Ko Young-hee
Consort of Kim Jong-il
Ko Young-hee
Ko Young-hee, also known as Ko Yong-hui, was the North Korean supreme leader Kim Jong-il's consort and mother of North Korea's Supreme Commander, Kim Jong-un. Within North Korea she is known as "The Respected Mother who is the Most Faithful and Loyal 'Subject' to the Dear Leader Comrade Supreme Commander", "The Mother of Pyongyang", and "The Mother of Great Songun Korea.".
Biography
Ko Young-hee's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Ko Young-hee from around the web
'Giải mật' cuộc sống đầy bí ẩn của gia đình Kim Jong-il - VTC
Google News - over 5 years
Sau Song Hye-rim, bà Ko Young-hee xuất thân trong gia đình Triều Tiên sống tại Nhật Bản trở thành phu nhân của Tổng Bí thư Kim Jong-il. Cha của Ko Young-hee sinh ra tại đảo Jeju, sau sống tại Nhật Bản, hơn nữa trở thành tuyển thủ Jodo nổi tiếng tại
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Google News article
Ko Young Hee Image Uncovered - Daily NK
Google News - over 5 years
The Daily NK has uncovered images showing a young Ko Young Hee, mother of three of Kim Jong Il¡¯s children including successor Kim Jong Eun, during a Mansudae Art Troupe tour of Japan in the early 1970s
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Google News article
North Korean dictator executed a woman after she rejected his advance - IBTimes Hong Kong
Google News - almost 6 years
Second mistress Ko Young-hee was a Japanese-born ethnic Korean and a dancer. She was First Lady until her death - reportedly of cancer - in 2004. They had two sons, Kim Jong-chul and Kim Jong-un. Jong-un was hand-picked by his father among the sons to
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Google News article
The Legend of Kim Jong-un - Asia Sentinel (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
One undisputed fact is that his mother, Ko Young-hee, was a dancer in the Mansudae Art Troupe, with whom Kim Jong-il was smitten and whom he married. She died of cancer in 2004 at the relatively young age of 51. All of this is probably to the good,
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Google News article
North Korea Reports Death of Official Who Was Guiding Dynastic Power Transfer
NYTimes - over 6 years
SEOUL, South Korea -- A top North Korean official believed to be working to secure an eventual transfer of power from Kim Jong-il, the ailing North Korean leader, to one of his sons died last week, but analysts say they do not think it will impede the succession process. The analysts said that the death of the official, Ri Je-gang, coming soon
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NYTimes article
Cryptic Man, Known Only by One Photo and Anecdotes, May Lead North Korea
NYTimes - over 7 years
There is only one photograph available outside North Korea thought to be that of the man South Korean officials believe will inherit the world's most unpredictable regime, one that is armed with nuclear weapons. In that picture, the man, Kim Jong-un, a son of the ailing North Korean leader, Kim Jong-il, is an 11-year-old. ''When Prince Jong-un
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NYTimes article
Analysts Try To Envision North Korea In Transition
NYTimes - over 8 years
American and South Korean intelligence reports that the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-il, suffered a stroke raise questions that the North's neighbors have long feared asking. If Mr. Kim dies or is incapacitated, who is going to take over the world's most isolated and unpredictable regime, now armed with nuclear weapons? And what will happen to a
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NYTimes article
The Last Emperor
NYTimes - over 13 years
The Dear Leader is a workaholic. Kim Jong Il sleeps four hours a night, or if he works through the night, as he sometimes does, he sleeps four hours a day. His office is a hive of activity; reports cross his desk at all hours. Dressed as always in his signature khaki jumpsuit, he reads them all, issuing instructions to aides, dashing off
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ko Young-hee
    FIFTIES
  • 2004
    Age 50
    On 27 August 2004, various sources reported that she had died in Paris, probably of breast cancer.
    More Details Hide Details Under North Korea's songbun ascribed status system, Ko's Korean-Japanese heritage would make her part of the lowest "hostile" class. Furthermore, her grandfather worked in a sewing factory for the Imperial Japanese Army, which would give her the "lowest imaginable status qualities" for a North Korean. Prior to an internal propaganda film released after ascension of Kim Jong-un, there were three attempts made to idolize Ko, in a style similar to that associated with Kang Pan-sŏk, mother of Kim Il-sung, and Kim Jong-suk, mother of Kim Jong-il and the first wife of Kim Il-sung. These previous attempts at idolization had failed, and they were stopped after Kim Jong-il's 2008 stroke. The building of a cult of personality around Ko encounters the problem of her bad songbun, even though it is usually passed on by the father. Making her identity public would undermine the Kim dynasty's pure bloodline, and after Kim Jong-il's death, her personal information, including name, became state secrets. Ko's real name or other personal details have not been publicly revealed in North Korea, and she is referred to as "Mother of Great Songun Korea" or "Great Mother". The most recent propaganda film called its main character "Lee Eun-mi".
  • TWENTIES
  • 1981
    Age 27
    In 1981 Ko gave birth to son Kim Jong-chul, her first child with Kim Jong-il.
    More Details Hide Details It was Kim's third child, after son Kim Jong-nam (b. 1971 to Song Hye-rim), and daughter Kim Sul-song (b. 1974 to Kim Young-sook). Kim Jong-il's second child with Ko, present North Korean supreme leader Kim Jong-un, followed between one to three years later after Jong-chul. Their third child, Kim Yo-jong, a daughter, was believed to be about 23 in 2012.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1961
    Age 7
    Ko was born in Ikuno, Osaka, Japan to parents of Korean descent.At the age of 8, her family moved to North Korea in May 1961.
    More Details Hide Details In the early 1970s, she began to work as a dancer for the Mansudae Art Troupe in Pyongyang.
  • 1953
    Born
    Born on June 16, 1953.
    More Details Hide Details
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