Lena Guerrero
American politician
Lena Guerrero
Lena Guerrero Aguirre, known as Lena Guerrero, was the first woman and the first person of ethnic minority background to have served on the Texas Railroad Commission, an elected body which currently regulates the oil and natural gas industry. In 1992, her once promising political career ended over a falsified résumé. Sixteen years later, she died of brain cancer at the age of fifty.
Biography
Lena Guerrero's personal information overview.
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News
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I repubblicani attendono il candidato più forte. E Rick Perry prende la rincorsa - Europaquotidiano.it
Google News - over 5 years
Rieletto per tre volte, guadagnerà persino l'endorsement dell'ex collega di partito Lena Guerrero, una democratica liberal «conquistata dalle sue doti umane». Già dato per favorito nei sondaggi telefonici che una società di rilevazione statistica ha
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James Richard Perry - NewsWithViews.com
Google News - over 5 years
He befriended fellow freshman state representative Lena Guerrero of Austin, a staunch liberal Democrat who endorsed Perry's reelection bid in 2006 on personal, rather than philosophical grounds. Perry supported Al Gore in the 1988 Democratic
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PAC Man
NYTimes - about 14 years
BOY GENIUS Karl Rove, the Brains Behind the Remarkable Political Triumph of George W. Bush. By Lou Dubose, Jan Reid and Carl M. Cannon. 253 pp. New York: PublicAffairs. Paper, $15. THE role of éminence grise is so well established in American presidential politics and myth that almost every White House has an aide who becomes world-famous for
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NYTimes article
Political Memo; A Landslide Remakes Texas's Political Landscape
NYTimes - over 23 years
For Texas Democrats, and for Gov. Ann W. Richards in particular, it is not a good sign when party insiders here start making nervous cracks about Yellow Dog Republicans. There has never been any such thing as a Yellow Dog Republican in Texas, of course. From the Civil War on, the term applied to loyal Democrats, so named, the legend goes, because
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NYTimes article
Lie by Texas Politician Puts Twist in Campaign
NYTimes - over 24 years
Lena Guerrero started in politics young and put the dusty poverty of South Texas behind her quickly. After she addressed the Democratic National Convention in July her backers said this young, talented Hispanic woman could go to the top. Governor, senator, even President, some said. Nobody is making those predictions anymore. On Sept. 24, after
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NYTimes article
THE 1992 CAMPAIGN: Political Pulse -- Texas; In Texas, Three 'Neighbors' Battle for a Vital Prize
NYTimes - over 24 years
More than anywhere else, perhaps, the Presidential campaign begins all over again this weekend in Texas, the nation's third-most-populous state. This is, after all, President Bush's political base. It is also Ross Perot's home turf, and Bill Clinton, born just a few miles across the Arkansas border, has had close ties to Texas since his earliest
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NYTimes article
THE 1992 CAMPAIGN: Campaign Trail; Quayle Sees Good Side To What Perot Decides
NYTimes - over 24 years
Vice President Dan Quayle says Ross Perot "certainly sounds" like a candidate to him, and he has some thoughts about whether a Perot candidacy would help the Bush-Quayle ticket or the Clinton-Gore ticket. "If Ross Perot runs, that's good for us," Mr. Quayle told pack of reporters yesterday in Rockford, Ill. "If he doesn't run," he added, "it's good
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NYTimes article
Texas Official Resigns Over Falsified Resume
NYTimes - over 24 years
A state official who addressed the Democratic National Convention in July has resigned as head of the Texas Railroad Commission, apologizing for the false claims she has made for 12 years about a college degree. The official, Lena Guerrero, a protege of Gov. Ann W. Richards, said on Thursday, however, that she would remain the Democratic candidate
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THE NATION; Reborn to Win, the Democrats Party On
NYTimes - over 24 years
THE big band played "Mood Indigo." The hoi polloi squeezed into a horseshoe balcony high above the swells. A Southern belle dressed in pink moved through the crowd surrounded by swains in black tie. And not far away, a younger, blonde debutante giggled with her circle of female admirers. The soigne party was longer on big hair and sequins than
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ON TELEVISION -- CAMPAIGN WATCH; ABC and C-Span Attended Different Parties Together
NYTimes - over 24 years
Months of meticulous planning went into this week's Democratic National Convention so that nothing -- not the speakers, the singers or the words that appeared on the "video wall" -- would be left to chance. In the end, though, the impression that will be left with the folks back home is likely to depend on one simple factor beyond the Democrats'
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UNDER THE BIG TOP -- OVERVIEW; DEMOCRATS, EMPHASIZING UNITY, EMBRACE A MODERATE PLATFORM
NYTimes - over 24 years
With the last challenge to Bill Clinton's hegemony fading, the least contentious, most confident Democratic National Convention in years adopted a platform last night fashioned to match the moderate prescription for victory that he has championed. Seeking to capitalize on the national mood of discontent with Washington and distaste for politics,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lena Guerrero
    FIFTIES
  • 2008
    Age 50
    Died on April 24, 2008.
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  • FORTIES
  • 2006
    Age 48
    Though a staunch Democrat, Guerrero endorsed the reelection in 2006 of Republican Governor Rick Perry; the two had a friendship that began in 1985 when both were freshmen Democratic legislators.
    More Details Hide Details Guerrero said that while she and Perry disagreed on certain issues, they had a relationship of "civility". Perry won his general election with 39 percent of the vote over four rivals, including Carole Strayhorn, a Democrat-turned-Republican-turned-Independent. On Guerrero's death, Perry directed that flags at the Texas State Capitol and other state buildings be flown at half-staff in her memory. He described Guerrero as a "bright, passionate woman who worked hard to represent the interests of her constituents.... She was the sort of person who placed loyalty and principle ahead of politics." Former Speaker Pete Laney of Hale Center, a Democrat, agreed with Perry: "I don't think there was anyone who was more passionate about their service in the legislature or (about) their constituents and beliefs." Strayhorn said that Guerrero "did so much at a very young age, certainly knocked down a lot of barriers for women and Hispanics and all of the above."
  • 2000
    Age 42
    She resigned two months short of her being able to enter the State's health insurance program, which worked against her financially when she was stricken in 2000 with two malignant brain tumors.
    More Details Hide Details Guerrero underwent proton beam therapy at Loma Linda University Medical Center near San Bernardino, California. Lobbyist Mignon McGarry said that Guerrero went for treatment at Loma Linda after having been admonished by physicians at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston that she would otherwise not live more than two years.
  • 1998
    Age 40
    In a 1998 interview with the Houston Chronicle, Guerrero reflected that she had mishandled her resignation from the Railroad Commission. "... if you can't learn and go on and you dwell too much in the past, then you're really wasting your present."
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1992
    Age 34
    In 1992, Guerrero faced voters in her bid for a six-year term on the Railroad Commission.
    More Details Hide Details When it was revealed that Guerrero had lied about having graduated from UT, the momentum shifted heavily to her Republican opponent, attorney Barry Williamson, a native of Arkansas. Guerrero later obtained her UT degree—she had been nineteen credits short of a bachelor's degree—and became an Austin lobbyist for Bravo Communications, representing such clients as American Telephone & Telegraph, Blue Cross, and the Tigua Indians. She helped pass a bill to allow the Tigua Indians casinos on their reservation. In defending her position, Guerrero said that the issue "is not about gambling. This is about the Indians and their right to use their land."
  • 1991
    Age 33
    In 1991, Governor Ann W. Richards, a fellow Democrat, appointed Guerrero to fill a vacancy on the three-member Railroad Commission.
    More Details Hide Details Her selection was said to have symbolized Richards' hope of a "New Texas"; prior to that, the commission's members had always been white males.
  • 1989
    Age 31
    In 1989, Guerrero was named among the "Top 10" legislators by Texas Monthly magazine.
    More Details Hide Details She was cited in Newsweek and USA Today and, having left the legislature, was awarded a speaking slot at the 1992 Democratic National Convention in New York City, which nominated Bill Clinton of Arkansas to oppose incumbent George Herbert Walker Bush of Texas. She was also executive director of the Texas Women's Political Caucus.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1984
    Age 26
    In 1984, at the age of twenty-five, she became the second female Hispanic to be elected to the Texas House of Representatives.
    More Details Hide Details She defeated five male opponents in a then Anglo-but-Democratic-majority district. No Republican contested the seat despite the landslide victory that year of Ronald W. Reagan as U.S. President. Guerrero's district included parts of Central and East Austin.
  • 1979
    Age 21
    At the age of twenty-one in 1979, she was elected president of the Young Democrats of Texas.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1977
    Age 19
    In the race for Railroad Commissioner, Guerrero had expected to face Carole Rylander, then a Democrat Guerrero had supported in the successful nonpartisan race for mayor of Austin in 1977.
    More Details Hide Details However, Rylander, later Carole Strayhorn, lost the Republican primary to Williamson. Strayhorn's second husband, Hill Rylander, as president of the UT Alumni Association, learned that Guerrero did not have the college degree that she claimed when the association planned to honor her as a "distinguished alumna". Some official biographies at the time indicated Guerrero was a member of Phi Beta Kappa; she was not.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1957
    Born
    Born on November 27, 1957.
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