John Garfield
Actor
John Garfield
John Garfield was an American actor adept at playing brooding, rebellious, working-class characters. He grew up in poverty in Depression-era New York City and in the early 1930s became an important member of the Group Theater. In 1937, he moved to Hollywood, eventually becoming one of Warner Bros. ' major stars. Called to testify before the U.S.
Biography
John Garfield's personal information overview.
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News
News abour John Garfield from around the web
Founding father of Rolling Stone reflects on career - University Daily Kansan
Google News - over 5 years
Jimi Hendrix wails, personifying his guitar through his actions. He looks, acts, and performs in a manner that will come to define what it is to be a rock star in the years to come. “You couldn't take a bad picture of Jimi Hendrix,”
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Role Models (Only Blacks Need Apply) - BernardGoldberg.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I was very much aware of boxing great Benny Leonard, football legend Sid Luckman, Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg, and any number of show business luminaries, including John Garfield, Jack Benny, George Burns, Artie Shaw, and Eddie G. Robinson
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Midlothian, City makes zoning changes - Waxahachie Daily Light
Google News - over 5 years
MIDLOTHIAN — The Midlothian City Council heard a presentation from John Garfield, director of planning, on updating the zoning ordinance during its meeting Tuesday night. The update includes revisions to the format, wording,
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Charles Walsh: This pasta sauce calls for a lawn mower - Ct Post
Google News - over 5 years
My idea of cooking is to sit in the living room watching a John Garfield movie while someone else is in the kitchen whipping up something tasty. Even when I peek in the kitchen door, the cook says emphatically: "Please, go sit down
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TCM's 'Summer Under The Stars' Aug 5: John Garfield, Hollywood's 1st 'rebel' - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Before there was James Dean, Marlon Brando or Montgomery Clift, there was John Garfield. Widely acknowledged as America's first actor to embrace grittier roles depicting working class rebels with inner torment, Garfield is TCM's celebrated star for
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John Garfield Movie Schedule: PRIDE OF THE MARINES, THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Priscilla Lane, Claude Rains, Jeffrey Lynn, John Garfield. BW-90 mins. 7:45 AM BLACKWELL'S ISLAND (1939) A reporter gets himself sent to prison to expose a mobster. Dir: William McGann. Cast: John Garfield, Rosemary Lane, Dick Purcell
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ReGroup revives 'lost' plays - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 5 years
Most of these "naturalistic" writing tics are associated with the plays of Clifford Odets ("Waiting for Lefty," "Awake and Sing"), the most famous writer in a group that also produced famous actors (John Garfield, Lee J. Cobb, Stella Adler) and
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A New Book by Jim Knipfel Explores Monsters, Brooklyn Rags and the Gowanus Canal - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
In regards to the John Garfield quote in the front of your book: “A man could spend the rest of his life trying to remember what he shouldn't have said.” What is something you regret saying? Oh, my God. I can't go through a day without saying something
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The Morning Call Sheet: July 11th, 2011 - Big Hollywood
Google News - over 5 years
John Garfield might have flirted with communism, but he never called me a Nazi. 6:00 PM EST Jailhouse Rock (1957) – After learning to play the guitar in prison, a young man becomes a rock 'n roll sensation. Dir: Richard Thorpe Cast: Elvis Presley,
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Gregg Ostrin's Kowalski - LA Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
... Elia Kazan (news Jones barely flinches at) to impress Williams — shows up three days late to audition for the role of Stanley Kowalski, which Brando will eventually land despite Williams' initial predisposition for John Garfield in the role
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DVD Extra: John Garfield at the Warner Archive, Part 2 - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Continuing last week's column chronologically through the nine John Garfield titles available at the manufacture-on-demand DVD service, we come to a pair of loan-outs -- as well as two of Garfield's very best performances. Garfield did his first work
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DVD Extra: John Garfield at the Warner Archive, Part 1 - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Mickey Borden (John Garfield): I wouldn't win first prize if I were the only entry in the contest. Ann Lemp (Priscilla Lane): Mathematically speaking, I think you'd stand a fine chance. Mickey : You think they'd let me win?
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DVD Review: The Gun Runners - Inside Pulse
Google News - over 5 years
Even with such an iconic cast, Warners revamped the Ernest Hemingway short story into The Breaking Point in 1950 with John Garfield and Patricia Neal. The studio had no problem adapting the story a third time with Audie Murphy and Eddie Albert for The
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How I Came to Settle in Farmington Hills - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
The historic John Garfield house is owned by Patch Farmington Past columnist John Willyard. John Willyard 1980 was a very tough year for me. I had to helplessly watch my father succumb to the grip of cancer and slip away from me and the rest of my
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John G. Rackliff - Seacoastonline.com
Google News - over 5 years
KITTERY, Maine — John Garfield Rackliff, 78, of Kittery, died Friday, June 17, 2011, surrounded by his loving family. John was born April 11, 1933, in the town of Industry. He was the son of the late Raymond and Kathleen Rackliff
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John Garfield
    THIRTIES
  • 1952
    Age 38
    On May 9, 1952, Garfield moved out of his New York apartment for the last time, indicating to friends it was not a temporary separation from his wife Roberta.
    More Details Hide Details He confided to columnist Earl Wilson that he would soon be divorced. Close friends speculated that it was his wife's opposition to his planned confession in Look magazine that triggered the separation. He heard that a HUAC investigator was reviewing his testimony for possible perjury charges. His agent reported that 20th Century-Fox wanted him for a film called Taxi, but would not even begin talks unless the investigation concluded in his favor. Three actor friends, Canada Lee, Mady Christians and J. Edward Bromberg, had all recently died after being listed by the committee. In the morning of May 20, Garfield, against his doctor's strict orders, played several strenuous sets of tennis with a friend, mentioning the fact that he had not been to bed the night before. He met actress Iris Whitney for dinner, and afterward became suddenly ill complaining that he felt chilled. She took him to her apartment, where he refused to let her call a doctor and instead went to bed. The next morning, she found him dead. Long-term heart problems, allegedly aggravated by the stress of his blacklisting, had led to his death at the age of 39.
    With film work scarce because of the blacklist, Garfield returned to Broadway and starred in a 1952 revival of Golden Boy, finally being cast in the lead role denied him years before.
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  • 1946
    Age 32
    In 1946, when his contract with Warner Bros. expired, Garfield decided not to renew it and opted to start his own independent production company, one of the first Hollywood stars to take this step.
    More Details Hide Details My life is an open book. I am no Red. I am no 'pink.' I am no fellow traveler. Long involved in liberal politics, Garfield was caught up in the communist scare of the late 1940s and early 1950s. He supported the Committee for the First Amendment, which opposed governmental investigation of political beliefs. When called to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, which was empowered to investigate purported communist infiltration in America, Garfield refused to name communist party members or followers, testifying that, indeed, he knew none in the film industry. Garfield rejected communism, and just prior to his death in hopes of redeeming himself in the eyes of the blacklisters, wrote that he had been duped by communist ideology in an unpublished article called "I Was a Sucker for a Left Hook", a reference to Garfield's movies about boxing. However, his forced testimony before the committee had severely damaged his reputation. He was blacklisted in Red Channels, and barred from future employment as an actor by Hollywood movie studio bosses for the remainder of his career.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1938
    Age 24
    After many false starts, he was finally cast in a supporting, yet crucial role as a tragic young composer in a Michael Curtiz film titled Four Daughters. After the picture's release in 1938, he received wide critical acclaim and a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.
    More Details Hide Details The studio quickly revised Garfield's contract—designating him a star player rather than a featured one—for seven years without options. They also created a name-above-the-title vehicle for him titled They Made Me a Criminal. Before the breakout success of Daughters, Garfield had made a B movie feature called Blackwell's Island. Not wanting their new star to appear in a low-budget film, Warners ordered an A movie upgrade by adding $100,000 to its budget and recalling director Michael Curtiz to shoot newly scripted scenes. Garfield's debut had a cinematic impact difficult to conceive in retrospect. As biographer Lawrence Swindell put it: His "honeymoon" with Warners over, Garfield entered a protracted period of conflict with the studio, they attempting to cast him in crowd-pleasing melodramas like Dust Be My Destiny and he insisting on quality scripts that would offer a challenge and highlight his versatility. The result was often a series of suspensions, with Garfield refusing an assigned role and Warners refusing to pay him. Garfield's problem was shared by any actor working in the studio system of the 1930s: by contract, the studio had the right to cast him in any project they wanted to. The forces that prevented him from getting high quality roles were really the result of the combined willpower of the Warner Bros., the studio system in general, and the general public, which also had its own perception of how Garfield (or Cagney or Bogart for that matter) should appear on screen.
  • 1935
    Age 21
    He and Roberta Seidman married in February 1935.
    More Details Hide Details Though his wife had been a member of the Communist Party, there was no evidence that Garfield himself was ever a communist. They had three children: Katherine (1938–March 18, 1945), who died of an allergic reaction; David (1943–1994); and Julie (born 1946); the latter two later becoming actors themselves. In 1954, Roberta Garfield married attorney Sidney Cohn, who died in 1991. She died in January 2004. Garfield was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for Four Daughters in 1939 and Best Actor for Body and Soul in 1948. He was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7065 Hollywood Boulevard. Doc Sportello, the protagonist in Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice, discusses his film appearances throughout the book. The John Prine song "The Late John Garfield Blues" is inspired by Garfield. He is also mentioned by John Prine in the song "Picture Show" from Prine's Grammy Award winning album "The Missing Years."
    The play opened in February 1935, and Garfield was singled out by critic Brooks Atkinson for having a "splendid sense of character development."
    More Details Hide Details Garfield's apprenticeship was officially over; he was voted full membership by the company. Odets was the man of the moment, and he claimed to the press that Garfield was his "find" and that he would soon write a play just for him. That play would turn out to be Golden Boy, but when Luther Adler was cast in the lead role instead, a disillusioned Garfield began to take a second look at the overtures being made by Hollywood. Garfield had been approached by Hollywood studios before—both Paramount and Warners offering screen tests—but talks had always stalled over a clause he wanted inserted in his contract, one that would allow him time off for stage work. Now Warner Bros. acceded to his demand, and Garfield signed a standard feature-player agreement—seven years with options—in Warner's New York office. Many in the Group were livid over what they considered his betrayal. Elia Kazan's reaction was different, suggesting that the Group did not so much fear that Garfield would fail, but that he would succeed. Jack Warner's first order of business was a change of name to John Garfield.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1913
    Born
    Born on March 4, 1913.
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