Kimberly Peirce
American film director
Kimberly Peirce
Kimberly Peirce is an American feature film director, notable for her debut feature film, Boys Don't Cry (1999). Her second feature, Stop-Loss, was released by Paramount Pictures in 2008.
Biography
Kimberly Peirce's personal information overview.
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Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Kimberly Peirce
News
News abour Kimberly Peirce from around the web
My Week With 'Carol,' The Year's Most Enchanting Movie
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The final installment of the "Hunger Games" franchise is opening in some 4,000 theaters this weekend. The Seth Rogen Christmas comedy "The Night Before" bows in nearly 3,000, and "Secret in Their Eyes" -- a thriller that finds Julia Roberts and Nicole Kidman sharing the screen for the first time -- is slated for a reported 2,400 auditoriums. But I would turn my back on all of them in favor of a comparatively tiny film whose quality can run circles around the others.* The movie I prioritized this week is "Carol," the latest from gifted director Todd Haynes, who made two of the 2000s' best releases with "Far From Heaven" and "I'm Not There." Having first seen "Carol" back in September, four months after its euphoric Cannes Film Festival premiere, I cleared my schedule for a weeklong "Carol" blitz, and I've come away with an even fonder appreciation of the film. Technically, this blitz started last month during a quick conversation with Cate Blanchett, who was promoting "Truth," the ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
My Week With 'Carol,' The Year's Most Enchanting Movie
Huffington Post - over 1 year
The final installment of the "Hunger Games" franchise is opening in some 4,000 theaters this weekend. The Seth Rogen Christmas comedy "The Night Before" bows in nearly 3,000, and "Secret in Their Eyes" -- a thriller that finds Julia Roberts and Nicole Kidman sharing the screen for the first time -- is slated for a reported 2,400 auditoriums. But I would turn my back on all of them in favor of a comparatively tiny film whose quality can run circles around the others.* The movie I prioritized this week is "Carol," the latest from gifted director Todd Haynes, who made two of the 2000s' best releases with "Far From Heaven" and "I'm Not There." Having first seen "Carol" back in September, four months after its euphoric Cannes Film Festival premiere, I cleared my schedule for a weeklong "Carol" blitz, and I've come away with an even fonder appreciation of the film. Technically, this blitz started last month during a quick conversation with Cate Blanchett, who was promoting "Truth," the ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Horror cinema: A valentine to genre favorites from two admirers
LATimes - about 3 years
#photogallery-wrapper{width:100%;background:#000;min-height:450px;} #photogallery{background:#000;width:600px;margin:0px auto;min-height:450px;} .photogalleryloader{} #photogallery div.galleryitem{width:100%;margin:0 0 30px;} #photogallery div.galleryitem p{text-align:left;margin:5px 0px;padding:0 10px;} #photogallery div.galleryitem p.galleryCaption{padding-top:5px;border-top:1px #333 solid;} #photogallery div.galleryitem img{margin:0 auto;border:none;} #photogallery .galleryCredit{letter-spacing:1px;font-size:.75em;text-transform:uppercase;} Horror hall of fame Two Hero Complex horror fans dig through basement and attic for their favorite fear-inducing films. Click through the gallery for Gina McIntyre and Mark Olsen's five top horror flicks. (Picturehouse; Rosebud Releasing; Universal) http://herocomplex.latimes.com/movies/horror-cinema-a-valentine-to-genre-favorites-from-two-admirers/attachment/horrorhalloffame/ 1 Link 'Night of the Living Dea ...
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LATimes article
The Blood of Carrie: A Feminist Review of the Re-Make
Huffington Post - over 3 years
"Carrie is largely about how women find their own channels of power, but also what men fear about women and women's sexuality. Writing the book in 1973 and only three years out of college, I was fully aware of what Women's Liberation implied for me and others of my sex. Carrie is woman feeling her powers for the first time and, like Samson, pulling down the temple on everyone in sight at the end of the book." - Stephen King, Danse Macabre Most feminist criticism of Stephen King's Carrie has focused on the male fear of powerful women that the author said inspired the film, with the anti-Carrie camp finding her death at the end to signify the defeat of the "monstrous feminine" and therefore a triumph of sexism. But Stephen King's honesty about what inspired his 1973 book notwithstanding, Carrie is as much an articulation of a feminist nightmare as it is of a patriarchal one, with neither party coming out on top. The rise of Second Wave feminism in the '70s posed serious threat ...
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Huffington Post article
Cinefantastique Spotlight Podcast: <em>Carrie</em>
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Poor, unfortunate 2013 Carrie. Under other circumstances, we'd be able to look kindly on this new adaptation of the Stephen King novel, celebrating it as a wholly serviceable, decently scary entry for an author who hasn't frequently enough been dealt a fair hand when his works have been brought to the screen. Only one, little thing stands in the way: 1976 Carrie, Brian De Palma's masterful adaptation that managed to rewrite the rules of horror film and scare the crap out of audiences who could hardly believe what hit 'em. Placed against that cinema classic, this new version, directed by Kimberly Peirce and starring Chloë Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore, begins to look a lot like its title character: a little wan, rather awkward, and certainly not the type you'd willingly ask to the prom. Cinefantastique Online's Steve Biodrowski, Lawrence French, and Dan Persons get together to analyze the monumental challenge director Peirce faced in re-envisioning the original, and whether her more ...
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Huffington Post article
'Carrie' remake director Kimberly Peirce talks horror, Hollywood
LATimes - over 3 years
Article Link:
LATimes article
Interview: Director Kimberly Peirce on Remaking <i>Carrie</i>
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Writer-director Kimberly Peirce burst onto the film scene in 1999 with the gut-wrenching docudrama Boys Don't Cry, which also netted star Hilary Swank the first of her two Academy Awards. For her latest directorial effort, Peirce has entered genre territory by tackling MGM's new adaptation of Carrie, the seminal Stephen King novel that was first brought to the screen in 1976 by director Brian De Palma (and which has been remade and sequelized a few times since). For Peirce, the decision to mount a new remake such an iconic film (with Chloë Grace Moretz stepping into Sissy Spacek's shoes as the troubled teen with the TK) came not from a desire to step over De Palma, but rather to pay homage to King's prose. As she explains in our lengthy chat, she put a lot of thought and effort into making her version of Carrie (which also stars Julianne Moore) stand out and stand apart. Check out the transcript below (but be aware that there may be some spoilers about the film's climax, so tread ligh ...
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Huffington Post article
'Carrie' remake is gorier, but not better, than original - USA TODAY
Google News - over 3 years
New York Times 'Carrie' remake is gorier, but not better, than original USA TODAY Rather than offering new blood, Carrie is a purely cosmetic revamp. There's nothing inventive in the retelling of this American horror story based on Stephen King's best-selling 1974 novel. If director Kimberly Peirce had brought a measure of the intriguing ... Review: 'Carrie' hasn't evolved much since 1976Los Angeles Times 'Carrie' Returns, With Julianne Moore and Chloë Grace MoretzNew York Times Carrie 2013 pales in comparison to 1976 original: reviewToronto Star Philly.com -Newsday -Minneapolis Star Tribune all 208 news articles »
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Google News article
Movie Preview: Carrie
Entertainment Weekly - over 3 years
By Keith Staskiewicz In the upcoming remake from Boys Don't Cry director Kimberly Peirce, Carrie is played by 16-year-old Chloë Grace Moretz
Article Link:
Entertainment Weekly article
Movie Preview: Carrie
Entertainment Weekly - over 3 years
By Keith Staskiewicz In the upcoming remake from Boys Don't Cry director Kimberly Peirce, Carrie is played by 16-year-old Chloë Grace Moretz
Article Link:
Entertainment Weekly article
‘Carrie’ Is Back. So Is Kimberly Peirce.
NYTimes - over 3 years
The director of “Boys Don’t Cry” on the career she’s had and the one that might have been.     
Article Link:
NYTimes article
‘Carrie’ Is Back. So Is Kimberly Peirce.
NYTimes - over 3 years
The director of “Boys Don’t Cry” on the career she’s had and the one that might have been.     
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Student Academy Award Winners Announced
Huffington Post - over 3 years
The world's future filmmakers got a preview of the kind of Hollywood glamour and glory that could be theirs someday as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented its 40th annual Student Academy Awards. Sixteen college students from around the globe were honored at the Saturday night ceremony, held at the academy's Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills and hosted by onetime Student Academy Award winner Bob Saget. Presenters included writer-director Kimberly Peirce and actors Clark Gregg, Jason Schwartzman and Quvenzhane (kwuh-VEHN'-juh-nay) Wallis. This year's student honors included two each from the University of Southern California, Ringling College of Art and Design in Florida and the School of Visual Arts in New York. Past Student Academy Award winners have gone on to receive eight Oscars and 46 Oscar nominations. Could Saturday night's winners be far behind? Remember these names: GOLD MEDAL WINNERS _ Brian Schwarz, University of Texa ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Kimberly Peirce
    FORTIES
  • 2013
    Age 45
    Her most recent feature film, Carrie, was released on October 18, 2013.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2011
    Age 43
    On February 16, 2011 it was announced that Peirce will direct the crime thriller The Knife, about two men from opposite sides of the law who must overcome their mistrust of one another and risk their lives in order to infiltrate the organization of a ruthless gang leader threatening to spread armed violence across Los Angeles and the urban centers of America.
    More Details Hide Details Peirce is in negotiations to direct and executive produce a limited series for USA Network written by Andre Jacquemetton and Maria Jacquemetton (Mad Men). Peirce co-wrote the script for Silent Star, a murder mystery about the 1922 death of Hollywood director William Desmond Taylor and the scandals that nearly destroyed the film industry. However, the project stalled. Peirce is currently working on a sex comedy "with a gender twist" for producer Judd Apatow and Universal Studios. Peirce is openly lesbian.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2005
    Age 37
    In 2005, inspired by the real-life stories of American soldiers, including her own brother, fighting in Iraq and coming home, Peirce began work on Stop-Loss.
    More Details Hide Details Peirce traveled the country interviewing soldiers about their experiences and worked with novelist and screenwriter Mark Richard to turn the research into a screenplay. Released in 2008, Stop-Loss received positive reviews from critics. Peirce was honored with the Hamilton Behind the Camera True-Grit Directing Award as well as the Andrew Sarris Directing Awards for the film. In association with the film, Peirce created a website called SoundOff and gave soldiers and their families cameras to record and share their stories and opinions. Shortly after the film's release, Peirce spoke before the National Press Club and members of Congress on behalf of Soldiers and the Stop-Loss Compensation Act, which financially compensated soldiers for multiple tours of duty served because of the stop-loss policy. The measure subsequently passed. Much of the inspiration for her two films was said to come from her love of The Godfather:
  • TWENTIES
  • 1997
    Age 29
    With help from the Sundance Institute's Filmmakers, Writers and Producers Labs in 1997, Peirce completed the feature film in 1999.
    More Details Hide Details Upon its release, Boys Don't Cry became one of the most acclaimed and talked about films of the year, opening at the Venice, Toronto and New York Film Festivals and earning many honors, including the Best Actress Oscar, Golden Globe, Independent Spirit award and many other awards for the film's star, Hilary Swank. Chloë Sevigny was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar and Golden Globe and won the Independent Spirit Award and many other awards for her role as Lana Tisdale. The film received the International Critics prize for Best Film at both the London and Stockholm Film Festivals, the Satyajit Ray Foundation Award for Best First Feature at the London Film Festival, and was named "Best American Feature," by Janet Maslin. Peirce won honors as Best Debut Director from the National Board of Review and Best New Filmmaker from the Boston Society of Film Critics.
  • 1995
    Age 27
    The subsequent film short she made for her thesis in 1995 was nominated by Columbia faculty for a Princess Grace Award, and received an Astrea Production Grant.
    More Details Hide Details After film producer Christine Vachon saw a version of the short, Vachon and Peirce began working on a feature film. In order to fund the writing and development of the feature, Peirce worked as a paralegal on the midnight shift, as a 35mm film projectionist, and received a New York Foundation for the Arts grant.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1967
    Born
    Peirce was born on September 8, 1967, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to Sherry and Robert A. Peirce (originally Materazzi), who owned a construction company.
    More Details Hide Details When Peirce was three, she moved to New York City, and at age eleven she moved to Miami, Florida where she eventually graduated from Miami Sunset Senior High School. While attending the University of Chicago, Peirce moved to Kobe, Japan for two years to work as a photographer and teach English, and then to New York City to work as a photography intern for Time magazine under photojournalist Alfred Eisenstaedt. She then returned to the University of Chicago to graduate with a degree in English and Japanese Literature. Peirce then enrolled at Columbia University, to pursue an MFA in film. While at Columbia, Peirce completed The Last Good Breath, an experimental short film about two star-crossed lovers caught amidst a world war in which one lover always lives and the other always dies. The short screened as part of the Leopards of Tomorrow program at the Locarno International Film Festival.
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