Johnny Oates
American baseball player and coach
Johnny Oates
Johnny Lane Oates was an American professional baseball player, coach, and manager. He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Baltimore Orioles, Atlanta Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Yankees from 1970 to 1981. During his playing career, Oates was a light-hitting player who was valued for his defensive skills and, played most of his career as a reserve player.
Biography
Johnny Oates's personal information overview.
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Orioles remember ex-pitcher Flanagan - Toronto Sun
Google News - over 5 years
While the likes of GMs — Pat Gillick, Jim Beattie and Syd Thrift — plus managers Johnny Oates, Phil Regan, Davey Johnson, Ray Miller, Mike Hargrove, Lee Mazzilli and Sam Perlozzo were hired and fired as they moved on to other cities, other jobs
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History Lesson: Recalling 'Friday night at the fights' at McCurdy - Frederick News Post (subscription)
Google News - over 5 years
The move didn't impress then-Orioles manager Johnny Oates. When Alexander got to the Orioles, he made him stop holding the ball for so long. n Thomas Johnson and Frederick fielded freshman football teams for the first time. Several other schools in
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Remembering the funniest man in baseball - ESPN (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Manager Johnny Oates understood Flanny's devotion to the organization, and this is why the veteran left-hander was asked to get the final outs in the final inning of the final game at Memorial Stadium, on Oct. 6, 1991. And after he struck out Dave
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Six named to Tech Hall of Fame - VT hokiesports.com
Google News - over 5 years
... Richard Bullock, Waddey Harvey, Frank Teske, George Smith, Eddie Ferrell, Jerry Claiborne, Dick Redding, Johnny Oates, Bobby Smith, George Preas, Louis Ripley, Wendy Weisend, Madison Nutter, Berkeley Cundiff, Bill Matthews, Margaret Soulen Gilbert,
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Texas Rangers Mt. Rushmore - AthlonSports.com
Google News - over 5 years
Yet, manager Johnny Oates and Nolan Ryan are the only players whose numbers have been retired by the organization. All that is to say that the Mt. Rushmore in North Texas is still maturing. Perhaps, we shouldn't etch these faces in stone quite yet
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Evan Grant: Expect to see Leonys Martin in September; who's odd man out in a ... - Dallas Morning News (subscription)
Google News - over 5 years
Could you give me an idea of some of the differences or similarities between Johnny Oates and Ron Washington, the managers who have had success here? Thanks! Evan Grant: Similarities: They both at one point played for Baltimore and the Los Angeles
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Rangers' Triple A manager reaches 1500 victories - Fort Worth Star Telegram
Google News - over 5 years
General manager Jon Daniels said that Jones, who played for the Rangers and was an assistant under Johnny Oates and Buck Showalter, has done everything the organization has asked. "People don't realize how hard the job of a Triple A manager is,"
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MLB Power Rankings: The 10 Worst Managers in MLB History - JohnJohnSaidIt.com
Google News - over 5 years
In the textbooks of history, Baltimore Orioles manager Phil Regan will appear to be nothing more than a stopgap between successful runs by Johnny Oates and Davey Johnson. Oates was fired after the strike-shortened 1994 season in which he'd gone 63-49
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A Tribe of chiefs - Sportsnet.ca
Google News - over 5 years
He joined Johnny Oates as the only Rangers managers to reach the post-season and Washington is the first to lead the club to a playoff victory, let alone a trip to the World Series. As manager of the AL all-star team, the 59-year-old extended a
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Texas Rangers Retired Numbers: Who's Next? - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
Manager Johnny Oates got his number retired after managing the Rangers for seven years, leading them to their first three playoff appearances. Nolan Ryan's 34 is a bit more interesting a case. The Rangers were Ryan's fourth team, and he didn't join
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MLB: 25 Worst Managers in History - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
The “Vulture” replaced beloved ousted manager Johnny Oates in 1995, but he only lasted one year, finishing 71-73 in 1995 with Baltimore. Although two games under .500 would make Orioles fans rejoice these days, consider that the O's were picked by many
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History Lesson: Young Joey Hammond helped clinch Babe Ruth title in 1991 - American Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
"I'd say it's tougher for four guys to pitch a no-hitter because all four guys have to be on," Baltimore manager Johnny Oates said. It marked the second time four pitchers had combined on a no-hitter. Four Oakland pitches did it in 1975
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1993: Cito and Mike Mussina: Blue Jay All-Star Moments - Bluebird Banter
Google News - over 5 years
Mussina's best chance would have been to ask his manager Johnny Oates (who was a coach on the AL team) to ask Cito to bring him in. That would have been the right way to go about things, and it might have worked. Cito is a reasonable guy
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Fascinating facts from Tuesday's games - MLB.com
Google News - almost 6 years
After the second home run of the inning (by Mike Schmidt, batting seventh), Johnny Oates singled. Eight men up, eight hits, a 7-0 lead with a man on first and no outs. So how did this streak of hits to start the game end? Down, 5-1, entering the bottom
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Melvin fits in as A's manager, strengthened by Bay Area ties - Sacramento Bee
Google News - almost 6 years
At every stop of his 10-year major league career, he absorbed the lessons of his managers: Sparky Anderson, Roger Craig, Frank Robinson, Johnny Oates. He coached under two former Bay Area players-turned-managers, Phil Garner in Milwaukee and Bob Brenly
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A cancer stat too obvious to ignore - Chicago Tribune
Google News - almost 6 years
Besides Carter, the list of contemporaries includes Bobby Murcer, Dick Howser, John Vukovich, Ken Brett, Johnny Oates, Dan Quisenberry and Tug McGraw. In seeking valid associations, epidemiologists look for "clusters," unusually large numbers of cases
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New Oakland A's manager Bob Melvin talks a good game - San Jose Mercury News
Google News - almost 6 years
But it was former Orioles manager Johnny Oates who first planted the managing seed in his brain. Melvin was playing for Baltimore in the early 1990s when he approached Oates during a game. The opposing team made a pitching change that didn't make sense
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Johnny Oates
    FIFTIES
  • 2004
    Age 58
    Oates succumbed to the tumor at age 58 at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond on Christmas Eve 2004.
    More Details Hide Details His uniform number 26 was retired by the Rangers on August 5, 2005. It is only the second number retired by the Rangers, following the 34 of Nolan Ryan. During the 2005 season, a commemorative patch was worn on all Ranger uniforms and a sign was hung on the outfield wall in his honor. Prior to Game 3 of the 2010 American League Division Series against the Tampa Bay Rays, his eight-year-old grandson, Johnny Oates II, threw out the ceremonial first pitch. In 2010, Showalter would honor his friend Oates by choosing the number 26 as he took over management of the Baltimore Orioles. Oates was posthumously inducted into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame on August 7, 2010.
  • 2000
    Age 54
    However, following a fourth-place finish in 2000 and beginning the 2001 season with an 11–17 record, Oates resigned as manager and third base coach Jerry Narron replaced him.
    More Details Hide Details Many fans, however, blamed Rangers management for the team's woes, saying that team management placed unreasonable expectations on Oates, especially after spending $252 million on free agent shortstop Alex Rodriguez. He finished his Rangers managerial career with a record of 506 wins and 476 losses. In an eleven-year major league career, Oates played in 593 games, accumulating 410 hits in 1,637 at bats for a .250 career batting average along with 14 home runs, 126 runs batted in and a .309 on-base percentage. A good defensive player, he ended his career with a .987 fielding percentage. Oates was considering returning to managing when he was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme. Doctors gave Oates only about a year to live, but he survived for over three years—enough time to attend his daughter's wedding, his grandchild's birth, and his induction into the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame at The Ballpark in Arlington. During the ceremony at The Ballpark, he was given a standing ovation as Oates, weakened by the cancer and its treatment, required the help of his wife Gloria and a cane to walk. During his address to the crowd, he said he hoped it would be his friend, then-Rangers manager Buck Showalter, who would finally lead the team to a World Series victory. This never happened as Showalter was fired after the 2006 season, but Showalter's successor, Ron Washington guided the team to its first World Series appearance four years later.
  • 1998
    Age 52
    Oates continued to lead the Rangers for several more seasons, leading them to American League West titles in 1998 and 1999.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1996
    Age 50
    Oates won the 1996 American League Manager of the Year Award that year, sharing honors with the Yankees' Joe Torre.
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    Despite being let go by the Orioles, Oates was quickly hired by the Texas Rangers, who had just fired their previous manager, Kevin Kennedy. Oates proceeded to lead the Rangers to their first playoff appearance in team history during the 1996 season.
    More Details Hide Details Despite the team's poor ERA (the team averaged 4.65 collectively), the Rangers' batting lineup was incredibly potent, featuring Iván Rodríguez, Will Clark, Mark McLemore, Dean Palmer, Rusty Greer, Juan González, and Mickey Tettleton; the team finished 90–72.
  • 1994
    Age 48
    However, following the strike-shortened 1994 season, Oates was dismissed by new owner Peter Angelos.
    More Details Hide Details He finished his Orioles managerial career with a record of 291 wins and 270 losses.
  • 1993
    Age 47
    In his first full season with the team, Oates led the Orioles to an 89–73 record and then to an 85–77 record in 1993, which helped him to win The Sporting News Manager of the Year Award.
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  • 1991
    Age 45
    The following year, he was promoted to the majors where he worked as first base coach under Frank Robinson, and in 1991, after Robinson started 13–24, Oates was promoted to the manager of the Orioles.
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  • 1988
    Age 42
    He rejoined the Orioles organization at their Rochester AAA affiliate in 1988.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1984
    Age 38
    From 1984 to 1987, he worked as a coach for the Chicago Cubs and was credited with developing Jody Davis into a Gold Glove Award winning catcher.
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  • 1982
    Age 36
    Oates began managing in baseball in 1982 when he guided the New York Yankees' Double-A Nashville Sounds to win the Southern League title.
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  • 1980
    Age 34
    Oates served as a back up to Rick Cerone during the 1980 season before playing in his final game on May 24, 1981 at the age of 35.
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    He became a free agent and signed a contract to play for the New York Yankees on April 4, 1980.
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  • 1979
    Age 33
    Oates' playing time decreased further in 1979 as he appeared in only 26 games before being released at the end of the season.
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  • 1978
    Age 32
    In 1978, Oates appeared in only 40 games as the Dodgers repeated as Western Division champions and, once again defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1978 National League Championship Series.
    More Details Hide Details The 1978 World Series was also a repeat of the previous year as, the Dodgers once again lost to the Yankees in a six-game series.
  • 1977
    Age 31
    With the Dodgers, Oates worked as a second-string catcher behind Steve Yeager and, would once again reach the post-season as, the Dodgers clinched the 1977 National League Western Division title. The Dodgers went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1977 National League Championship Series before eventually losing to the New York Yankees in the 1977 World Series.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1976
    Age 30
    After the season, he was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers on December 20, 1976.
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    Oates had one plate appearance as a pinch hitter in the 1976 National League Championship Series as the Phillies lost to the eventual world champion Cincinnati Reds.
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    He returned to help the Phillies win the 1976 National League Eastern Division pennant.
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    Oates had been designated to platoon alongside catcher Bob Boone in the 1976 season however, in the season-opening game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, he cracked his collar bone in a collision at home plate with Dave Parker and missed almost half the season. "That play changed my career", he said afterwards.
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  • 1975
    Age 29
    Oates spent two seasons with the Braves, platooning alongside Paul Casanova and then Vic Correll, before being traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in May 1975.
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  • 1972
    Age 26
    On November 30, 1972, he was traded along with Pat Dobson, Roric Harrison and Davey Johnson to the Atlanta Braves for Taylor Duncan and Earl Williams.
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    Oates was brought back up to the Orioles for the 1972 season, where he caught the majority of the Orioles games.
    More Details Hide Details His defensive skills became apparent as he led American League catchers with a .995 fielding percentage.
  • 1971
    Age 25
    Oates returned to the minor leagues in 1971, playing another season with Rochester where he posted a .277 batting average along with a respectable .364 on-base percentage.
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  • 1970
    Age 24
    Oates was not on the post-season roster for The Orioles that won the 1970 World Series.
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    He continued his climb up the minor league ladder in 1970, playing for the Triple-A Rochester Red Wings before making his major league debut with the Baltimore Orioles at the age of 24 on September 17, 1970.
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  • 1969
    Age 23
    After two seasons with Miami, Oates moved up to the Dallas-Fort Worth Spurs in 1969 where he hit for a .288 batting average in 66 games.
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  • 1967
    Age 21
    He began his professional baseball career with the Bluefield Orioles and then the Miami Marlins in 1967 at the age of 21.
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    Born in Sylva, North Carolina, Oates graduated from Prince George High School in Prince George, Virginia, before going on to Virginia Tech in Blacksburg. He was selected by the Baltimore Orioles as their first round pick in the 1967 Major League Baseball Secondary Draft.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1946
    Age 0
    Born on January 21, 1946.
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