John Waters
John Waters
John Waters is a columnist with The Irish Times and former editor of Magill magazine. His career began in 1981 with the leading Irish political-music magazine Hot Press. He went on to write for the Sunday Tribune and later edited In Dublin and Magill. Waters has written several books and in 1998 he devised The Whoseday Book, a book that contains quotes, writings and pictures of 365 Irish writers and musicians - which has so far raised some €3m for the Irish Hospice Foundation.
Biography
John Waters's personal information overview.
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News
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THE NEW SEASON; Outlaws, Kings and Comedy
NYTimes - over 5 years
Dates are subject to change. For more listings: nytimes.com/theater. SEPTEMBER ARIAS WITH A TWIST Drag show, puppet show, fantastical surreal experience -- call it what you will. The collaboration between the downtown drag chanteuse Joey Arias and the master puppet maker Basil Twist, which enthralled audiences and critics in 2008, is back. Mr.
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NYTimes article
Ricki Lake Teaches Derek Hough Hairspray Dance Moves - PerezHilton.com
Google News - over 5 years
In the midst of goofing around, she teaches Derek a few moves she remembers from her days playing Tracy Turnblad in the John Waters classic, Hairspray. Sure, they're simple and dated, but we think the throwback to her iconic role would impress judges
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Google News article
John Waters in the studio - ABC Online (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But it's his long-running stage show Looking Through a Glass Onion which brings John Waters into the NSW State wide Drive studios. The acclaimed performance all-rounder took a break from touring the country to chat to John Morrison about the show,
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George Kuchar dies at 69; influential underground filmmaker - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
The Kuchars influenced such filmmakers as Brian De Palma, David Lynch and John Waters, according to the San Francisco Art Institute, where Kuchar had taught for 30 years. Kuchar died Tuesday at a San Francisco hospice following a battle with cancer, ... -
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Will You See This Movie? | John Waters's Muse Divine Gets the Doc Treatment - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Divine was best known as the muse to the king of the cult filmmakers, John Waters, starring in some of his most important films: “Pink Flamingos,” “Female Trouble” and “Hairspray.” Schwarz's film, “I Am Divine,” focuses on the actor's whole life—from
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Google News article
Interview: John Waters - King Of Outsiders, Pope Of Trash - Pedestrian TV
Google News - over 5 years
Beach House is a really great band and everything, but Baltimore's finest export is without a doubt John Waters. The pioneering trash cinema auteur of cult flicks Pink Flamingos (1972) and Hairspray (1988) - who is also an actor, writer, journalist,
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MOVIE REVIEW | 'LOVE EXPOSURE'; Teenage Romance Blossoms, Twistedly
NYTimes - over 5 years
Perverts prowl and women's panties tremble in ''Love Exposure,'' a tangled, tumultuous love story from the teeming mind of Sion Sono. Clocking in at a hair under four hours, the teenage romance of Yu (Takahiro Nishijima) and Yoko (Hikari Mitsushima) is an unexpectedly involving and relentlessly entertaining collision of contradictions. He is a
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NYTimes article
John Waters: filmmaker, bad-taste monger - Globe and Mail
Google News - over 5 years
Baltimore native John Waters, 65, with his trademark pencil-thin mustache, put a face to transgressive, shocking cinema in the 1970s when his film Pink Flamingos attracted a cult following at midnight screenings. Mainstream success followed in the
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What Spooks The Masters Of Horror?
NYTimes - over 5 years
ONE of the great things about childhood is how easy it is to access the distinct delight of being scared out of your mind. Adults just have more trouble getting goosebumps. That's because experience is the enemy of true terror. You may shriek the first time you see ''A Nightmare on Elm Street,'' but the second or third time you might only shudder.
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NYTimes article
Gualtiero Jacopetti, Maker of 'Mondo Cane,' Dies at 91
NYTimes - over 5 years
Gualtiero Jacopetti, a filmmaker who titillated and disgusted moviegoers by roaming the globe to document bizarre, not to say creepy, phenomena -- a chicken that smokes cigarettes, for instance -- in the movie ''Mondo Cane'' and its sequels, died on Wednesday at his home in Rome. He was 91. His death was widely reported in the Italian press. Mr.
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NYTimes article
John Waters Offers Advice to "The Loyal-to-Jerry MDA Kids" - San Diego Reader (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
America's fair-haired Potentate of Putrescence, John Waters, has at last decided to go public with his feelings concerning the MDA's heartless treatment of ousted Chairman of the Board and former
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'Hitchhiking's a great way to have sex' - Sydney Star Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Godfather of filth John Waters returns to our shores in October for his first national tour, stopping off in six cities. He'll treat Melbourne audiences to an encore performance of his one-man show This Filthy World; while in Sydney he'll curate and
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Norris controversy - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
Yours, etc, Sir, – John Waters's column (August 5th), has been the most correct journalism in relation to Mr Norris's withdrawal from the presidency, and I take no pleasure in what I believe is his implicit and constructive criticism of fellow Irish
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Theater review: 'Hairspray' at the Hollywood Bowl - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
Of all the mood-elevating musicals spawned in the last decade, “Hairspray,” based on John Waters' bouncy 1988 film, has always been for me the most reliably uplifting. Friday night's opening at the Hollywood Bowl, where the show touched down for a
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John Waters
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2015
    Age 60
    In 2015, he became involved with First Families First in calling for a 'No' vote in the referendum for the Thirty-fourth Amendment of the Constitution (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015.
    More Details Hide Details Waters has written a number of works of non-fiction as well as plays for radio and the stage. The title of his first non-fiction book, Jiving at the Crossroads, is a pun of Irish president Éamon de Valera's vision of a rural Ireland including "comely maidens dancing at the crossroads". In the book, Waters comments on modern Ireland. Another non-fiction work, Lapsed Agnostic, describes his "journey from belief to un-belief and back again." Waters has entered the Eurovision Song Contest on a number of occasions.
  • FIFTIES
  • 2014
    Age 59
    He wrote a weekly Friday column for The Irish Times. He was briefly fired during a dispute with the then editor, Geraldine Kennedy, but was shortly thereafter reinstated. In March 2014, Waters left the Irish Times, and shortly after started writing columns for the Sunday Independent and Irish Independent.
    More Details Hide Details Waters has referred to himself as a "neo-Luddite" or later as a "luddite". At one stage he refused to use e-mail and stated his concern that society ignores the negative aspects of the Internet.
    On 13 July 2014, he was published in the Sunday Independent in what the paper described as his first column for them.
    More Details Hide Details He has since written regular columns for that paper and its sister the Irish Independent. Waters was born in Castlerea, County Roscommon. He had a daughter in 1996 named Róisín with singer Sinéad O'Connor. He suffered from an alcohol addiction until 1989 when he gave it up completely, a decision which he says has transformed his life.
    In April 2014, Waters replied when asked if he had become depressed because of the reaction to his actions over RTÉ and Rory O'Neill: "There's no such thing.
    More Details Hide Details It's an invention. It's bullshit. It's a cop out." He was criticised by many, including Paul Kelly, founder of the suicide prevention charity Console, guidance councillor Eamon Keane, journalist Suzanne Harrington (whose late husband suffered from depression), gay rights activist Panti, charity campaigner Majella O'Donnell as well as online commenters. His former partner Sinéad O'Connor expressed concern for John Waters, saying that she thought he was suffering from depression and needed to admit it.
    Despite this, in March 2014, it was announced that John Waters had decided to stop contributing to The Irish Times.
    More Details Hide Details Reports stated that he had been unhappy at The Irish Times since the controversy.
    In February 2014 Waters' implicated fellow Irish Times journalist Patsy McGarry as the author of a handful of ad hominem Tweets, written anonymously by McGarry.
    More Details Hide Details In the piece, Waters' demonstrated an institutional bias within the Irish Times against Catholic social teaching.
    On 11 January 2014, Waters was mentioned by Irish drag queen Panti (Rory O'Neill) on RTÉ's The Saturday Night Show with Brendan O'Connor while discussing homophobia.
    More Details Hide Details O'Neill said that Waters, among other Irish journalists, was homophobic. Waters and the others mentioned threatened RTÉ and O'Neill with legal action. RTÉ subsequently removed that section of the interview from their online archive. On 25 January episode of the Saturday Night Show, O'Connor issued a public apology those named on behalf of RTÉ for being mentioned in the interview held two weeks previously. RTÉ paid monies to Waters and others mentioned. RTÉ received hundreds of complaints about the issue. A rally against the payout and censorship drew 2000 people, and the appropriateness of the payout was later discussed by members of the Oireachtas. The issue was also discussed in the European Parliament. RTÉ's head of television defended the €85,000 payout and blamed the decision mostly on Ireland's Anti-Defamation Laws.
    He was a member of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland until he resigned in January 2014, during time that he was a litigant seeking damages from the broadcaster RTÉ.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2011
    Age 56
    The case dated back to 2011 and Waters claimed that he returned to his car one minute over a 15-minute grace period.
    More Details Hide Details He refused to pay the fine as a matter of principle.
    In 2011 he sat for the painter Nick Miller (artist), the subject of a naked portrait for an Arts Lives RTÉ programme, called Naked.
    More Details Hide Details During a newspaper review on radio station, Newstalk 106, Waters declared blogs and bloggers to be "stupid". He then repeated those claims the following week, sparking controversy amongst Irish bloggers who took exception to his views. In the same interview, Waters claimed that "sixty to seventy percent of the internet is pornography". In September 2013 he was jailed for around two hours in Wheatfield Prison over non-payment of a parking fine.
  • 2010
    Age 55
    Waters attended the Electric Picnic music festival in 2010 and wrote that he felt a sense of dissatisfaction with the event, concluding that there was a lack of meaning underpinning events at the festival.
    More Details Hide Details Sunday Tribune journalist Una Mullally replied that if John Waters felt disconnected or out of place at the Electric Picnic, that it was because the country had changed, and continued "perhaps this is the first Irish generation who have purposely opted out of tormenting themselves by searching for some unattainable greater meaning and who have chosen instead just to live". In 2008, he took part in a television programme which researched his family's past. Parish records revealed that his great-granduncle, also called John Waters, died of starvation during the Great Famine.
    In the Irish National Final on 5 March 2010, the song was performed by Leanne Moore, the winner of You're a Star 2008, and finished in fourth place.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2009
    Age 54
    In a 2009 article titled "Another no to Lisbon might shock FF back to its senses" Waters voiced his opposition to gay marriage stating that it was "potentially destructive of the very fabric of Irish society".
    More Details Hide Details He is an active participant in the Catholic cultural movement Communion and Liberation. He has given at least one talk to the Iona Institute.
  • 2007
    Age 52
    "They Can't Stop the Spring", the song he co-wrote with Tommy Moran, was shortlisted for Ireland's entry to Eurovision Song Contest 2007. On 16 February 2007, "They Can't Stop the Spring" was selected on RTÉ's The Late Late Show to represent Ireland in that year's final in Helsinki.
    More Details Hide Details After a telephone vote of viewers, "They Can't Stop The Spring" won the selection. The song finished last in the European competition final, receiving only 5 points. In 2010, RTÉ announced that Waters had sought to represent Ireland again at Eurovision, with the song "Does Heaven Need Much More?", co-written with Tommy Moran.
  • FORTIES
  • 2003
    Age 48
    In his articles titled Impose democracy on Iraq and Bush and Blair doing right thing, Waters explained his support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, a position based on his belief that Iraq posed an imminent threat to the West due to its possession of weapons of mass destruction.
    More Details Hide Details He wrote an article titled Two sides to domestic violence, which criticised the lack of gender balance in Amnesty International's campaign against domestic violence in Ireland. Waters cited the National Crime Council report, conducted by the Economic and Social Research Institute, which found approximate gender symmetry in most measures of domestic violence and he pointed out that despite these statistics, funding for women victims of domestic violence (€15 million) disproportionately outstrips funding for male victims. Waters' article led to a response from the head of Amnesty International's Irish branch. Waters also devoted much of his column space in The Irish Times to discussing the role and importance of religion and faith in society. In an interview, he has described people of faith as "funnier, sharper and smarter" than atheists.
  • 1998
    Age 43
    Waters has written several books and, in 1998, he devised The Whoseday Book — which contains quotes, writings and pictures of 365 Irish writers and musicians – that raised some €3 million for the Irish Hospice Foundation.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1981
    Age 26
    Waters's career began in 1981 with the Irish political-music magazine Hot Press.
    More Details Hide Details He went on to write for the Sunday Tribune and later edited In Dublin magazine and Magill.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1955
    Age 0
    Born on May 28, 1955.
    More Details Hide Details
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