Joseph A. Wright
American ambassador
Joseph A. Wright
Joseph Albert Wright was the tenth Governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from December 5, 1849 to January 12, 1857, most noted for his opposition to banking. His positions created a rift between him and the Indiana General Assembly who overrode all of his anti-banking vetoes. He responded by launching legal challenges to the acts, but was ruled against by the Indiana Supreme Court.
Biography
Joseph A. Wright's personal information overview.
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Derby museum trust scheme could be extended - BBC News
Google News - over 5 years
The city council believes this would make Derby Museum, the Silk Mill, and the Joseph Wright Museum easier to fund and more flexible to run. The Silk Mill has closed for two years in an attempt to save £400000. A report has suggested the plan should be
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Champions rocked - Northumberland Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
New boys Alston had Jake Shepherd, Oliver Cartwright and Joseph Wright on target as they secured their first win, 3-1 at Cramlington United, with James Harrison scoring for the home side. Whickham Lang Jacks also took their first three points in a 3-2
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West Hill School GCSE results 2011 - Manchester Evening News
Google News - over 5 years
... Whitehead 11.5(11.5),Bradley Whittle 4(9.5),Ross Wick 13(13),Jack Williams 1(6.5),Alex Winters 12.6(12.6),Xavier Winters 12(12),Evan Wood 5(9),Josh Wood 9(11),Thomas Wray 4(10.5),Joseph Wright 5(8.5),Idrees Yousaf 2(10.5),Kamran Yousaf 10(10)
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Professor Wright and Professor Skeat - OUPblog (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Today I would like to speak about Joseph Wright (1855-1930). He was not an etymologist in the strict sense of this term, but no article on the origin of English words can do without consulting The English Dialect Dictionary he edited
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St. Agnes Church in Old Jefferson honors married couples - NOLA.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
... Anthony Frachina, trustee; Robert Velez, trustee; Bill Renton, trustee; Joseph Wright, lecturer; Ronald Nagel, warden; and Hunter Stewart, inside guard. The council raised more than $1100 and presented several baby items to Access Pregnancy Center
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Do You Know these people? Reward offered! - Mendota Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Her grandparents were Joseph Wright Beattie and Lydia Bowen Beattie. She had one brother, Oscar Wallace Beattie. Ms. Beattie was the last member of her family. By the clothing in the paintings, the portraits can be dated to the 1850s
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Browser's Delight - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Portraits by Joshua Reynolds and Joseph Wright show clear-eyed Augustans full of Johnsonian sense, exquisite manners and grace, while the landed gentry's painter of choice, Arthur Devis, painted married couples at home in charmingly naïve fashion
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New football coach in charge at Fayetteville Christian - Fayetteville Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Senior quarterback Joseph Wright has already seen the results. "I can tell that our guys are physically stronger," Wright said. "We have more pride and determination than we've had before." With an offseason program in place, the season scheduled,
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Move To The City, Save The Rainforest - Fast Company
Google News - over 5 years
Scientists Joseph Wright and Helene Muller-Landau of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute have made waves by suggesting that secondary growth forests are expanding at a phenomenal rate--for every acre of land deforested each year,
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Freetown-Lakeville Middle School posts honor roll - Middleboro Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
... John Sargent, Allyson Seablom, Abigail Silvia, Erin Stanley, Heather Staples, Meleia Stephens, Phillip Stephens, Jack Storms, Brittany Tainsh, Claudia Tower, Holly Turner, Bryce Vickery, Mitchell Waldron, Zachary Wedge, Kaeli Wilson, Joseph Wright,
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Reality-TV gal courts trouble - New York Post
Google News - over 5 years
Ali, 27, is charged with assault for allegedly slashing bouncer Joseph Wright during an altercation at the popular SoHo nightspot Greenhouse this past January. The bouncer needed 50 stitches on his face and in his mouth, said his lawyer,
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Caleb King thanks UGA, will enter NFL supplemental draft - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Joseph Wright said. Wright said Christensen was arrested outside the Brass Rail bar for first degree sexual assault, resisting arrest and failure to comply. Prosecutors would decide on formal charges and Christensen would be arraigned on Monday,
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COURT ROUNDUP - Coshocton Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
» Joseph Wright, 28, Fourth Street, West Lafayette, was sentenced to nine months in prison on receiving stolen property, a fifth-degree felony. He also was ordered to pay restitution, shared with a co-defendant, in the amount of $4496 for items stolen
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Cleveland police officer who shot man in Parma identified - Plain Dealer (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Craska and Patrolman Joseph Wright then tackled Correa to the ground and placed him in handcuffs, the suit states. The city, in a response to the suit, acknowledged that Correa was on his knees when shocked but maintained that he would not follow
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DESIGN; A Niche of Stylish Power
NYTimes - over 5 years
LONDON -- Design has always been a man's world, at least it was until very recently. Just look in design history books. You'll see lots and lots of men, starting with the first industrial designers, mostly eminent artists, like Charles Le Brun, who designed tapestries for Gobelins in 17th-century France, and George Stubbs, whose ceramics were
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A Niche of Stylish Power - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
He encouraged gifted artists, such as Stubbs, John Flaxman and Joseph Wright, to design for the company and undertook ambitious projects. Among them was the Green Frog Service, commissioned in 1773 by Catherine the Great, empress of Russia
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Björk at Manchester International Festival, review - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
It felt like a recreation of the Joseph Wright painting, An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump, as the audience gathered in the gloaming to see what fantastical wonders would be unveiled by this strange travelling scientist before them
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Heanor campus closes ahead of a major refurbishment - Ripley Today
Google News - over 5 years
... former Heanor Grammar School, is currently used by art and design, games development, IT and business students who will be relocated to other college sites including Field Road, in Ilkeston, and the Roundhouse and Joseph Wright Centre, in Derby
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joseph A. Wright
    FIFTIES
  • 1867
    Age 56
    Died on May 11, 1867.
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  • 1864
    Age 53
    Fairbank reportedly received over 30,000 lashes in jail until he was pardoned in 1864.
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  • 1863
    Age 52
    Wright returned to Berlin in 1863 and remained there until his death on May 11, 1867.
    More Details Hide Details His body was returned to the United States and he was buried in New York City. The Wright Quadrangle student housing dorm at Indiana University was named after Joseph A. Wright. Notes Bibliography
    He remarried again in 1863 to Caroline Rockwell who returned with him to Germany after Abraham Lincoln reappointed Wright to serve as the Ambassador to Prussia.
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  • 1862
    Age 51
    Wright was appointed to serve as Senator in his place from February 24, 1862 until his replacement was elected and took the seat on January 14, 1863.
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  • 1861
    Age 50
    Wright was in Germany when the American Civil War began, and he quickly returned home, arriving in Indianapolis on September 7, 1861, and openly supported the Union cause. In 1861, a letter was intercepted addressed to "His Excellency, the President of the Confederate States of America", and was from Senator Bright, offering advice on procuring weapons.
    More Details Hide Details The Senate moved switly to expel Bright, and exiled him from the country on charges of disloyalty. Governor Oliver P. Morton seized Bright's Indiana estate for use a military post, and Bright was left ruined and impoverished.
  • FORTIES
  • 1857
    Age 46
    Wright accepted appointment by President Buchanan to serve as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Prussia from 1857 until 1861.
    More Details Hide Details While he was away, Bright had Wright and many others officially thrown out of the party.
    With his legal options exhausted, Wright took the fight back to the legislature in 1857, giving a scathing speech accusing the body of many different violations of public good-will.
    More Details Hide Details He went on to say that "the means and applications brought to bear to secure passage of charter, would if exposed, exhibit the nakedest exposition of fraud and corruption that ever disgraced the Legislature of this state". The Senate responded by creating a commission to look into the accusations made by the Governor. Although only a few minor infractions were found, the committee agreed that the circumstances surrounding the passage of the bill were questionable and recommended the bank's charter be revoked, but no action was taken. In 1854, the first cracks in the state Democratic Party began to show after the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act by Congress. Bright and his faction, a majority of the party, began forcing out anti-slavery members of the party leadership, using support of the act as a litmus test of party loyalty. By then the national debate over the possible break-up of the Union had begun. The Whig party was also on the brink of collapse, and a new coalition party of former Whigs, former Democrats, the anti-immigration Free Soil party, and the anti-slavery Liberty Party came together. The result was the so-called Know-Nothing Party and the first real challenge to Democrat control of the state in a generation. The 1854 mid-term election caused the Democrats to lose seats in the Senate, but still maintain control. The Democrats did, however, lose their majority in the house.
  • 1855
    Age 44
    In 1855, another bill was passed to permit the Bank of Indiana to incorporate privately, and was also vetoed by Wright.
    More Details Hide Details The General Assembly again overrode his veto with a super-majority. Before the passage of law that permitted the bank to reincorporate, Wright personally delivered a speech to the House of Representatives in which he harangued the bank and accused them of "corruption and fraud", and alluded that the bank had bribed members of the General Assembly to pass the bill. Wrights speech put him at odds with the Democrat-controlled legislature and severely hurt his relationship with them, including the Lieutenant Governor, who was a major supporter of the bill. Unhappy with the outcome of the situation, Wright decided to continue in his attempt to prevent the new bank from operating and launched lawsuits against the bill and the bank in the state courts. He demanded that the courts declare the law "null and void", but the circuit courts ruled against him. He appealed to the Indiana Supreme Court, who ultimately ruled in favor of the bank.
  • 1854
    Age 43
    Wright remarried to Harriet Burbridge on August 15, 1854, and the couple had one daughter Harriet died in October 1855.
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  • 1852
    Age 41
    He ran for governor again in 1852 under the new constitution - with an extended four year gubernatorial term - defeating against Whig Nicholas McCarty, and Free Soiler John Cravens.
    More Details Hide Details Wright won again with 95,576 votes to McCarty's 73,641, and Craven's 3,308. There was a brief contention about the legality of his second term. The new state constitution banned governors from serving consecutive terms, but it was decided that because his original term occurred under the old constitution, he was still eligible to serve.
    His primary opponent during his term remained Jesse D. Bright, who led his faction of the party against Wright on many different measures. Bright continued to antagonize Wright, and at the party's 1852 convention Bright was able to keep a large number of delegates from casting a vote in an attempt to bog down proceedings and keep Wright from being nominated to run again for Governor.
    More Details Hide Details Despite the attempt, Wright did win.
  • 1851
    Age 40
    In 1851, Wright vetoed the state's Free Banking Act, which revoked the Bank of Indiana's monopoly within the state and allowed new banks to open in Indiana.
    More Details Hide Details The bill was returned to the General Assembly who passed it and overrode his veto.
    During his administration Indiana adopted its current constitution, and Wright was a driving force in its adoption in 1851 election.
    More Details Hide Details Wright was a delegate at the convention where he championed the cause of tax reform, primarily by defining what could and could not be taxed by the state property tax and the creation of a bureau to manage the state's penal and benevolence institutions. The constitution also authorized a major reorganization of the state school system, which was enacted in 1852 with Wright overseeing many parts of the reform. He personally oversaw the creation of school boards across the state and placed tax collectors to begin collecting the revenues for the boards. He also oversaw the creation of the State Board of Education and the State Agricultural Board. Wright was an avid supporter of agriculture and created the State Board of Agriculture to help encourage and assist farm growth in Indiana. Among its early achievements, the first Indiana State Fair was organized in 1851.
    As governor, Wright nevertheless signed the arrest warrant for Methodist minister for Calvin Fairbank, who helped slaves escape from Kentucky on the Underground Railroad. As a result of Wright's signature, Fairbank was kidnapped by Kentuckians in Jeffersonville, Indiana in 1851, dragged to Kentucky for trial, and sentenced to fifteen years' imprisonment under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1849
    Age 38
    He was elected to governor, winning by 9,778 votes and took office on December 5, 1849.
    More Details Hide Details During the same election, the electorate also approved a constitutional convention to replace the Constitution of Indiana.
    For his loyalty, Whitcomb guaranteed Wright's nomination for governor in the state's 1849 Democrat Convention where Whitcomb presided.
    More Details Hide Details The state party had a major divide on the slavery issue and the internal improvement projects. Whitcomb tried to accommodate both side by taking the anti-slavery position and the anti-internal-improvement position. The Whigs fielded John Matson to run again Wright in the election. The campaign focused almost exclusively on the issue of slavery and on which party was best positioned to prevent the extension of slavery into Indiana and the western territories, and which party was to blame for the state's bankruptcy which had finally been resolved in 1847. Wright had the most public record of opposing slavery as a congressman, and that seemed to help him in his decisive win at the polls.
    In 1849, Wright backed Whitcomb in his failed bid for the United States Senate against pro-slavery state Democrat leader Jesse D. Bright.
    More Details Hide Details Wright considered Bright to be his greatest foe, and on every occasion possible attempted to thwart his political success.
  • 1845
    Age 34
    He had been a supporter of the independence of the Republic of Texas while in Congress and was appointed by President James Polk to serve as the United States Commissioner to Texas in 1845, a diplomatic post he held throughout the Mexican-American War until the annexation of Texas.
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    He was defeated in his 1845 reelection campaign by 171 votes.
    More Details Hide Details He ran again in 1847, but was again defeated in a close election. His popularity in a Whig district further helped his standing in the party.
  • 1843
    Age 32
    At Tilghman's suggestion he ran for Congress in 1843 in his Whig dominated district and won election narrowly, by only three votes.
    More Details Hide Details In Congress he opposed the expansion of slavery, but opposed abolition in favor of colonization and gradual emancipation.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1840
    Age 29
    After the 1840 legislative session, Wright reopened his law office with a new partner, congressman Tilghman A. Howard, a friend of the governor and President Andrew Jackson.
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  • 1839
    Age 28
    He ran for the Indiana State Senate in 1839.
    More Details Hide Details The campaign was hard fought, occurring in the same year that the Indiana Territory's popular former governor, William Henry Harrison, became President of the United States. Wright ran against Whig candidate Edward W. McGaughty, in a "bitter and strenuous" campaign. In one of his opponents tracts, Wright was referred to as the "Infidel Dog who dares to open his God-deyfing lips" against Harrison. Wright narrowly won the election by 171 votes. The election caused a great deal of personal animosity between Wright and the Whig party.
  • 1838
    Age 27
    He left the General Assembly to become the prosecuting attorney of the Indiana 1st circuit in 1838, but found he did not like the constant traveling and resigned the following year.
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  • 1836
    Age 25
    In 1836, supporting internal improvements, he ran again and was elected to serve a second term; it was during the height of the state's internal improvement craze and he voted for the implementing act.
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  • 1832
    Age 21
    Through his law office, Wright became a friend of state representative William Perkins Bryant. In 1832, Bryant moved to Kentucky, leaving his seat vacant, and urged Wright to take it.
    More Details Hide Details With his support, Wright was elected and served as Park County's representative to the Indiana House of Representatives, serving a one-year term. During the term he supported the charter for the Bank of Indiana, an unpopular act in his district, and he was defeated in his reelection bid.
  • 1831
    Age 20
    She was an ardent Methodist who converted Wright before the couple married on November 30, 1831.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had a son, but Louisa's poor health and several bouts with malaria prevented her from having more children, leading them to adopt a daughter in 1832. Wright became very active in the Methodist Church and an outspoken advocate of Sunday School and religious study in public schools. Much of his early support came from the church and many of his campaign rallies were held in Methodist churches.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1828
    Age 17
    He graduated in 1828 and decided to become a lawyer.
    More Details Hide Details He studied law in the office of Craven Hester, one of southern Indiana's leading judges and political figures, and was admitted to the bar in 1829. He then moved to Rockville where he opened a law practice where he met Louisa Cook, the daughter of a wealthy local farmer.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1820
    Age 9
    He moved with his family to Bloomington, Indiana in 1820, where he attended public school.
    More Details Hide Details His father was a bricklayer, and worked as one of the laborers who built the first halls of Indiana State Seminary (now Indiana University). He was the brother of future Iowa Senator George G. Wright. His father died when he was fourteen, and his family become impoverished. Wright worked as a janitor, bell ringer, and occasional bricklayer, in order to pay for his schooling and provide income for his family. Living in Bloomington, he was able to attend the seminary while living at home, making the education affordable for him. Many of his classmates were from wealthier families, and he earned money by selling them nuts and fruits he picked in the forest around his home. Wright received a classical education, learning Greek and Latin.
  • 1810
    Born
    Joseph Albert Wright was born in Washington, Pennsylvania on April 17, 1810 the son of John and Rachel Seaman Wright.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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