Lee Strasberg
American actor, drama teacher, acting coach, theorist
Lee Strasberg
Lee Strasberg was an American actor, director and acting teacher. He cofounded, with directors Harold Clurman and Cheryl Crawford, the Group Theatre in 1931, which was hailed as "America's first true theatrical collective". In 1951, he became director of the non-profit Actors Studio, in New York City, considered "the nation's most prestigious acting school". In 1969, Strasberg founded the Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute in New York City and in Hollywood to teach the work he pioneered.
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Lee Strasberg's personal information overview.
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'Private Life': Jane Fonda in all her complexity - USA Today
Google News - over 5 years
The actress had just begun to study with Lee Strasberg and was auditioning for the Actors Studio in New York. By Peter Basch Jane Fonda at 23. The actress had just begun to study with Lee Strasberg and was auditioning for the Actors Studio in New York
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The Monday Interview with Patricia Bosworth - Publishers Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
... actors such as Madeleine Sherwood, Susan Strasberg, Tanya Lopert, my dear friend Marty Fried, and Timmy Everett's family, helped me understand Jane's bulimia and depression, as well as the effect Lee Strasberg had on all of us as a master teacher
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Jane Fonda - Entertainment Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
... her lifelong quest to win her father Henry Fonda's approval, and her years of study in 1950s New York City, rendered so definitively here that you can almost smell the cigarette smoke in the hallway outside Lee Strasberg's acting class
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Interview, Portrait: Lesley Ann Warren 'In Plain Sight' - HollywoodChicago.com
Google News - over 5 years
Born in New York City, Warren studied under Lee Strasberg at the famed Actors Studio, the youngest student to ever be accepted at 17 years of age. A year later she made a huge debut in the television remake of Rodgers and Hammerstein's “Cinderella”
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Jane Fonda's New Biography: 14 Juicy Bits - Daily Beast
Google News - over 5 years
When Jane returned to New York, her friend Susan Strasberg encouraged her to take lessons with her father, the legendary acting coach Lee Strasberg. Jane dismissed the idea. Susan didn't know her well enough at the time, but she would later realize
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The Devil and Demian Bichir
NYTimes - over 5 years
You can learn a lot about a man by the way he disembowels an avocado. Demian Bichir, the Mexican film star, stood in my kitchen at lunchtime testing the pile of avocados on the counter. He wanted to make guacamole the way he used to as a busboy at Rosa Mexicano in the 1980s, during his first sustained lap as an actor in the United States. Instead
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Her Life Since Then: Different Views of It
NYTimes - over 5 years
JANE FONDA: The Private Life of a Public Woman By Patricia Bosworth Illustrated. 596 pages. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. $30. PRIME TIME By Jane Fonda Illustrated. 416 pages. Random House. $27. 2000: Jane Fonda tacitly agrees to let Patricia Bosworth write a biography of her. But she is not willing to speak directly with Ms. Bosworth because she is
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Bruce Dern: 'Television Excites Me Much More Now Than It Ever Did' - Reuters
Google News - over 5 years
My first play on Broadway, the director was released the tenth day of rehearsals, and Mr. Strasberg [Actors Studio director Lee Strasberg] directed it. That was my Broadway debut, and then Kazan put me under contract for the next three years
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Acting Classes at Jubilee - FWWeekly
Google News - over 5 years
... Theatre artistic director Tre Garrett will conduct a syllabus-based six month actor training program that focuses on the so-called Method System pioneered by Stanislavski and popularized in the US by Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio in New York
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Sideshow: As another 'Twilight' wraps, star emotes - Philadelphia Inquirer
Google News - over 5 years
"I used it to pay tuition at Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute in Manhattan. It's safe to say I was the only one paying his way with money from a bus-crash settlement." NBC's Saturday Night Live premieres its 37th season on Sept
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CALLING ALL COMEDIANS! Comedy Challenge 2011 - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
He studied drama at the Lee Strasberg Theater Institute and at HB Studios. He studied theater singing with Julia Sperratore and Helen Gallagher. Beau later taught drama at the Lincoln Center Square for the Arts. It was at this time Beau began working
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Judyth Piazza chats with Revered Acting Coach John Pallotta - Student Operated Press
Google News - over 5 years
Drawing on wisdom absorbed from the masters Lee Strasberg, Uta Hagen, Herbert Berghof, Anne Jackson, William Hickey and many more in 2005 he founded John Pallotta Studio in New York City , where he has honed a highly successful approach that emphasizes
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Patch Chat: Renée Felice Smith - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
RFS: I went to NYU for drama, at the Tisch School of the Arts. I studied there and I studied at the Lee Strasberg Institute, which was a branch of Tisch for many, many years. It's no longer a studio within Tisch. Tisch is sort of the umbrella,
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Come and get these memories - Tonawanda News
Google News - over 5 years
Along the way, she explained, came drama training at the Lee Strasberg Institute in New York, a televised duet with opera singer Beverly Sills, writing a film score, solo albums that demonstrated she was more than an oldies act, with regular references
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Marilyn Monroe 'Sex' Film to Hit the Auction Block - International Business Times AU
Google News - over 5 years
Monroe's property had been left to her acting coach Lee Strasberg whose wife and daughter took possession when he died. Books in the photo, most of them plays, are by [Graham Greene, Henry James, and Norman Corwin among others
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ReGroup revives 'lost' plays - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 5 years
But there's more to The Group Theatre than a punch line – or the historical footnote that this Depression-era theater, founded in 1931 by Clurman, Cheryl Crawford and Lee Strasberg, eventually morphed into the 1950s Actors Studio, purveyors of Marlon
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George McFly And 9 Other Unsung Movie Titans - Sabotage Times
Google News - over 5 years
This master of the quietly disgruntled everyman and student of the Lee Strasberg school of acting Grodin is a joy to watch when he's on form although not so much of a joy to work with it has been reported. Unfortunately for us he has other interests
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What TV show makes Flashpoint's Amy Jo Johnson cry? - Globe and Mail
Google News - over 5 years
Born and raised in Cape Cod, Mass., Johnson was a competitive gymnast who relocated to New York in order to study at the Lee Strasberg Theatre and the American Musical and Acting Academy. Her gymnastic skills factored into an auspicious TV debut in
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lee Strasberg
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1982
    Age 80
    His last public appearance was on February 14, 1982, at Night of 100 Stars in the Radio City Music Hall, a benefit for the Actors Fund.
    More Details Hide Details Along with Al Pacino and Robert De Niro, he danced in the chorus line with the Rockettes. Actress Ellen Burstyn recalled that evening: Late in the evening, I wandered into the greenroom and saw Lee sitting next to Anna, watching the taping on the monitor. I sat next to him and we chatted a little. Lee wasn't one for small talk, so I didn't stay long. But before I got up, I said, 'Lee, I've been asked to run for president of Actors Equity.' He reached over and patted me on the back, 'That's wonderful, dahling. Congratulations.' Those were the last words he ever said to me. Two days later, early in the morning, I was still asleep when the door to my bedroom opened. I woke up and saw my friend and assistant, Katherine Cortez, enter the room and walk toward me. 'We just got a call. Lee Strasberg died.' No, no, no, I wailed, over and over. 'I'm not ready', and pulled the covers over my head. I had told myself that I must be prepared for this, but I was not prepared. What was I to do now? Who would I work for when I was preparing for a role? Who would I go to when I was in trouble?. His memorial service was held at the Shubert Theater where A Chorus Line was playing.
    On February 17, 1982, Lee Strasberg suffered a fatal heart attack in New York City, aged 80.
    More Details Hide Details With him at his death at the hospital were his third wife, Anna, and their two sons. He was interred at Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. A day before his unexpected death, he was officially notified that he had been elected to the American Theatre Hall of Fame.
  • 1970
    Age 68
    By 1970, Strasberg had become less involved with the Actors Studio, and with his third wife Anna, opened the Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute with branches in New York City and in Hollywood, to continue teaching the 'system' of Konstantin Stanislavski, which he had interpreted and developed, particularly in light of the ideas of Yevgeny Vakhtangov, for contemporary actors.
    More Details Hide Details The institute's primary stated goal was "to reach a larger audience of eager and emerging talent" than was served by the Actors Studio's notoriously selective admission process, and as teachers of the method began to deploy their own personal interpretations of the discipline, "to dispel growing confusion and misrepresentation of the method, preserving what had by now become fundamental discoveries in actor training." The Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute has its own rigorous sets of entrance criteria required for admission into their program. Former student Elia Kazan directed James Dean in East of Eden (1955), for which Kazan and Dean were nominated for Academy Awards. As a student, Dean wrote that Actors Studio was "the greatest school of the theater and the best thing that can happen to an actor". Playwright Tennessee Williams, writer of A Streetcar Named Desire, said of Strasberg's actors, "They act from the inside out. They communicate emotions they really feel. They give you a sense of life." Directors such as Sidney Lumet, a former student, have intentionally used actors skilled in Strasberg's "method".
  • FIFTIES
  • 1955
    Age 53
    In 1955, Strasberg student James Dean died in a car accident, at age 24.
    More Details Hide Details Strasberg, during a regular lecture shortly after this accident, discussed Dean. The following are excerpts from a transcription of his recorded lecture: In the middle of his lecture on another topic) To hell with it! I hadn't planned to say this, because I don't know how I'll behave when I say it; I don't think it will bother me. But I saw Jimmy Dean in Giant the other night, and I must say that – weeps You see, that's what I was afraid of. long pause When I got in the cab, I cried. What I cried at was the waste, the waste. If there is anything in the theatre to which I respond more than anything else – maybe I'm getting old, or maybe I'm getting sentimental – it is the waste in the theatre, the talent that gets up and the work that goes into getting it up and getting it where it should be. And then when it gets there, what the hell happens with it? The senseless destruction, the senseless waste, the hopping about from one thing to the next, the waste of the talent, the waste of your lives, the strange kind of behavior that not just Jimmy had, you see, but that a lot of you here have and a lot of other actors have that are going through exactly the same thing....
  • FORTIES
  • 1951
    Age 49
    Strasberg assumed leadership of the studio in 1951 as its artistic director. "As a teacher and acting theorist, he revolutionized American actor training and engaged such remarkable performers as Kim Hunter, Marilyn Monroe, Julie Harris, Paul Newman, Geraldine Page, Ellen Burstyn, and Al Pacino."
    More Details Hide Details Since its inception, the studio has been a nonprofit educational corporation chartered by the state of New York, and has been supported entirely by contributions and benefits. We have here the possibility of creating a kind of theatre that would be a shining medal for our country", Strasberg said in 1959. UCLA acting teacher Robert Hethmon writes, "The Actors Studio is a refuge. Its privacy is guarded ferociously against the casual intruder, the seeker of curiousities, and the exploiter... The Studio helps actors to meet the enemy within... and contributes greatly to Strasberg's utterly pragmatic views on training the actor and solving his problems... and is kept deliberately modest in its circumstances, its essence being the private room where Lee Strasberg and some talented actors can work." Strasberg wrote: "At the studio, we do not sit around and feed each other's egos. People are shocked how severe we are on each other." Admission to the Actors Studio was usually by audition with more than a thousand actors auditioning each year and the directors usually conferring membership on only five or six each year. "The Studio was, and is sui generis", said Elia Kazan, proudly. Beginning in a small, private way, with a strictly off-limits-to-outsiders policy, the Studio quickly earned a high reputation in theatre circles. "It became the place to be, the forum where all the most promising and unconventional young actors were being cultivated by sharp young directors " Actors who have worked at the studio include Julie Harris, Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton, Anne Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman, Patricia Neal, Rod Steiger, Mildred Dunnock, Eva Marie Saint, Eli Wallach, Anne Jackson, Ben Gazzara, Sidney Poitier, Karl Malden, Gene Wilder, Shelley Winters, Dennis Hopper, and Sally Field.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1934
    Age 32
    In 1934, he married actress and drama coach Paula Miller (1909–1966) until her death from cancer in 1966.
    More Details Hide Details They were the parents of actress Susan Strasberg (1938–1999) and acting teacher John Strasberg (born 1941). His third wife was the former Anna Mizrahi (b. April 16, 1939) and the mother of his two youngest children, Adam Lee Strasberg and David Lee Israel Strasberg.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1931
    Age 29
    He gained a reputation with the Theater Guild of New York and helped form the Group Theater in New York in 1931.
    More Details Hide Details There, he created a technique which became known as "the method" or "method acting." His teaching style owed much to the Russian practitioner, Konstantin Stanislavski, whose book, An Actor Prepares (published in English in 1936), dealt with the psychology of acting. He began by directing, but his time was gradually taken up by the training of actors. Called "America’s first true theatrical collective", the Lab immediately offered a few tuition-free scholarships for its three-year program to "promising students". Publishers Weekly wrote, "The Group Theatre... with its self-defined mission to reconnect theater to the world of ideas and actions, staged plays that confronted social and moral issues... with members Harold Clurman, Lee Strasberg, Stella and Luther Adler, Clifford Odets, Elia Kazan, and an ill-assorted band of idealistic actors living hand to mouth are seen welded in a collective of creativity that was also a tangle of jealousies, love affairs, and explosive feuds." Playwright Arthur Miller said "the Group Theatre was unique and probably will never be repeated. For a while it was literally the voice of Depression America". Cofounder Harold Clurman, in describing what Strasberg brought to the Group Theater, wrote: Lee Strasberg is one of the few artists among American theater directors. He is the director of introverted feeling, of strong emotion curbed by ascetic control, sentiment of great intensity muted by delicacy, pride, fear, shame. The effect he produces is a classic hush, tense and tragic, a constant conflict so held in check that a kind of beautiful spareness results.
  • 1926
    Age 24
    His first marriage was to Nora Krecaum on October 29, 1926, until her death three years later in 1929.
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  • 1925
    Age 23
    In 1925, Strasberg had his first professional appearance in Processional, a play produced by the Theater Guild.
    More Details Hide Details According to Schickel: What Strasberg... took away from the Actor's Lab was a belief that just as an actor could be prepared physically for his work with dance, movement, and fencing classes, he could be mentally prepared by resort to analogous mental exercises. They worked on relaxation as well as concentration. They worked with nonexistent objects that helped prepare them for the exploration of equally ephemeral emotions. They learned to use “affective memory”, as Strasberg called the most controversial aspect of his teaching – summoning emotions from their own lives to illuminate their stage roles. Strasberg believed he could codify this system, a necessary precursor to teaching it to anyone who wanted to learn it... He became a director more preoccupied with getting his actors to work in the “correct” way than he was in shaping the overall presentation.
  • 1923
    Age 21
    Kazan biographer Richard Schickel described Strasberg's first experiences to the "art" of acting: He dropped out of high school, worked in a shop that made hairpieces, drifted into the theater via a settlement house company and... had his life-shaping revelation when Stanislavski brought his Moscow Art Theatre to the United States in 1923.
    More Details Hide Details He had seen good acting before, of course, but never an ensemble like this with actors completely surrendering their egos to the work. He observed, first of all, that all the actors, whether they were playing leads or small parts, worked with the same commitment and intensity. No actors idled about posing and preening (or thinking about where they might dine after the performance). More important, every actor seemed to project some sort of unspoken, yet palpable, inner life for his or her character. This was acting of a sort that one rarely saw on the American stage... where there was little stress on the psychology of the characters or their interactions. Strasberg was galvanized. He knew that his own future as an actor – he was a slight and unhandsome man – was limited. But he soon perceived that as a theoretician and teacher of this new 'system' it might become a major force in American theater. Strasberg eventually left the Clare Tree Major School to study with students of Stanislavski – Maria Ouspenskaya and Richard Boleslavsky – at the American Laboratory Theatre.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1918
    Age 16
    Young Strasberg took refuge in voracious reading and the companionship of his older brother, Zalmon, whose death in the 1918 influenza epidemic was so traumatic for the young Strasberg that, despite being a straight-A student, he dropped out of high school.
    More Details Hide Details A relative introduced him to the theater by giving him a small part in a Yiddish-language production being performed by the Progressive Drama Club. He later joined the Chrystie Street Settlement House's drama club. Philip Loeb, casting director of the Theater Guild, sensed that Strasberg could act, although he was not yet thinking of a full-time acting career, and was still working as a shipping clerk and bookkeeper for a wig company. When he was 23 years old, he enrolled in the Clare Tree Major School of the Theater. He became a naturalized United States citizen on January 16, 1939, in New York City at the New York Southern District Court.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1901
    Born
    Born on November 17, 1901.
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