Lance Rentzel
American football player
Lance Rentzel
Thomas Lance Rentzel is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and the Los Angeles Rams from 1965 to 1974.
Biography
Lance Rentzel's personal information overview.
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Relationships
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News
News abour Lance Rentzel from around the web
Heroes of Pro Football's Past, Not Forgotten - DigitalJournal.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Focusing on legends like Roman Gabriel, Bob Hayes, Homer Jones, Don Meredith, Lance Rentzel, and Otis Taylor- many of whom are Jones' good friends - Distant Memories provides personal stories and insights of the great men who played football
Article Link:
Google News article
Early football practices have progressed - Enid News & Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
Lance Rentzel, who played at Oklahoma from 1961-64 under the legendary Bud Wilkinson, wrote in his autobiography the Sooners went without water in preseason practice. One player became crazy and started to attack Wilkinson during a preseason practice,
Article Link:
Google News article
'Don Knotts: Tied Up With Laughter:' MPI releases new DVD of rare comedy skits - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
... and former Dallas Cowboys player Lance Rentzel (Heatherton's husband at the time). Some of the best moments arrive when Knotts sings with Jimmy Durante in a memorable scene and later when he performs his legendary “nervous man” skit
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Google News article
Top 10: Memorable Weather Games - DallasCowboys.com
Google News - over 5 years
The 1967 NFL Championship, dubbed "The Ice Bowl," was the most severe weather game in NFL history and the coldest Cowboys contest ever: minus-13 degrees at kickoff at Lambeau Field, with a wind chill close to minus-50. Lance Rentzel's 50-yard touchdown
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Google News article
PRO FOOTBALL; Remembering Landry, the Thinker and Motivator
NYTimes - about 17 years
He became famous for his appearance -- the sideline stoicism, the courtly attire, self-restraint in the midst of a brutal sport and, of course, his hat. But to his players, to his colleagues in National Football League and to the state of Texas, Tom Landry, the longtime Dallas Cowboys coach, represented much more. He was a father figure, a football
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NYTimes article
Backtalk; Violence, Redemption and the Cost of Sports
NYTimes - over 19 years
The trial balloon with Marv Albert's toupee on top has long since returned to ground. The broadcaster politely declined even discussing an offered radio job until after his sentencing this week and then presumably more time for jail or psychological counseling. But the brief flurry 10 days ago accomplished the mission of preparing us for his
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NYTimes article
New Orleans: Just Bourbon And Oddness
NYTimes - about 20 years
WHEN the Super Bowl is in New Orleans, beware. Strange things happen. Richard Nixon took a winning quarterback out of the shadow of a doubt, but the President's suggested ''down-and-in'' pass two years later didn't work. Fred Dryer and Lance Rentzel, disguised as reporters for a magazine, tried to ''spread as much hearsay and innuendo'' as they
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NYTimes article
PERSPECTIVE PRO FOOTBALL;The Boys Of Winter
NYTimes - about 21 years
When the wake-up call rang in the hotel room of Bob Hayes, world-class sprinter and wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys, the operator said in a pleasant tone, "Good morning, it's 7:30 and 19 degrees below zero." Hayes whistled softly and said, "Man, I can't handle that." It was New Year's Eve in 1967, and the Cowboys awoke to arctic cold in Green
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NYTimes article
PRO FOOTBALL; Exotica From Reeves Is Trickery for Others
NYTimes - over 22 years
When Dan Reeves reaches into his bag of tricks . . . oh, that's right, he doesn't like the phrase "trick plays." "I think 'exotic plays' is a better word for them," he says. Trick plays. Exotic plays. Actually, they should be called killer plays, because that's what they have done to other teams. Reeves uses trick plays to jump-start his own team
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NYTimes article
Sports of The Times; Meggett Improves On Reeves's Option
NYTimes - over 23 years
THE Giants had jumped to a quick 13-0 lead and now they suddenly had the ball again at the Redskin 42-yard line. Linebacker Carlton Bailey had forced Richard Brooks's fumble that safety Greg Jackon recovered. In the huddle, Phil Simms called the option pass-run for David Meggett. As the huddle broke, Simms turned to Meggett and said, "Just be
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NYTimes article
Delos Wilson Rentzel Dies at 81; Helped Develop Airline Industry
NYTimes - over 25 years
Delos Wilson Rentzel, a leader in the development of American aviation as a Federal official and an airline executive, died Friday at St. Anthony's Hospital in Oklahoma City. He was 81 years old. His death was caused by pneumonia and complications of a stroke, his family said. Mr. Rentzel served four years under President Harry S. Truman, who
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NYTimes article
CONVENTION IN DALLAS: THE REPUBLICANS; COMPUTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO G.O.P. QUESTIONED
NYTimes - over 32 years
Several computer companies contributed a total of more than $2 million in equipment and services to the Republican National Convention, in exchange for being designated the ''official providers'' of convention computers. Now questions have been raised about the transactions, and a Federal Election Commission aide said they could violate Federal
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NYTimes article
G.O.P. CONVENTION PLANS WIDER COMPUTER USE
NYTimes - over 33 years
Republicans are preparing to nudge their national political convention into the computer age in 1984. Party leaders plan to use dozens of computer terminals to do anything from processing tickets and transportation requests to keeping track of vote tallies on developing platform issues at the national convention in Dallas. Frank Fahrenkopf Jr.,
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NYTimes article
COWBOYS UNSETTLED BY COCAINE INQUIRIES
NYTimes - over 33 years
Players and former players involved with illegal drugs are hardly something new to the Dallas Cowboys. In 1972, before what would have been his third season at Dallas, Duane Thomas pleaded guilty of marijuana possession and was given a five-year probated sentence; three months later he was traded to the San Diego Chargers. In 1973, Lance Rentzel, a
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NYTimes article
SPORTS AND THE CURSE OF VIOLENCE
NYTimes - over 35 years
MY son is a 17-year-old who loves sports - basketball in particular. He could be described by that much abused cliche, ''typical teen-ager.'' Yet, I'm worried about this ''typical teenager'' because I see evidence that the overwhelming aura of violence associated with sports is beginning to leave a dark imprint on his basic beliefs regarding the
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lance Rentzel
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2007
    Age 63
    He played sparingly as a backup running back due to recurring injuries and his contributions came mainly as a kickoff returner during his first two seasons. He set the record for the longest kickoff return (101 yards) in franchise history as a rookie, which was broken by Aundrae Allison's 104-yarder in 2007.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1975
    Age 31
    On August 27, 1975, he was placed on waivers, effectively ending his career.
    More Details Hide Details After playing in nine NFL seasons, he had accumulated 4,826 yards receiving, 196 yards rushing, and 1,000 yards returning punts and kickoffs. He also had a perfect passer rating by completing his lone pass attempt for a 58-yard touchdown.
    Rentzel was one of three men credited with inspiring the eccentricities that surround Media Day at the Super Bowl. In January 1975, SPORT Magazine editor Dick Schaap hired Rentzel and teammate Fred Dryer to cover Super Bowl IX.
    More Details Hide Details Donning costumes inspired by The Front Page, "Cubby O'Switzer" (Rentzel) and "Scoops Brannigan" (Dryer) peppered players and coaches from both the Minnesota Vikings and Pittsburgh Steelers with questions that ranged from the clichéd to the downright absurd. Rentzel humorously explained, "We're here to ask the dumbest questions we can and to mooch as much food and beer as we possibly can."
  • 1974
    Age 30
    He was reinstated in 1974 after a ten-month suspension.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1973
    Age 29
    In 1973, while on probation for the indecent exposure charge, Rentzel was suspended indefinitely by the National Football League at the start of the 1973 season for conduct detrimental to the league after being convicted for possession of marijuana.
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  • 1972
    Age 28
    In October 1972, he was the subject of a lengthy feature article in SPORT Magazine written by Gary Cartwright.
    More Details Hide Details Also that year, Rentzel wrote When All the Laughter Died in Sorrow, about his professional football experiences and personal life.
  • 1971
    Age 27
    Rentzel led the Los Angeles Rams in receptions (38) in 1971, but was never able to regain his previous level of play.
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    On May 19, 1971, he was traded to the Los Angeles Rams, in exchange for tight end Billy Truax and wide receiver Wendell Tucker.
    More Details Hide Details Head coach Tom Landry said after the trade, "We know we are giving up on one of the top flankers in the league, but I thought he would be better off in another city where he had the same opportunity regularly. We found this in Los Angeles, and it was one of the teams Lance wanted to be traded to if he were traded". To replace him, the Cowboys also obtained Lance Alworth from the San Diego Chargers, in exchange for the left tackle Tony Liscio, the tight end Pettis Norman, and the defensive tackle Ron East. Although he spent only four seasons with the Cowboys, Rentzel left as the team's fourth all-time wide receiver in addition to other franchise records:
  • 1970
    Age 26
    Rentzel asked the Cowboys to place him on the inactive list so he could devote his time to settling his personal affairs. He would miss the last three games of the 1970 regular season, including the Cowboys' playoff drive to its narrow Super Bowl V loss to the Baltimore Colts.
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    He was leading the team in receiving yards in 1970, when he was arrested for exposing himself to a ten-year-old girl.
    More Details Hide Details At the time the accusation was made, the press revealed a nearly forgotten incident that happened when as a Minnesota Viking in September 1966, he was charged with exposing himself to two young girls in St. Paul, and pleaded guilty to the reduced charge of disorderly conduct. He was not sentenced to jail, but merely ordered to seek psychiatric care. Because of the nationwide reaction and publicity from the scandal, his wife, the singer and actress Joey Heatherton, divorced him shortly thereafter.
  • 1969
    Age 25
    In April 1969, Rentzel married Joey Heatherton, an actor, dancer, and singer, in New York City. In November 1970, Rentzel was arrested for exposing himself to a 10-year-old girl. He pleaded guilty to the charge and promised to undergo psychiatric treatment. Rentzel was given a suspended sentence. Heatherton filed for divorce in September 1971.
    More Details Hide Details It became final the following year.
    In 1969, he had a career-high 12 touchdown receptions and tied with Tom Matte as the league's touchdown leader (13).
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  • 1968
    Age 24
    His best season came in 1968, when he posted 54 receptions for 1,009 yards.
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  • 1967
    Age 23
    He spent his prime seasons with the Cowboys, where he formed the best NFL wide receiver duo with future Hall of Famer Bob Hayes. He starred in the 1967 NFL Championship, known since as the "Ice Bowl," scoring a fourth quarter, go-ahead touchdown later negated by the Packers' game-clinching drive.
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    The Dallas Cowboys converted him into a flanker, where he became not only an immediate starter but also one of the best wideouts in the league, while leading the team in receptions from 1967 through 1969 and in receiving yards from 1968 through 1969.
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    On May 2, 1967, he was traded to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for a third-round draft choice (#76-Mike McGill).
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  • 1965
    Age 21
    He was also selected in the sixth round (48th overall) of the 1965 AFL Draft by the Buffalo Bills.
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    Rentzel was selected by the Minnesota Vikings in the second round (23rd overall) of the 1965 NFL draft.
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    He was one of four Sooners players who missed the 1965 Gator Bowl game against Florida State University.
    More Details Hide Details Rentzel, offensive lineman Ralph Neely, Jim Grisham and Wes Skidgel had signed with professional teams before the game and were ruled ineligible for the contest, which Florida State University won 36–19 on the strength of four touchdown catches by Fred Biletnikoff.
  • 1964
    Age 20
    During his senior year in 1964, he was named to the All-Big Eight team.
    More Details Hide Details That year he was Oklahoma's top pass catcher and punter. In the Big Eight Conference his 5.4 rushing average was second only to Gale Sayers. He was also the conference's No. 3 pass receiver, as well as No. 2 punter with a 40.5-yard average.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1962
    Age 18
    Rentzel played college football at the University of Oklahoma under famous coach Bud Wilkinson, where he starred as a versatile all-around halfback from 1962 to 1964.
    More Details Hide Details At Oklahoma, he was known for his open field speed and propensity for big plays rushing, receiving passes and returning kicks.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1943
    Born
    Born on October 14, 1943.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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