Julia Cameron
American writer
Julia Cameron
For the British photographer, see Julia Margaret Cameron. Julia B. CameronBorn Template:Safesubst:March 4, 1948 (age 63)Template:Safesubst:Libertyville, Illinois, U.S. Disappeared Template:Safesubst: Template:Safesubst:Died Template:Safesubst:Template:Safesubst:Resting place Template:Safesubst:Template:Safesubst:Residence New York City, New York, U.S.
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4 Ways To Make Space In Your Brain To Create
Huffington Post - 2 months
This article first appeared on QuietRev.com This is the second article in Quiet Revolution’s two-part series on seeking creativity. Check out last week’s piece to learn about the ways you can hack your environment to help you channel your creativity more effectively. We’d enjoy nothing new without creativity. For extroverts, new ideas can come from external stimulation: collaborating with cross-disciplinary teams within the workplace, jamming with artistic friends, or attending group classes or meetups. Introverts, though, usually hit their creative peak in lower-stimulation environments. In today’s over-stimulated world, this means introverts often have to work to carve out time for themselves. Sure, many on the quieter end of the spectrum also gain inspiration from the outside world, but then they need time for the ideas they’ve collected to incubate. Whether you have 20 minutes a day or an entire weekend, use the four strategies below to make space in your brain so yo ...
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Huffington Post article
Journaling Could Be The First Step To Changing Your Life
Huffington Post - about 1 year
The Question: Should I journal? The Answer: Yes. We'll explain with the help of Jennell Charles, a registered nurse and professor at Clayton State University’s School of Nursing. Charles is a longtime fan of journaling, which she’s been doing for 25 years. In 2010, she wrote an essay in the journal Creative Nursing about how journaling can be an essential tool for nurses to practice self-care, which can mitigate the pressures of a stressful clinical environment and prevent professional burn out. But everyone can benefit from a little journaling, she maintains. Here are a few basic facts about the practice and tips on how to get started. What is journaling? Journaling is a personal writing practice that is traditionally private -- the pages are a safe space for the writer to vent without fear of judgment. There is no “right” way to journal; depending on your goals and what you want to achieve, journaling can take all sorts of forms, from personal observation to lists to ...
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Huffington Post article
Looking for a good book? What I read and loved in 2015
Huffington Post - about 1 year
If you have read my articles for a while, you will know I love a good book. Ok, let's get real - I am completely obsessed with books. I have thousands of them in my house, piled up on every available surface. I buy them even when I know I won't get to read them for months. I even have more than a few that have been on my shelf for a year or longer, unread (but waiting for me patiently, as books do). It's a love affair really. Being a strategist, writer, and a PhD researcher, I have a licence to buy as many books as I need. Or want. Or just have to have. As far as addictions go, it's the healthiest one I've ever had. I get asked constantly what I'm reading, what I've just read, and what's next on my list. So here is some holiday reading inspiration for you. I hope one of the books on this list may feed your soul and fill your cup over a relaxing break (or give you some respite from your crazy relatives!). Enjoy. 13 favourites of 2015 The Woman I Wanted To Be, Dianne Von Furst ...
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Huffington Post article
Re-thinking Education: What Are We Teaching?
Huffington Post - about 3 years
"The opposite of war is not peace; it's creation." -- Jonathan Larson, composer and playwright most known for writing the musical Rent Reading the headline news in The Huffington Post recently, I was struck by the marked contrast between two articles: The Impact section featured a story about seven-year-old Zora Ball, the youngest person to create a mobile app, while the front page featured a story about governmental leaders sabotaging peace agreements and maneuvering to instigate war. A child, new to our formal education system, is exercising creative power; while adults, graduates of our most esteemed universities, are exercising destructive power. These articles are but a reminder that even in the best-case scenarios, far from the violence and decay of inner city schools, our education system fails to produce peaceful world citizens. Sadly, even the gold standard for education is based on a paradigm that sabotages both innovation and happiness. "What is school all about? Is i ...
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Huffington Post article
Self Care and Being Creative Part 2
Psych Central - about 3 years
[Continued from Part 1] Musician Henry Rollins commented about being a performer and staying healthy on road tours: “Eating well is becoming easier on the road as more places are health conscious. Gyms are easy to find anywhere there’s electricity and traffic. “Time is the hard part. I do my best and I learned a long time ago that without recuperative sleep, good nutrition and constant exercise, this high stress lifestyle of traveling, etc. quickly takes a toll. I just see it as a very important thing and make sure I get it done.” From my article Taking Care of Your Creative Self. [Henry Rollins is a musician, writer, journalist, publisher, actor, radio host, comedian, and activist (Wikipedia). Read about more multitalented creators like Jessica Lange, Gordon Parks, Julia Cameron, Bryce Dallas Howard, Jamie Lee Curtis, Jane Seymour, Natalie Portman, James Franco, Mayim Bialik, Jeff Bridges, Viggo Mortensen, David Lynch and others in article: Multitalented Creative People - ...
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Psych Central article
Writer Alexandra Franzen Shows Us How to Think Creatively, Express Compassion, and Be Thankful
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Alexandra Franzen is a firecracker. There is no better word to describe this exuberant, enthusiastic, wordsmith, but I'm sure she could think of about five thousand more. That's what makes her work so fascinating -- the passion and excitement she brings to the written word. With Thanksgiving right around the corner, Alexandra has written the perfect book to help us all express our thanks and gratitude. Describe your background and what lead you to a career as a blogger, author and writing teacher. What are some of the significant steps you took to bring you career success? My love affair with language began at age four. With a mug of hot chocolate. One dreamy Southern California morning, my parents took me to the local coffee shop. We walked up to the counter, and they asked what I wanted to drink. Being responsible, health-conscious adults, they were hoping I'd say "a shot of wheatgrass!" or "unsweetened herbal tea, please!" But -- while I couldn't really "read" -- I'd ...
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Huffington Post article
25 Ways To Be More Creative: Inc.
Huffington Post - over 3 years
You might think of creativity as something clever marketers or copywriters whip out when they need to come up with a compelling ad, or a personal trait only certain people, such as successful serial entrepreneurs or brilliant improv actors, naturally possess. But according to Keith Sawyer, research psychologist and author of "Zig Zag: The Surprising Path to Greater Creativity," everyone can be more creative just by taking eight incremental steps, but not necessarily in linear order. His path to creativity is more back and forth, a process in which the steps to greater imagination and originality build on and feed off each other. The book is a gem, chock full of fascinating findings from research studies and a deep well of tactics that will get you thinking differently. In fact, Sawyer advocates what is likely a radical shift in mindset for most people. Coming up with good ideas isn't something we leave until there's a pressing need. Rather, it's is a skill that can be practiced daily ...
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Huffington Post article
Yvonna Russell: My Summer Reads
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Perhaps one of the greatest pleasures of summer is lying on a beach or in the grass reading a good book (Kindle, Nook, Tablet, iPad, whatever) that is neither work-related nor serious, diving into stories, falling in love with new or old characters to the satisfying end. Here's my list of a few books I love and those I hope to read this summer. If you love Downtown Abbey (I'm still in mourning for Lady Sybil) creator Simon Fellow's first novel, Snobs is good fun. I haven't read his first book Past Imperfect"but I have added it to my list. I am a latecomer to the Jo Nesbo fan club but after reading Headhunters, I am a super fan. The Craigslist Murders is wickedly funny as a beautiful interior designer channels her rage for her very wealthy clients. The Insatiable Critic by food critic Gael Greene is a sensual memoir of her journey to food critic and her founding work with City Meals on Wheels. At a cocktail party I asked Gael if a movie was made of her book which ...
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Huffington Post article
One 'Artist's Way' to calm flying fears
CNN- Cafferty File - almost 4 years
Author Julia Cameron is no fan of flying. She routinely travels to teach creativity seminars tied to her well-known book "The Artist's Way," but regular flights seem to amp up her fears. Here's how she copes.
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CNN- Cafferty File article
Rev. Ed Bacon: Foster Creativity In The 'Flow' Of Life
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
There's a man with the wonderfully complicated name of Mihaly Csikszentmihaly who is an expert on "flow" and studies creativity. He explains that creative people have two opposing tendencies: "a great deal of curiosity and openness on the one hand and an almost obsessive perseverance on the other." We see this at play with musicians, writers and visual artists. Those are pursuits for which you have to live with your eyes and ears open -- listening, watching, really paying attention to the nuances of life. But these endeavors can also feel amorphous, sometimes even pointless and undervalued. As the Lebanese-America poet Khalil Gibran said, "Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed." The true artist, the one compelled to keep creating in spite of the obstacles, has what Csikszentmihaly calls "obsessive perseverance. In her book, "The Artist's Way," Julia Cameron says there is a relationship between artistic creativity and a spir ...
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Huffington Post article
Scott Alexander Hess: How To Win A Coveted Spirit Award!
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
OK, when I say "win," I mean "be nominated for," because as Best First Screenplay nominee Jonathan Lisecki puts it, "the nomination is the win!" Wait! Don't roll your eyes! He is being absolutely sincere, and I totally buy it. (Read his off-the-cuff, inspiring interview below and you'll agree). For writer/director Lisecki (who also made the 2012 Out 100 list), the Spirit Award nomination really is a win; his out-of-the-gate feature Gayby catapulted him from relative East-Village-artist obscurity to dancing with the Hollywood big boys in a matter of months. But success didn't come overnight, he points out, and it happened because he was absolutely open to trying everything until something stuck. I relate. For me, acting led to playwriting, which led to screenwriting and finally to becoming a novelist, which is, in the words of the awesome Artists Way guru Julia Cameron, my creative "vein of gold." So what does the ever-feisty (and pretty damn humble) Lisecki mean whe ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Some Ideas to Help Stop Obsessing
Psych Central - over 4 years
For as long as I can remember I’ve struggled with obsessive thoughts, with severe ruminations that can interfere with daily life. My thoughts get stuck on something and like a broken record, repeat a certain fear over and over and over again until I scream out loud, “STOP IT!” The French call Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder “folie de doute,” the doubting disease. That’s what obsessions are — a doubt caught in an endless loop of thoughts. But even those not diagnosed with OCD can struggle with obsessions. In fact, I have yet to meet a depressive who doesn’t ruminate, especially in our age of anxiety. Every day gives sensitive types like myself plenty of material to obsess about. So I’m constantly pulling out the tools that I’ve acquired over time to win against my thoughts, to develop confidence — the antidote for doubt — to take charge of my brain, and to stop obsessing. I hope they work for you too. 1. Name the beast. My first step to tackle obsessions: I identify the though ...
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Psych Central article
Remembering Jack London
Counter Punch - over 4 years
In 1989 I drove from San Francisco to visit the Napa Valley an hour and a half north. On my itinerary was a visit to the Glen Ellen Winery and the nearby Jack London State Park. I was also eager to visit the Jack London Bookstore located in the small town of Glen Ellen a mile or so from the state park. I had recently been on a London reading frenzy, devouring everything from The Call of the Wild and Martin Eden to The Iron Heel and memorable short stories such as “To Build a Fire” and “The Apostate.” I had become fascinated with the writer’s life after reading Clarice Stasz’s American Dreamers (St. Martin’s Press, 1988), a biography of London and his wife, Charmian Kitteridge. At the state park, I toured London’s old ranch; looked at the ruins of Wolf House, the home he was building that mysteriously burned down only days before its completion; and visited the writer’s grave, which was marked only by an unadorned boulder. Later, I drove into Glen Ellen to visit the London bookstore ...
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Counter Punch article
Inspiration for Art and ADHD
Psych Central - over 4 years
I’m reading a book and I’m saying, out loud, “Oh my God!” “Yes!” “Amazing!” And no, it’s not Fifty Shades of Grey that I’m reading. I’m having that orgasmic response to re-reading Julia Cameron’s “The Artist’s Way.” I mentioned her book in my last post. There’s lots of inspiration there for a woman who was diagnosed late in life with ADHD. Perhaps you too might find her tips helpful and motivating. Stopping after a success Artists who have been stymied for whatever reason often take “creative u-turns,” says Cameron. She says we can feign indifference after a success, undermining our achievement and becoming defeatist. It wasn’t long after my ADHD diagnosis that I realized that, over decades of being undiagnosed, I’d developed a defeatist attitude no matter how enthusiastically I began. I realized I’d undermined my own dreams by assuming they wouldn’t work out, no matter what I did. Now, I’m working hard not to downplay or undermine my achievements, but rather to build on t ...
Article Link:
Psych Central article
The ADHD Artist’s Way
Psych Central - over 4 years
Untitled, ©Elaine Doy, 2012 Having just revisited Julia Cameron’s excellent book, The Artist’s Way (I’ve chosen it as my Book-of-the-Month Pick for August), I’ve been thinking a lot about ADHD and creativity lately. This weekend, I attended an art show in the countryside. A number of local artists from seasoned professionals to those at the beginning stages of their careers participated in the weekend’s juried show. I wandered through the room, enjoying the many styles of painting. Each artist was given four panels upon which to display their work. I watched as one patron approached my friend Elaine’s artwork. As he came round a corner, Elaine’s art caught his attention. “Wow,” he said. It could very well be that the “Wow” was because of the incredible diversity displayed in Elaine’s little corner of the exhibit. Every other artist displayed work that was easily identifiable through its consistency, as that artist’s work. You’d think Elaine had invited her cousin, her mom, ...
Article Link:
Psych Central article
Erika Ward: Balancing Time and Money, The Keys to Business Success
Huffington Post - over 4 years
I think I can speak for the majority when I say that starting a new business venture can be both exhilarating and terrifying at the same time. I can also assume the former emotion is greater than the latter or else you would never decide to take the final plunge. I dove head first when I started my design business in 2006. The economy, while on shaky ground, didn't seem to matter much to me. I felt failure was not an option and I planned to fight tooth and nail to make this thing work. Yes, fight was the appropriate verb expressed because I knew the odds were against me and anyone else venturing out as a solopreneur. When I sought business advice from others, the overall responses were about as encouraging as walk to the dentist chair for a root canal. If I needed an excuse to bow out gracefully, I could give you fifty reasons in a moment's notice. But the key piece of advice came to me from my late Grandfather, a licensed architect and real estate investor of thirty plus y ...
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Huffington Post article
'New York, New York' 35th Anniversary: The Movie That Almost Destroyed Martin Scorsese
Moviefone Blog - over 4 years
Nearly every one of the great directors who came of age in the 1970s -- including Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, William Friedkin, Peter Bogdanovich, Michael Cimino -- had his own personal Waterloo. Within five to ten years of their breakouts, they'd each shot a massive flop, an epic where ambition and ego had outraced maturity and restraint. Coppola had "One from the Heart," Spielberg had "1941," Friedkin had "Sorcerer," Bogdanovich had "At Long Last Love," and Cimino (most infamously) had "Heaven's Gate." In Scorsese's case, the iceberg was his lavish musical "New York, New York" (released 35 years ago this week, on June 21, 1977). Its failure not only marred his career, it nearly killed him. The disaster may have begun with Scorsese's stylistic approach to the movie, a clash between incompatible filmmaking modes of the old Hollywood he admired and the new Hollywood he'd helped replace it with. It was exacerbated by his eagerness to embrace chaos throu ...
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Moviefone Blog article
Reclaiming Our Creativity – Part 2
Psych Central - almost 5 years
“I have never been a fan of learning in a classroom. Inside a laboratory or a garage, I always wanted to know more, but never inside a classroom.” Caltech physicist Caolionn O’Connell, PhD. “It is often said that education and training are the keys to the future. They are, but a key can be turned in two directions.” Ken Robinson continues, “Turn it one way and you lock resources away, even from those they belong to. Turn it the other way and you release resources and give people back to themselves. “To realize our true creative potential—in our organizations, in our schools and in our communities—we need to think differently about ourselves and to act differently towards each other. We must learn to be creative.” [From his book "Out of Our Minds."] Multitalented boundary crossers In Part 1 of this post, I presented some ideas on how we can learn to be more creative, based on the excellent post “Be More Creative Today – Five ways to sustain creativity at home and school ...
Article Link:
Psych Central article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Julia Cameron
    FIFTIES
  • 2008
    Age 59
    In 2008 she taught a class at the New York Open Center, The Right to Write, named and modeled after one of her bestselling books, which reveals the importance of writing.
    More Details Hide Details Cameron has lived in Los Angeles, Chicago, Taos, and Washington D.C., but now lives in New York City.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1978
    Age 29
    In 1978, reaching a point in her life when writing and drinking could no longer coexist, Cameron stopped the drugs and alcohol, and began teaching creative unblocking, which propelled her to fame after she published the book based on her teachings, The Artist's Way.
    More Details Hide Details She states creativity is an authentic spiritual path. Cameron has taught filmmaking, creative unblocking, and writing. She has taught at The Smithsonian, Esalen, the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies, and the New York Open Center. At Northwestern University, she was writer in residence for film.
  • 1976
    Age 27
    They have one daughter, Domenica Cameron-Scorsese, born in 1976.
    More Details Hide Details Cameron and Scorsese collaborated on three films. Cameron's film, God's Will, is based on the Cameron-Scorsese marriage and divorce, portraying a divorced, self-centered show business couple who die unexpectedly and end up fighting in heaven over what will happen to their daughter. A review of Cameron's memoir Floor Sample states that Cameron "reveals the dark side of her privileged life: her descent into alcoholic blackouts and drug-induced paranoia as well as descriptions of her bouts with psychosis."
  • 1975
    Age 26
    She met Martin Scorsese when interviewing him for Rolling Stone. They married in 1975 and divorced in 1977; Cameron was Scorsese's second wife.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1948
    Born
    Born on March 4, 1948.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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