Leos Carax
Film director
Leos Carax
Alexandre Oscar Dupont, best known as Leos Carax, is a French film director, critic, and writer. Carax is noted for his poetic style and his tortured depictions of love. His first major work was Boy Meets Girl (1984), and his notable works include Les Amants du Pont-Neuf (1991) and the controversial Pola X (1999). His professional name is an anagram of his first name 'Alex', and 'Oscar', his middle.
Biography
Leos Carax's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Leos Carax
Show More Show Less
News
News abour Leos Carax from around the web
Christopher Atamian: Holy Motors! Leos Carax Is Back
Huffington Post - about 4 years
So many people whose opinions I respect have waxed poetic about Leos Carax's Holy Motors that I hesitate before proffering any type of criticism about this respected French director's latest effort. Holy Motors is an extraordinary acting tour de force, a filmic reverie whose real topic is film history and the film medium itself -- in this sense it is wholly self-referential. And it is true that the film is in fact so seamlessly put together and brilliantly acted by both its leads -- Denis Lavant and Edith Scob -- that one can almost forgive the fact that it is also achingly boring and pretentious. As I watched it in the theater with a few hundred seemingly engrossed spectators, I began to understand what some of the dazed English majors felt like in college when attending lectures in the comp lit department on Deconstruction and the work of Jacques Derrida. The theory and comp lit majors sat mesmerized while the equally bright English majors listened on, to quote another film' ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Jon Eig: Obligatory Oscar Reaction
Huffington Post - about 4 years
This is, as the title says, obligatory. Whether you work in an office or a garage, have a nationally syndicated radio talk show or a lone friend you Skype with in Argentina, you will very likely express an opinion on the Oscar nominations. I intend to write something soon about the Oscar phenomenon, how it has evolved over the years, and what it really means. But this is obligatory. With minimal thought, here are some immediate reactions: PICTURE: OK, there are ten of them, and that's almost certainly too many. How many of you picked Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close or Tree of Life in your Oscar pool last year? It's hard to get too worked up when you have this many nominees. I'm happy for Amour, and I suppose it's too much to ask for a second foreign language film to be recognized, but I would have loved to have seen Holy Motors get a nod. To me, it was much more fun than Les Miserables. And I personally preferred Cloud Atlas to a lot of the nominees, but I u ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Brian Formo: 2012 Year in Film: The Studios Stepped up, But Independent and International Still Tops
Huffington Post - about 4 years
As awards begin to be handed out rewarding the films released in 2012 you'll start to hear that 2012 was a sweeping return to form for the studio prestige picture. While studios did have a stellar year (in comparison to years past of this decade, Django Unchained, Zero Dark Thirty, Argo, Lincoln, Magic Mike and sections of Prometheus are certainly hallmarks of the studio system, particularly at a time when most studio films are spandexed superheroes, remakes or an endless cycle of sequels) and deserve a pat on the back for their efforts; for me, 2012 was a very good year for film, but still largely the bests of the year came from the independent and international films this year; with career highs (Wes Anderson, Moonrise Kingdom; Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty), autueristic re-enforcers (Paul Thomas Anderson, The Master; David Cronenberg, Cosmopolis), welcome cinematic returns (Leos Carax, Holy Motors), new visionaries (Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild; Joachim Tr ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Now Playing
San Francisco Chronicle - about 4 years
Now Playing Anna Karenina Joe Wright's misguided and miscast version of the Tolstoy classic uses a host of distancing devices - namely doing the movie as though it took place on a stage - but the effect is to render something cold that should have been warm. Any Day Now Travis Fine's unflinching drama offers a convincing portrait of a 1970s gay couple whose ability to do the right thing is challenged when fear of the unknown eclipses their community's capacity for logic and compassion. Argo That Ben Affleck can direct a film this smart, this gripping, is no surprise any longer, but still - his account of a rescue effort during the Iran hostage crisis is as precise as it is suspenseful. Affleck plays the CIA operative who aims to fly out six Americans posing as a film crew for a fake movie. Chasing Ice This documentary presents striking visual evidence of global warming in the form of time-lapse photo sequences of glaciers melting and breaking up. The film mig ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Now Playing
San Francisco Chronicle - about 4 years
Now Playing Anna Karenina Joe Wright's misguided and miscast version of the Tolstoy classic uses a host of distancing devices - namely doing the movie as though it took place on a stage - but the effect is to render something cold that should have been warm. Argo That Ben Affleck can direct a film this smart, this gripping, is no surprise any longer, but still - his account of a rescue effort during the Iran hostage crisis is as precise as it is suspenseful. Affleck plays the CIA operative who aims to fly out six Americans posing as a film crew for a fake movie. The Big Picture Based on Douglas Kennedy's 1997 novel, this ambitious French thriller focuses on a Parisian lawyer (Romain Duris) who kills his wife's lover, a photographer, then assumes his identity and goes on the lam. Chasing Ice This documentary presents striking visual evidence of global warming in the form of time-lapse photo sequences of glaciers melting and breaking up. The film shows us too m ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Now Playing
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
Now Playing Anna Karenina Joe Wright's misguided and miscast version of the Tolstoy classic uses a host of distancing devices - namely doing the movie as though it took place on a stage - but the effect is to render something cold that should have been warm. Argo The fact that Ben Affleck can direct a film this smart and this gripping is no longer a surprise to anyone, but even so - his account here of a rescue effort during the Iran hostage crisis in 1980 is as precise as it is suspenseful. Affleck plays the CIA operative who aims to fly out six Americans posing as a film crew for a fake movie. The Big Picture Based on Douglas Kennedy's 1997 novel, this ambitious French thriller focuses on a Parisian lawyer (Romain Duris) who kills his wife's lover, a photographer, then assumes his identity and goes on the lam. Brooklyn Castle This captivating documentary by Katie Dellamaggiore tells the uplifting story of the chess program at Brooklyn's Intermediate School 1 ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Brian Formo: A Conversation with Eva Mendes: The Dreams and Nightmares of Holy Motors
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Holy Motors is many things, but mostly it is a dream. Leos Carax's new film is a series of scenarios with Denis Lavant playing a different character every time he steps out of a limousine -- entering into varied fantasies and, perhaps, some realities. Eva Mendes plays a fashion model that Lavant kidnaps in one section of the film. Following Holy Motors screening at the AFI Festival in Hollywood (you can read my review, a big recommendation, here), I had the pleasure of chatting with her about the film. Q: First off, let me just say that I loved Holy Motors so I appreciate you taking the time to talk to me about your involvement in this film. How did you become involved in the film and what was it like to work with (director) Leos Carax? Eva Mendes: I've been a Leos Carax fan for a while. Lovers on a Bridge is such a beautiful, romantic film. I've always wanted to work with him but he's kind of averaging doing a film every decade. I thought maybe it was just wishfu ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
'Holy Motors' review: You decide
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
'Holy Motors' review: You decide The latest from the eccentric French director, Leos Carax, is a thoroughly unclassifiable film about a man who rides around in a limousine, going from appointment to appointment, assuming a completely different identity at each stop. By far, the most important thing about "Holy Motors" is that, though there is madness in it, there is none of the insufferable French whimsy that you find in, say, the worst films of Jean-Pierre Jeunet ("Delicatessen," "Micmacs"). The sensibility here is tough, and though it's unclear exactly what this movie is saying, whatever it's saying is not reassuring. Denis Lavant, who plays the lead character, never presumes upon the viewer's affections. Ultimately, it seems that some kind of statement about cinema is at play in "Holy Motors." Edith Scob, who plays the chauffeur, was the title character in "Eyes Without a Face" many years ago, and at one point she wears the white mask that she wore in that ...
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
'Holy Motors' ★★★ 1/2
Chicago Times - over 4 years
"Holy Motors," an exuberant jape as well as a beautiful ode to the movies, to play-acting and to Paris, comes from the French writer-director Leos Carax, re-teaming here with actor Denis Lavant. Lavant got robbed at the Cannes Film Festival this year, losing the best actor award to Mads Mikkelsen ("The Hunt"). Now you can find out why I think this is so.
Article Link:
Chicago Times article
Review: Holy Motors - Has Kylie Finally Made A Decent Film?
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Earlier this year, Kylie Minogue admitted that her new film, Holy Motors, left her "as confused as the person next to me" and, after seeing the film for myself at its London premiere (admittedly, not sitting next to the lady herself), I'm inclined to agree. Kylie has as much chance of explaining Holy Motors as anyone else... and she says it's "sublime" Not that Holy Motors is a bad film. On the contrary, I was as transfixed as audiences at Cannes this year, where it was one of the most raved about films of the festival. Kylie described it as "outrageously beautiful", a "sublime" film that "gets you thinking and gets you stimulated". The Delinquents it ain't. Kylie was in London for the UK premiere of Holy Motors, looking delighted to be back on the big screen Of course, to call it Kylie's new film is a little off the mark as she only takes up about 15 minutes of screen time. But despite her brief appearance, playing Eva Grace, it's the most daring, off-k ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
VIFF Opening Film Chosen
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Midnight’s Children, Canadian filmmaker Deepa Mehta’s tale of India in the years after it gained independence, will be the opening film of the Vancouver International Film Festival later this month. The film, based on Salman Rushdie’s Booker Prize-winning novel, has its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival this week. Artistic director Alan Franey says VIFF looks for a Canadian film that’s a real crowd-pleaser to open the festival. “We look for a film that is entertaining and will put people in a good mood and that reminds them what world cinema is about,” he told CBC News. Mehta has been a popular filmmaker at the Vancouver festival in the past, with much-loved works such as Water and Bollywood/Hollywood. Rushdie collaborated closely with her in making the film. “It’s not just the literary value, it is a real pleasure to watch, you get into its pace because of the beautiful score,” Frane ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
It's a wrap: Amid froth of the Cannes Film Festival, movies explored our age of anxiety
Fox News - over 4 years
There was Brad Pitt and Nicole Kidman, red carpet glamour and a crop of new Academy Award contenders — but this was also the year the global financial crisis exploded onto movie screens at Cannes. "La Crise" — as the French call it — bedeviled Robert Pattinson's disaster-bound billionaire in David Cronenberg's "Cosmopolis," the unemployed Glasgow youth in Ken Loach's "The Angels' Share," the bare-knuckle boxer in Jacques Audiard's "Rust and Bone" and the worried mobsters in Andrew Dominik's "Killing Them Softly." We live in anxious times, and that feeling was reflected at the French Riviera film festival that's a byword for frocks and froth, as well as for serious cinema. The mood seemed to be mirrored by the weather. Several days were unseasonably cold and stormy, turning red-carpet photocalls into rain-lashed ordeals. In the face of this angst, the jury rewarded love, giving Cannes' top prize, the Palme d'Or, to Austria ...
Article Link:
Fox News article
Cannes 2012: A fest filled with wild (and divisive) experiments
LATimes - over 4 years
CANNES, France — The Cannes Film Festival didn't see a breakout on the order of “The Artist” this year. And yet “The Artist” was everywhere. The silent film's sense of playfulness and disregard for convention pretty much infused the festival. Wherever one looked, there seemed to be another bold experiment — sometimes delighting audiences, often polarizing them. Among the more well-received movies of the 65th edition of Cannes, which wrapped Sunday evening, was Leos Carax's “Holy Motors,” a surrealist romp through the streets of Paris. Some of its touches: A man biting the body parts off people at a cemetery-set photo shoot and limousines that spoke to one another in darkened garages. Carax was hardly alone in his eccentricity. The Mexican director Carlos Reygadas offered “Post Tenebras Lux,” a dreamlike story shot with distorted lenses that featured a sex club where rooms are named after famous intellectuals. The film divided audiences but earned him the director's award. Mic ...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Rollo Ross: Tired of Cannes
Popeater - over 4 years
It's Day 10 of Cannes and the annual festival fatigue has well and truly set in. I arrived at the press junket for the new HBO movie Hemingway and Gellhorn to find most of the other journalists there acting like doped up zombies. Even Nicole Kidman tells me how exhausted she is before my interview starts in a croaky Southern drawl crossed with Australian accent (when did she start talking like this?) and she's only been in town a few days - not like the rest of us. Publicists and hacks alike keep asking me if they look as tired as they feel. I lie and say 'no' trying to keep up people's spirits. But it's obvious it's not going to help. Everyone here needs new livers, a good soak and around 300 hours of sleep. Personally, my caffeine levels are outweighing the rosé, causing me to tremble. I'm lighting up cigarettes before I've even finished the one I'm smoking and that's really not helping. The celebrity-headed hydra of a festival is dying and there are only ...
Article Link:
Popeater article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Leos Carax
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)