, moved to Clarksburg in what would later become West Virginia, which had a population of 600–700 at the time, and ran a saddle and harness business. His father, John James Davis, attended Lexington Law School, which later became the Washington and Lee University School of Law, and by the age of twenty, had established a law practice in Clarksburg. John J. Davis was a delegate in the Virginia General Assembly, and after the northwestern portion of Virginia broke away from the rest of Virginia in 1863 and formed West Virginia, he was elected to the new state's House of Delegates and later to the United States House of Representatives.
  • FORTIES
  • 1921
    Age 47
    Davis was a member of the National Advisory Council of the Crusaders, an influential organization that promoted the repeal of prohibition. He was the founding President of the Council on Foreign Relations, formed in 1921, Chairman of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and a trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation from 1922 to 1939.
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  • 1920
    Age 46
    Davis was a dark horse candidate for the Democratic nomination for President in both 1920 and 1924.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1913
    Age 39
    He served as US Solicitor General from 1913 to 1918 and as ambassador to the United Kingdom from 1918 to 1921.
    More Details Hide Details As Solicitor General, he successfully argued in Guinn v. United States for the illegality of Oklahoma's "grandfather law". That law exempted residents descended from a voter registered in 1866 (i.e. whites) from a literacy test which effectively disenfranchised blacks. Davis's personal posture differed from his position as an advocate. Throughout his career, he could separate his personal views and professional advocacy.
  • 1912
    Age 38
    On January 2, 1912, Davis married Ellen G. Bassel, who died in 1943.
    More Details Hide Details Davis was the cousin and adoptive father of Cyrus Vance, Secretary of State under Jimmy Carter. Davis' daughter Julia was one of the first two female journalists hired by the Associated Press in 1926. Julia married William McMillan Adams, president of Sprague International. He was the son of Arthur Henry Adams, president of the United States Rubber Company. Both father and son were aboard the luxury liner RMS Lusitania when it was sunk by a German submarine in 1915. Arthur died, his son survived. Julia and William were divorced, both remarried, she twice, and then they remarried in their old age. William had two sons, John Perry and Arthur Henry II. Julia died in 1993 with no natural children but claimed six "by theft and circumstance." His father had been a delegate to the Wheeling Convention, which had created the state of West Virginia, but he had also opposed the abolitionists, Radical Republicans, and opposed ratification of the 15th Amendment. Davis acquired much of his father's southern Democratic politics, opposing women's suffrage, Federal child-labor laws and anti-lynching legislation, Harry S. Truman's civil rights program, and defended the State's rights to establish the poll tax by questioning whether uneducated non-taxpayers should be allowed to vote. Additionally, as much as he was opposed to centralism in politics he was opposed to concentration of capitalism by supporting a number of early progressive laws regulating Interstate commerce and limiting the power and concentration of corporations.
  • 1911
    Age 37
    He represented West Virginia in the US House of Representatives from 1911 to 1913, where he was one of the authors of the Clayton Act.
    More Details Hide Details Davis also served as one of the managers in the successful impeachment trial of Judge Robert W. Archbald.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1896
    Age 22
    Before Davis had completed his first year of private practice, he was asked to come back to Washington & Lee Law School as an assistant professor, starting in the fall of 1896.
    More Details Hide Details At the time, the law school had a faculty of two, and Davis became the third. At the end of the year, Davis was asked to return but demurred. He decided that he needed the "rough & tumble" of private practice. He married Julia T. McDonald June 20, 1899, but she died on August 17, 1900. They had a daughter, Julia McDonald Davis, who married Charles P. Healy and then William M. Adams.
  • 1895
    Age 21
    He graduated with a law degree from Washington and Lee University School of Law in 1895 and was elected Law Class Orator.
    More Details Hide Details His speech gave a glimpse of his advocacy skills: The lawyer has been always the sentinel of the watchtower of liberty. In all times and all countries has he stood forth in defense of his nation, her laws and liberties, not, it may be, under a shower of leaden death, but often with the frown of a revengeful and angry tyrant bent upon him. Fellow classmates of 1895, shall we... prove unworthy? Washington and Lee University School of Law has shown great pride in Davis. In 1947, W&L began awarding the John W. Davis Prize to the graduating law student with the highest GPA. The law school has also named its intramural Moot Court Competition after Davis. After graduating from law school, Davis obtained the three signatures necessary to receive his law license (one from a local judge, and two from local attorneys, attesting to his proficiency in the law and upstanding moral character) and joined his father in practice in Clarksburg, in what was called Davis and Davis, Attorneys at Law. Davis lost his first three cases before his fortunes began to turn.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1892
    Age 18
    Davis entered Washington and Lee University at the age of sixteen. He graduated in 1892 with a major in Latin.
    More Details Hide Details He joined the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, participated in intramural sports, and attended mixed parties. He would have started law school directly after graduation, but he lacked funds. Instead, he became a school teacher for Major Edward H. McDonald of Charles Town, West Virginia. Davis taught McDonald's nine children and his six nieces and nephews, one of whom, Julia, nineteen at the time, would become Davis's wife. Davis fulfilled a nine-month contract with McDonald, but then returned home to Clarksburg and apprenticed at his father's law practice, where for fourteen months he copied documents by hand, read cases, and did much of what other aspiring lawyers did at the time.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1873
    Born
    Born on April 13, 1873.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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