Larry Magid
Larry Magid
Larry Magid, also known as Lawrence J. Magid, is an American journalist, technology columnist and commentator. He was born in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Los Angeles. He received his BA from the University of California, Berkeley (1970) and a doctorate of education from the University of Massachusetts Amherst (1981). Magid is on the board of directors of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
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Europe Could Kick Majority of Teens Off Social Media, and That Would Be Tragic
Huffington Post - over 1 year
European youth between 13 and 16 could be banned from social media European policymakers are considering a draft of the European Data Protection Regulation that would prohibit teens under 16 from participating in social media without parental consent. Up until this point, the draft Regulation set the age at 13, which is consistent with laws and practices around the world. I live in North America, but I'm CEO of ConnectSafely.org, a non-profit Internet safety organization that works internationally and -- as a citizen of the world -- I worry about the implications that this policy could have on our "global village," where we need youth to be involved in cross-border conversations to solve some the world's most critical challenges including global terrorism and climate change. While I'm sure there are well-meaning intentions behind this proposal, I worry that it could actually endanger and disenfranchise young people at the very time when we should be doubling down on their eng ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Contrary to Popular Belief, Parents Are Not Clueless About Kids Use of Tech
Huffington Post - over 1 year
A new study commissioned by the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI) found that "the majority of parents are "highly confident" in their ability to manage their child's technology use, and "most feel they know a lot about what their children do when using technology." The survey also found that parents worry about their children's personal safety (75%) and privacy (67%) more than other questions they were asked about such as performance in school (55%), social relationships (54%) and physical health (51%). Most parents (78%) say they believe that technology use has a positive effect on their child's future career and life skills, while 64% think it positively affects his or her creativity. The study Parents, Privacy & Technology Use is available online. In October 2015, Hart Research conducted an online national survey of 589 parents of six to 17 year-olds who access the Internet. Parents are confident and knowledgable One of the most important findings is that nearly ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Social Media and Children's Rights In the Global Village
Huffington Post - over 1 year
It's "the law" in most countries but kids still have very few digital rights. There has been a great deal of talk about online child protection but precious little about children's rights. There are laws on the books of the United States and numerous other countries designed to protect kids against marketers, adult predators and even in each other, in the form of anti-cyberbullying legislation. And there is an entire industry dedicated to helping parents and other adults monitor what kids are doing with connected devices or limit what they can access. So, I was pleased to see that Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs has just published a thorough look at children's rights in the digital age titled One in Three: Internet Governance and Children's Rights. It's written by three of Europe's leading thinkers on Internet safety and children's rights, Sonia Livingstone, Jasmina Byrne and John Carr. Both Livingstone and Carr are part of ConnectSafely's blogger ...
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Huffington Post article
National Media Literacy Week and the U.S. Election Process
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Click above to listen to Larry Magid's conversation with Michelle Ciulla Lipkin of the National Association for Media Literacy Education The United States is about to celebrate its first Media Literacy Week (@MediaLiteracyEd) as Canadians have done for the past decade. While the week is not directly related to the U.S. elections, it does coincide with the early stages of both parties' primary campaigns, which strikes me as a great time to think about media literacy. Very few of us will have a chance to meet any of the candidates face-to-face so what we know about their records, their platforms and their promises comes from the debates, the sound bites we see, hear and read and the analysis of pundits, spin doctors, commentators and reporters. The United States inaugural Media Literacy Week takes place as both the Democrats and Republicans start the process of figuring out who will represent them in the general election in November, 2016. But next year's Media Literacy Week wi ...
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Huffington Post article
Safer Internet Day Celebration Tuesday to Feature Senator Chuck Schumer
Huffington Post - about 3 years
Safer Internet Day event to be webcast from 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday Safer Internet Day (SID) has been celebrated in Europe and around the world since 2004. While a few companies and organizations have sponsored Safer Internet Day programs in the U.S. over the years, there has yet to be an officially sanctioned U.S. event supported by a wide coalition of companies, non-profit organizations and government entities, until now. This year ConnectSafely.org, the non-profit Internet safety organization where I serve as co-director, was appointed as the first U.S. host for Safer Internet Day. On Feb. 11, it will host the official U.S. Safer Internet Day 2014 event in Washington, D.C. The event, which will feature U.S. Senator Charles "Chuck" Schumer, will be a celebration of the positive ways in which we all use the Internet. Young people, educators, representatives from technology companies, youth-serving organizations and government officials will speak along with a panel discussi ...
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Huffington Post article
Internet Governance Forum Tackles Child Protection vs. Child Rights
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Bali, Indonesia -- I'm at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF #IGF2013) in Bali where I'm participating in a workshop on child protection vs. child rights. As a child safety advocate, I've long argued that young people need "digital literacy" to understand how to safely navigate the online world. That can be protecting their emotional well-being by helping them avoid or deal with cyberbullying but it can also be helping young people understand how to protect their privacy online or to make sure they're not posting images or other content that could harm their reputation. It also involves teaching empathy and social-emotional learning to help youth better understand how to treat their peers, whether they be close friends or people they only encounter online. My personal approach to child safety is to start by assuming that "the kids are all right" and -- as a default -- treat children and teens respectfully by providing them with the tools and information they need to protect themselv ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Larry Magid: Facebook Lets Teens Post Publicly: Why That's a Good Thing
The Huffington Post - over 3 years
Facebook announced today that it's changing its policy to allow teens to post publicly. Prior to today, Facebook members aged 13 through 17 were only allowed to post to a limited audience that maxed out with friends of friends. In a blog post, Facebook said that teens will also "be able to turn on Follow so that their public posts can be seen in people's News Feeds" As is the case now, followers can only see posts that they've been authorized to see. When a teen selects "public" as the audience for a post, Facebook will remind the teen that the post can be seen by anyone. There will be some who will no doubt question Facebook's wisdom and motives for allowing teens to share publicly. But I for one am all for it. My reason is simple. Teens deserve the same free speech rights as adults and many teens want to be able to speak out on issues that are important to them. Free speech and youth activism One need only look at the work of Malala Yousafzai, the 16 year-old P ...
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The Huffington Post article
Can Google Kill the Tracking Cookie?
Huffington Post - over 3 years
I usually don't write about rumors, but reports that Google may be working on a replacement for tracking cookies is worth speculating about because it can have enormous implications when it comes to our online privacy. There are reports in USA Today and elsewhere that Google is working on something called AdID which would transmit anonymous user data to advertisers who agree to some basic privacy guidelines. USA Today quoted a source saying that the new technology would give users more control over information collected by them when they browse the web. As background, a cookie is a tiny little text file that websites can put on your computer's hard drive to identify you. If you've ever had your user name automatically entered when you visit a site, it's probably because they put a cookie on your machine with an encrypted version of that information. Hardly anyone complains about those types of cookies because they're there for our convenience. Third-party tracking cookies, though, ...
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Huffington Post article
Smartening Your TV With Google Chromecast
NPR - over 3 years
The latest device that beams your computer to your TV is Google Chromecast. Technology writer Larry Magid tells us how it stacks up against the competition and how the Internet giant will impact streaming TV. » E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us
Article Link:
NPR article
Larry Magid: Researchers at Black Hat Show How to Hack an iPhone With Rogue Charger
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Security researcher Yeongjin Jang shows off rogue iOS charger (Photo: Larry Magid) Have you ever been tempted to use a public charging station for your phone? Chances are it's OK, but three Georgia Tech security researchers at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas showed how easy it is for a rogue "charger" to transfer malware to an iPhone or other iOS device. The "Mactans charger" is actually a small computer masquerading as a charger. When a user plugs an iOS device's into its USB port, the device can transfer malware to the phone in under a minute. Once infected, the attacker can swap out your legitimate apps with malicious ones that can take control of your device. At a press conference ahead of their Black Hat presentation, Billy Lau, Yeongjin Jang and Chengyu Song showed reporters how quickly the device could connect to the phone and replace the phone's legitimate Facebook app with a rogue app. The user does have to enter the password if the phone is protecte ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Larry Magid: Are You Being Stalked Via Cellphone?
Huffington Post - over 3 years
At the National Network to End Domestic Violence Technology Summit 2013 in San Jose, Erica Olsen, senior technology safety specialist for the organization talked about what to look for if you're concerned that someone has planted software on your mobile device to track, spy or stalk you. Of course, some of these can be associated with other issues so they're not necessarily an indicator you're being stalked or tracked and there are ways to track and stalk you without any of these symptoms. Still, this is a useful list. Unusual battery drain or warm when not in use Spikes in data use Takes longer to shut down Screen lights up when not using Clicks or sounds on calls The perpetrator knows things they shouldn't know Perpetrator has or had physical access If you suspect that someone may be tracking you, examine all the apps on your device to see if there any that you didn't install. On an iPhone you can see which apps are running by clicking twice on the home ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Larry Magid: Google Technology and Donations Fight Child Porn
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Google on Saturday said that it's building a "cross industry database" of encrypted "fingerprints" of child sexual abuse images to "enable companies, law enforcement and charities to better collaborate on detecting and removing these images, and to take action against the criminals." The database will be shared with other companies and will include references to images identified by law enforcement and non-profits such as the Internet Watch Foundation and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). Based on my more than 15 years as a NCMEC board member*, I am quite sure that the actual images will not be viewable to individuals other than those who work for law enforcement, NCMEC and other agencies authorized and required to view such images as part of an investigation. The search giant said that it's committing $5 million towards the fight against child porn which includes creating a $2 million Child Protection Technology Fund to encourage the deve ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Larry Magid: Facebook Grapples with Hate Speech
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Media companies, governments and courts have long debated where to draw the line on what speech should be permitted and what should be banned. The FCC, for example, has strict limits on what can be broadcast on radio and TV. Cable, print and online media outlets -- which have no government censors -- still have policies that limit what they publish, broadcast or post There are even some legal limits on speech in the United States, where we have our cherished first amendment. Child pornography, for example, is not protected speech. Social media companies must also grapple with what to permit and what to ban. One difference between social and traditional media is that social media companies' content providers are their members -- not professional journalists. Facebook doesn't make editorial decisions the way a newspaper or broadcaster would. It publishes anything anyone posts as long as it doesn't violate its "community standards" that ban users from posting pornography an ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Larry Magid: How to Create and Use Strong and Unique Passwords (PHOTOS)
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
How to Create (use use) Strong & Unique Passwords from ConnectSafely Strong and confidential passwords are essential, not just for financial sites, but for social networking sites too. With social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, there's the danger of people faking their way into the site and posting something embarrassing about you or others. They could use your account for hate speech or to bully or defame another person or put something on your site that jeopardizes your reputation or even your safety. Another risk is that they could use your online profile to assume your identity as part of a con, such as logging into a person's Facebook account and using it to solicit money from his friends to a "friend" out of a tight spot. Children and teens should be especially careful to never share their passwords, even with their best friends. It's sometimes tempting for kids to give out their password to a friend so that the friend can update or check t ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
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