Lang Hancock
Australian businessman
Lang Hancock
Langley Frederick George "Lang" Hancock was an Australian iron ore magnate from Western Australia who maintained a high profile in the competing spheres of business and politics. Famous initially for discovering the world's largest iron ore deposit in 1952 and becoming one of the richest men in Australia, he is now perhaps best remembered for his marriage to the controversial and much younger former maid Rose Porteous.
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Lang Hancock's personal information overview.
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The China-fuelled resources boom is at risk - Financial Times
Google News - over 5 years
Dubbed the iron lady of the Pilbara – the desolate northern iron ore region of Western Australia – Ms Rinehart has worked hard to rejuvenate the debt-laden mining business left to her two decades ago by her father Lang Hancock
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Rinehart's riches - Khaleej Times
Google News - over 5 years
... Gina Rinehart is no ordinary woman and, going by the way she has steered her family's mining business, she seems to have taken the comment by her father, legendary Australian mining magnate Lang Hancock, as constructive criticism
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Medical Australia gains billionaire Lang Walker as shareholder - Proactive Investors USA & Canada
Google News - over 5 years
Medical Australia (ASX: MLA) has gained billionaire Lang Hancock's Auckland Trust Company as a 2.4% shareholder via a shortfall of 10871698 options taken up by the trust. Recently, Medical Australia has undergone a transformation under managing
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Buffett recalls battles of the past - Omaha World-Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Buffett and fellow billionaires Bill Gates and Carlos Slim Helú might be passed up on the wealth scale by Gina Rinehart, an Australian who inherited Hancock Prospecting from her father, Lang Hancock, Forbes magazine reported
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Australia's richest woman fumes over carbon tax - Perth Now
Google News - over 5 years
In a rare interview, the chairwoman of Hancock Prospecting and daughter of mining pioneer Lang Hancock, told The Sunday Times the Government's new taxes were a "shock to investment". And she claimed bureaucracy would be the only "growth industry in
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Rinehart ready to rock Gillard's boat - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
At 10 she was driving utes through the West Australian outback with her dad, pioneering mining magnate Lang Hancock. Lang was no sissy either. He wanted to use nuclear bombs to blast mines into the remote, red Pilbara, where in the 1950s he'd stumbled
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UNDA defends intellectual freedom over Monckton - TheRecord.com.au
Google News - over 5 years
When the late mining magnate Lang Hancock's daughter Gina Rinehart - who has sponsored the Lang Hancock Lecture series – asked Prof Hammond to host Lord Monckton, UNDA also planned to host a prominent Australian speaker who opposes Lord Monckton's
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Gina defends mine empire inheritance - Central Queensland news
Google News - over 5 years
The blue-blooded daughter of West Australian pioneer Lang Hancock, touted to take the mantle of the world's richest person in coming years, spent Sunday at her Alpha Coal Project trial mine site feasting and feting VIPs from China, India, France,
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Monckton channels Hancock in speech to the climate change sceptic faithful - WA today
Google News - over 5 years
Controversial climate change "sceptic" Lord Christopher Monckton has compared himself to WA iron ore pioneer Lang Hancock in deflecting the public criticism that has dogged his Australian speaking tour. Speaking at Notre Dame University in Fremantle
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Australia's big dig for foreign workers - Peninsula On-line
Google News - over 5 years
Rinehart is chairman of Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd and daughter of the firm's late founder, Lang Hancock, who pioneered the country's iron ore industry in the 1950s and '60s after discovering a mother lode in the rust-red landscape of the northwest
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Mining boom boosts Australia's ultra-wealthy - World Socialist Web Site
Google News - over 5 years
Western Australia-based Rinehart inherited her father Lang Hancock's in-perpetuity royalties to iron ore in the Pilbara region now mined by Rio Tinto. She more than doubled her wealth in the past 12 months, with her value estimated at $4.75 billion in
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Special report: Australia's big dig for foreign workers - Reuters UK
Google News - over 5 years
Rinehart is chairman of Hancock Prospecting Pty Ltd and daughter of the firm's late founder, Lang Hancock, who pioneered the country's iron ore industry in the 1950s and '60s after discovering a mother lode in the rust-red landscape of the northwest
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Maths camp adds up for students - Pilbara Echo
Google News - over 5 years
St Lukes College students have taken part in the three-day Lang Hancock Norwest Maths Games Camp. Games Camp convenor Jane Forte said the St Luke's students were part of an “enthusiastic” group of 40 students from three schools
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The growing empire of our wealth queen - SmartCompany.com.au
Google News - over 5 years
The astounding thing about Gina Rinehart's $10.3 billion fortune is that it's based on a single asset – the incredibly valuable iron ore tenements left to her by her father Lang Hancock. Since her father's death in 1992, Rinehart has led Hancock
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Museum showcases Tom Price mining history - ABC Local
Google News - over 5 years
... it was really the first iron ore mine that led to the end of the embargo after the Second World War," he said. Some of the items included in the Tom Price exhibition are a 15 tonne Rio Tinto rock shovel bucket and Lang Hancock's prospecting jacket
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How mining and media distort Australia's carbon tax debate - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Rinehart chairs Hancock Prospecting, a resources company founded by her father Lang Hancock in 1952. It has significant iron ore interests in the Pilbara region of Western Australia and has embarked upon large-scale thermal coal projects in Queensland
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PRESS DIGEST-Australian General News - May 26 - Reuters
Google News - over 5 years
The West Australian entered the Rich 200 list in 1992 when she inherited the fortune of her father, Lang Hancock. Page 1. The Australian Energy Regulator's calculation of tax credits for three electricity retailers was overturned yesterday by the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lang Hancock
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1992
    Age 82
    In March 1992 Hancock died, aged 82 years, while living in the guesthouse of the Prix D'Amour, the palatial home he had built for his third wife, Rose.
    More Details Hide Details According to his daughter, the death was "unexpected" and came "despite strong will to live". An autopsy showed that he had died of arteriosclerotic heart disease and police investigation revealed no evidence to contradict that. However, Hancock's daughter insisted that her stepmother had unnaturally hastened his death. Two successive state coroners refused to allow an inquest, but one was eventually granted in 1999 under the direction of the WA Attorney-General, Peter Foss. After preliminary hearings during 2000, the inquest began in April 2001 with an initial estimate of 63 witnesses to be called over five weeks. The inquest was dominated by claims that Porteous had literally nagged Hancock to death with shrill tantrums and arguments. Porteous denied the allegations, famously explaining: "For anyone else it would be a tantrum, for me it's just raising my voice." In the last few days of Hancock's life, Porteous had attempted to pressure him into changing his will and Hancock eventually took out a restraining order against her. The inquest was put on hold after allegations that Rinehart had paid witnesses to appear and that some had lied in their testimony. It resumed three months later with a smaller witness list and ended with the finding that Hancock had died of natural causes and not as a result of Porteous' behaviour.
    On 25 June 1992, less than three months after Hancock's death, Porteous married for the fourth time, to Hancock's long-time friend William Porteous.
    More Details Hide Details Rinehart was indignant at the haste with which her stepmother had remarried. The Prix d'Amour, built in 1990, was bulldozed in March 2006. West Australian finance minister Max Evans mourned the loss of the home as the excavators moved in and recalled Hancock had been bemused by his wife's desire for the sprawling mansion: "He'd say, 'Mr Evans, I don't know why Rose wants this house, I'd be happy sleeping in a transportable.' " Mrs Porteous told him she'd always wanted to live in Prix D'Amour, "but I don't want to clean it", she had added quickly.
  • 1985
    Age 75
    Hancock and Porteous became romantically involved over the course of Porteous' employment and they were wed on 6 July 1985 in Sydney.
    More Details Hide Details It was a third marriage for each of them. Porteous, who was thirty-nine years younger than her husband, was often accused of gold digging because of their age disparity, as well as being unfaithful and promiscuous. As Porteous later stated: "I have been accused of sleeping with every man in Australia... I would have been a very busy woman." Hancock's daughter, Gina Rinehart, who stood to inherit his entire estate, did not attend the wedding. Although the marriage would later prove tumultuous, early on Hancock was clearly infatuated with his young wife. He gave her money and investments in real estate in the Sydney area. Porteous, in turn, helped Hancock to look and act like a much younger man, belying his eight decades. As The Age put it, "Rose made Lang feel younger, sprucing up his wardrobe, dying his hair and getting rid of his cane." Together they built the "Prix d'Amour", a lavish 16-block mansion overlooking the Swan River. The mansion, which was modelled after Tara, the plantation mansion from the movie Gone with the Wind, was the setting for many large parties at which Hancock and Porteous would "dance into the night".
  • 1983
    Age 73
    In 1983, the same year as Hope Hancock's death, Rose Lacson (now Porteous) arrived in Australia from the Philippines on a three-month working visa.
    More Details Hide Details By the arrangement of Hancock's daughter, Gina Rinehart, Porteous began working as a maid for the newly widowed Lang Hancock.
  • 1979
    Age 69
    Hancock bankrolled an unsuccessful secessionist party in the 1970s, and in 1979 published a book, Wake Up Australia, outlining what he saw as the case for Western Australian secession.
    More Details Hide Details The book was launched by Gina Rinehart and Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen. Hancock is quoted as saying, In a 1984 television interview, Hancock suggested forcing unemployed indigenous Australians − specifically "the ones that are no good to themselves and who can't accept things, the half-castes" − to collect their welfare cheques from a central location. "And when they had gravitated there, I would dope the water up so that they were sterile and would breed themselves out in the future, and that would solve the problem."
  • FIFTIES
  • 1969
    Age 59
    In 1969 Hancock and his partner Peter Wright commenced publication in Perth of a weekly newspaper, The Sunday Independent, principally to help further their mining interests.
    More Details Hide Details Faced with strong competition, the newspaper is thought never to have turned a profit, Hancock largely relinquishing his interest in it in the early 70s and Wright selling it to The Truth in 1984. Hancock was a staunch proponent of small government and resented what he considered to be interference by the Commonwealth Government in Western Australian affairs. He declared before a state Royal Commission in 1991 that "I have always believed that the best government is the least government", and that "Although governments do not and cannot positively help business, they can be disruptive and destructive."
  • 1961
    Age 51
    Hancock lobbied furiously for a decade to get the ban lifted and in 1961 was finally able to reveal his discovery and stake his claim.
    More Details Hide Details In the mid sixties Hancock turned once more to Peter Wright and the pair entered into a deal with mining giant Rio Tinto Group to develop the iron ore find. Hancock named it "Hope Downs" after his wife. Under the terms of the deal Rio Tinto set up and still administer a mine in the area. Wright and Hancock walked away with annual royalties of A$25 million, split evenly between the two men. In 1990, Hancock was estimated by Business Review Weekly to be worth a minimum of A$125 million. Although Lang Hancock never aspired to political office, he held strong conservative political views and often entered the political arena. In addition to his activities in the 1950s, lobbying against government restrictions on the mining of iron ore, Hancock donated considerable sums of money to politicians of many political stripes. His political views aligned most closely with the Liberal and National Parties of Australia. He was a good friend and strong supporter of Queensland Premier Joh Bjelke-Petersen and donated A$632,000 to the Queensland National Party while Sir Joh was in charge. He gave A$314,000 to their counterparts in Western Australia, but also gave the Western Australian Labor Party A$985,000; because "at least they can't do any harm". Hancock had had a falling-out with Sir Charles Court and the Western Australian Liberals and was adamant that the Liberals should be kept out of power as long as possible.
  • FORTIES
  • 1952
    Age 42
    The story is widely accepted in modern descriptions of the discovery, but one biographer, Neill Phillipson, disputes Hancock's account. In Man of Iron he argues that there was no rain in the area of the Turner River on 16 November 1952 or indeed on any day in November 1952.
    More Details Hide Details Hancock returned to the area many times and, accompanied by prospector Ken McCamey, followed the iron ore over a distance of 112 km. He soon came to realise that he had stumbled across reserves of iron ore so vast that they could supply the entire world, thus confirming the discovery of the geologist Harry Page Woodward, who after his survey asserted: At the time, however, the common perception was that mineral resources were scarce in Australia. The Commonwealth Government had enacted an embargo on the export of iron ore, while the Government of Western Australia banned the pegging of claims for iron ore prospects.
    On 16 November 1952, Hancock claimed he discovered the world's largest deposit of iron ore in the Pilbara region of Western Australia.
    More Details Hide Details Hancock said he was flying from Nunyerry to Perth with his wife, Hope, when they were forced by bad weather to fly low, through the gorges of the Turner River. In Hancock's own words,
  • THIRTIES
  • 1948
    Age 38
    He sold the remainder of his claim in 1948.
    More Details Hide Details The mine would later become the source of much controversy, when hundreds of cases of asbestos-related diseases came to light.
  • 1947
    Age 37
    During the Second World War, Hancock served in a militia unit and obtained the rank of sergeant. On 4 August 1947, Hancock married his second wife, Hope Margaret Nicholas, the mother of his only acknowledged child, Gina Rinehart. Lang and Hope remained married for 35 years, until her death in 1983 at the age of 66.
    More Details Hide Details In 2012 Hilda Kickett, who had long claimed to be Lang Hancock's illegitimate daughter came forward to claim that the late mining magnate had had an illicit affair with an Aboriginal cook on his property at Mulga Downs resulting in her conception. These claims have not been corroborated. As a child, Hancock showed a keen interest in mining and prospecting and discovered asbestos at Wittenoom Gorge at the age of ten. He staked a claim at Wittenoom in 1934 and began mining blue asbestos there in 1938 with the company Australian Blue Asbestos. The mine attracted the attention of national behemoths CSR Limited, who purchased the claim in 1943. Hancock retained a 49% share after the sale, but appears to have become quickly disillusioned about this arrangement, complaining that CSR viewed their 51% share as a licence to ignore his views.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1935
    Age 25
    Also in 1935, Hancock took over the management of Mulga Downs station from his father.
    More Details Hide Details He partnered with his old schoolmate E. A. "Peter" Wright in running the property, later boasting that no deals between the two men were ever sealed with anything stronger than a handshake.
    As a young man, Hancock was widely considered charming and charismatic. In 1935 he married 21-year-old Susette Maley, described by his biographer Debi Marshall as "an attractive blonde with laughing eyes".
    More Details Hide Details The couple lived at Mulga Downs for many years, but Maley pined for city life and eventually left Hancock to return to Perth. Their separation was amicable.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1909
    Born
    Born on June 10, 1909.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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