Joie Lee
American actress
Joie Lee
Biography
Joie Lee's personal information overview.
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Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Joie Lee
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News
News abour Joie Lee from around the web
This Week in Movie History: 'She's Gotta Have It' Launches a Film Renaissance - Moviefone (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Joie Lee would appear in several of her brother's films and wrote his movie 'Crooklyn,' a roman a clef about their childhood. The small role of Dr. Jamison was the first credit for S. Epatha Merkerson, who would go on to star on TV's 'Law & Order' for
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Google News article
Spike Lee's SHE'S GOTTA HAVE IT is sexy, silly and serious - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
It's fun to see members of his family play key roles in the production, from his sister, a young Joie Lee, playing Nola's former roommate, to his father, Bill Lee, doubling up as Nola's onscreen father as well as composer of the film's jazzy score
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Google News article
'She's Gotta Have It': Then and Now - The Root
Google News - over 5 years
Joie Lee played Clorinda Bradford, Nola's old roommate. Spike's sister later appeared in many of his films, including School Daze, Do the Right Thing, Mo' Better Blues and Crooklyn. In the 2000s, Lee pulled away from her brother and began writing and
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Google News article
Uplift The Race – Three Spike Lee Joints - Movies I Didn't Get
Google News - almost 6 years
Even Sal (Danny Aiello) is, in effect, the benevolent plantation owner: he is kind to Mookie, Da Mayor (Ossie Davis) and his black customers but, like many slave-time plantation owners, lusts after Jade (Joie Lee) and, ultimately, is not above using
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MOVIE REVIEW | 'FULL GROWN MEN'; He'll Hold His Breath Until You Call Him a Man
NYTimes - over 8 years
Spending 80 minutes with Alby Cutrera (Matt McGrath), the insufferable protagonist of ''Full Grown Men,'' a serious road comedy about arrested development, is excruciating enough. But it is hard to imagine why any sane woman would actually marry and have a child with this unemployed 35-year-old cartoonist, who has the emotional maturity of a
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FILM REVIEW; Marks Mysterious and Foundlings Sad: O, Tangled Web!
NYTimes - almost 10 years
Guy Maddin's ''Brand Upon the Brain!'' takes place in an orphanage where tiny tots earn their keep by the sweat of their brows and adults exact a savage price on their tender souls. A baroque entertainment with one foot in silent cinema and the other gingerly toeing the sound waves, the film centers on a man who, in visiting the now-emptied
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WHAT'S ON TONIGHT
NYTimes - almost 12 years
8 P.M. (History) SLAVE CATCHERS, SLAVE RESISTERS -- Making the American slavery system work required constant policing, with community patrols in the South and slave catchers (above) everywhere. But sometimes, in the North, those bounty hunters ran up against armed free blacks, determined to protect runaways. This special is part of the channel's
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FILM REVIEW; An Episodic Ride Full of Serial Sipping and Smoking
NYTimes - almost 13 years
You would expect a movie called ''Coffee and Cigarettes'' to be leisurely, even indolent. To grab a smoke or a cup of coffee, after all, is the preferred way to take a break -- from work, from the stressful routines of ordinary life, from the rush of indistinguishable moments that make up our days. Or at least it used to be, before we starting
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HOME VIDEO; 'Right Thing' On Special DVD
NYTimes - about 16 years
'' 'Do the Right Thing' isn't the movie to end all movies about race relations,'' Spike Lee said the other day. Probably not, but almost 12 years after it was made his film still stands as one of the most vivid on the subject. For proof, one need only explore a first-rate new DVD special edition from the Criterion Collection. Extras are in
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The Spoken Word
NYTimes - almost 24 years
"WOMEN IN FILM: YOU GO GIRLS!" Flatbush and DeKalb Avenues, Flatbush, Brooklyn. A panel discussion featuring Julie Dash, the director of "Daughters of the Dust"; the producer Grace Blake, the actress Joie Lee and others, part of the Spike Lee 40 Acres Film Institute lecture series. Saturday at 11 A.M. Admission: $25; $15 for college students; $10
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Review/Film; Father, Son and One Dead Fish
NYTimes - over 24 years
"Fathers and Sons" is actually about only one father -- Max Fish (Jeff Goldblum), a former bad-boy movie director now living in mock-modest circumstances on the Jersey Shore -- and one son (Rory Cochrane). Beyond that, it is in no way succinct. As written and directed by Paul Mones, this is the torpid, myopic story of two brooding loners in a cute
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FILM; Love and Hate in Black and White
NYTimes - almost 26 years
"Jungle Fever," Spike Lee's new film, opens with a still photograph of Yusuf K. Hawkins, the black teen-ager killed by a white mob in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn two summers ago. But if the screen had remained blank, the memory of that murder would have suffused "Jungle Fever" just as palpably, for it explores the nexus of race, sex and
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Opening Night: Fashion; MY FAIR LADIES
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: Sure, acting is real rough stuff. But rougher still is that grand public relations horror, opening night. It's not easy to grin for the paparazzi when one senses the review hounds sniffing about. And for certain reluctant actresses, dressing up is the hardest part. It's all extremely problematic for Joie Lee because she just doesn't shop. And
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FILM VIEW; Spike Lee Riffs About an Artist, Not a Genius
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: Spike Lee has done it again with ''Mo' Better Blues,'' his new film about black musicians that he describes as an answer to Clint Eastwood's ''Bird'' and Bertrand Tavernier's '' 'Round Midnight.'' As did his earlier films, ''Mo' Better Blues'' exists not only as a movie, as an end in itself, but also as a social phenomenon. Spike Lee has done
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Review/Film; Spike Lee's Middle-Class Jazz Musician
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: SPIKE LEE is an exhilarating mix of brilliance and bravado, of artist, businessman and preacher. In his stylized visions of our racially tense society - the small-scale sexual comedy ''She's Gotta Have It,'' the inventive musical ''School Daze'' and the astounding political and moral drama ''Do the Right Thing'' - he dares viewers and the
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FILM; Spike Lee and the 'Slavery' of the Blues
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: In one of the earliest sequences of ''Mo' Better Blues,'' Spike Lee's new film about jazz, the camera lingers almost lecherously over the womanly curves of a trumpet and saxophone. As simple as the shot seems at that moment, over the course of the movie it becomes a powerful and shifting metaphor, as Mr. In one of the earliest sequences of
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Review/Film; Things That Can Happen When People Fall in Love
NYTimes - almost 27 years
LEAD: Love that blooms in Murky Springs, Mo., may be no more predictable than it is anywhere else, but it is positively more apocalyptic. Elaine, a petty thief, is the daughter of country-and-western singers who emigrated from central Europe, and Joe is a gun-carrying young man who seems descended from James Dean. Love that blooms in Murky Springs,
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CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; Spike Lee Stirs Things Up at Cannes
NYTimes - almost 28 years
It's the dawn of a day that's going to be the longest and hottest of the summer. Mr. Senor Love Daddy, Bedford-Stuyvesant's favorite disk jockey, starts his wake-up show at top volume, ''doing the nasty to your ears, playing the platters that matter.'' He also opens Spike Lee's third and most accomplished film to date, the anatomy of a vicious
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THE POP LIFE
NYTimes - about 28 years
LEAD: 'Mystery' Music When Roy Orbison died of a heart attack last December, he was on the brink of one of the most remarkable comebacks in pop history. This week, the singer - whose posthumously released album, ''Mystery Girl'' (Virgin) makes its debut on Billboard's pop-album chart at No. 55 - has more records on the chart than any other artist.
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joie Lee
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