Libby Holman
Actress, singer
Libby Holman
Libby Holman was an American torch singer and stage actress who also achieved notoriety for her complex and unconventional personal life.
Biography
Libby Holman's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Libby Holman
News
News abour Libby Holman from around the web
Montgomery Clift - en bortglömd stjärna - Sourze
Google News - over 5 years
I början av 40-talet lärde han känna Libby Holman, en medelålders före detta broadwaystjärna som blev hans lärare och älskarinna. Många kvinnor var galna i honom och han började senare dejta den unga vackra aktrisen Ann Nichols som förblev hans vän
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Google News article
More drug companies close Facebook pages as Walls open - Washington Post
Google News - over 5 years
Spokeswoman Libby Holman said Purdue might reevaluate its decision when the Food and Drug Administration releases guidelines for online engagement. Johnson & Johnson removed four of its pages Monday, as it had said last week that it would
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Google News article
Drug Is Harder to Abuse, but Users Persevere - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Libby Holman, a Purdue Pharma spokeswoman, said that based on initial data and reports, the company is “cautiously optimistic” that the reformulation will eventually prove less susceptible to abuse. But long-term studies will be necessary,
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Google News article
Community Calendar May 19-July 9 - Pomerado Newspaper Group
Google News - almost 6 years
For ticket information, visit www.powayusd.com/teachers/ngray/ or contact Libby Holman at 858-748-0517 or libbyh@sbcglobal.net. PARENT ADVOCATE MEETING – Parent Advocates Seeking Solutions, a support group for parents of children ages 15 and older with
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Google News article
Poway Community Symphony Orchestra to Present Spring Concert - Patch.com
Google News - almost 6 years
To purchase tickets, contact Libby Holman at 858-748-0517 or libbyh@sbcglobal.net. The Xpressive Arts Center will offer a silk painting class on Thursday from 5-7 pm Students will create a silk scarf during the session
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Google News article
Georgia - Yet Another State Dealing With an Epidemic of OxyContin Addiction ... - Salem-News.Com
Google News - almost 6 years
Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin, who lied about the addictive and abusive qualities of the drug and unleashed an unprecedented epidemic of death and addiction throughout the US and Canada, recently had spokeswoman Libby Holman issue a statement
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Google News article
Entertainment Calendar May 12, 2011 - Pomerado Newspaper Group
Google News - almost 6 years
Ticket information at www.powayusd.com/teachers/ngray/ or by contacting Libby Holman at 858-748-0517 or libbyh@sbcglobal.net. The Mt. Carmel High School choirs will be performing their final concert of the year 7 pm Thursday, May 26 and Friday,
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Google News article
Trailing an elusive killer - Atlanta Journal Constitution
Google News - almost 6 years
Purdue Pharma is “open to” working with the state, spokeswoman Libby Holman said. Rep. Tom Weldon, R-Ringgold, helped push the database through the Legislature this year but worries that without funding the idea will wither. “It benefits them to get a
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Google News article
Entertainment Calendar May 5, 2011 - Pomerado Newspaper Group
Google News - almost 6 years
Ticket information at www.powayusd.com/teachers/ngray/ or by contacting Libby Holman at 858-748-0517 or libbyh@sbcglobal.net. The Mt. Carmel High School choirs will be performing their final concert of the year 7 pm Thursday, May 26 and Friday,
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Google News article
U.S. Seeks To Rein In Painkillers
NYTimes - almost 6 years
The Obama administration said on Tuesday that it would seek legislation requiring doctors to undergo training before being permitted to prescribe powerful painkillers like OxyContin, the most aggressive step taken by federal officials to control both the use and abuse of the drugs. In the last decade, the abuse of pain medications like OxyContin
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NYTimes article
MUSIC REVIEW; Keeping Torch Songs Ablaze
NYTimes - over 6 years
Talk about wacky. When Andrea Marcovicci was 5, she recalls, her mother, Helen, a nightclub singer now in her 90s and still active, taught her to sing ''The Man I Love.'' In the Marcovicci home ''Stormy Weather'' was sung as a lullaby. What would that do to an impressionable little girl, you might ask? Decades later Ms. Marcovicci, who turned 62 on
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NYTimes article
ANTIQUES; A Luxe Designer, Restored to Glory
NYTimes - over 6 years
Joseph Urban, the Vienna-born architect and interior and set designer, was so renowned in the 1930s that when he was dying of cancer at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, he checked in as Mr. John Smith to keep away gossipers and stalkers. ''Today, nobody remembers him,'' said Jennifer B. Lee, the performing arts curator at the Rare Book and
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NYTimes article
Big News! Press Agent Gets Name In Lights
NYTimes - over 8 years
The Manhattan Theater Club has announced a new name for its Biltmore Theater. And who will receive that honor, one now shared on Broadway by a select group of people? Maybe a writer, a critic, an actor, a cartoonist? Perhaps an airline or a large multinational bank? Nope. A press agent. At a ceremony sometime before the start of the 2008-9 season,
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; Mining A Rich Vein Of Sequins In Revues
NYTimes - almost 10 years
Encores! has built its own jukebox, and it gleams like gold. ''Stairway to Paradise,'' which runs through Monday at City Center, is an anthology of truly olden oldies, songs the theatergoing masses heard in musical revues in the first half of the 20th century. And yes, I know, it all sounds too quaint and camp and, well, dusty, for words. But the
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NYTimes article
A Book Remembers Forgotten Architects
NYTimes - over 12 years
A NEW encyclopedia, African American Architects: A Biographical Dictionary 1865-1945 (Routledge, $95), profiles 151 mostly unknown practitioners, including nine women. Many spent their professional lives passing for white. Others merged their lives with members of the black aristocracy; William S. Pittman of Dallas, for instance, married Portia
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NYTimes article
In the Region/Connecticut; In Built-Up Greenwich, Subdividing by Nibbling
NYTimes - over 13 years
THE breakup of large estates in Greenwich, a town fiercely protective of its green space, has often been a cause for local consternation, if not outright mourning. But the sales of private parcels from estates or the subdividing of expansive properties have been infrequent events. Recently, however, a combination of factors has created a rising
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NYTimes article
Couple Acquire a Storied Estate In Connecticut for $6.75 Million
NYTimes - over 13 years
Treetops, a storied home on 17 acres near the Greenwich border that was once owned by the torch singer Libby Holman, was bought by a New York couple for $6.75 million this week, land records show. The sale closes a tumultuous chapter in the estate's history by keeping the last remnant of the parcel from being subdivided or developed in the
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NYTimes article
CABARET REVIEW; Popping The Cork On Fizzy Nostalgia
NYTimes - almost 15 years
A peaches-and-cream vision of Broadway's Ziegfeld era in glamorous bloom, KT Sullivan is as airy as a bubble in a glass of pink champagne in her new cabaret show, ''Scandals and Follies,'' at the Oak Room of the Algonquin. Airy, however, does not mean air-headed. That glittering bubble is also a nostalgic crystal ball into which Ms. Sullivan and
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NYTimes article
Commercial Property/Connecticut; 2 Stamford Building Sales Reflect Broader Changes
NYTimes - about 16 years
THE recent sales of two major office buildings in Stamford and of an 80-acre light-manufacturing and office complex on the Norwalk-Westport line are emblematic of the area's maturing market and increased selectivity by huge corporations about property they own, real estate executives say. The Stamford properties that changed hands are First
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Libby Holman
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1971
    Age 66
    On June 18, 1971, Holman was found nearly dead in the front seat of her Rolls Royce by her household staff.
    More Details Hide Details She was taken to the hospital where she died hours later. Holman's death was officially ruled a suicide due to acute carbon monoxide poisoning. In view of her frequent bouts with depression and reported past suicide attempts, none of Holman's friends or relatives was surprised by her death. Holman's papers are at the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center of Boston University. In 2001, a successful effort was made by local citizens to save her Connecticut estate, Treetops, from development. It straddles the border of Stamford and Greenwich. As a result, the pristine grounds were preserved. Treetops is part of the Mianus River State Park, which is overseen by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection. Treetops is located just south of the Mianus River Park. The mansion itself is now in private ownership. The grounds are magnificent and the house has undergone extensive restoration. In 2006, Louis Schanker's art studio, located on a hill overlooking the property, began a new life as the home of the Treetops Chamber Music Society.
  • 1966
    Age 61
    She also was considered never the same after the death of Montgomery Clift in 1966.
    More Details Hide Details Friends said that she lost some of her vitality.
    One of her last performances was at the United Nations in New York in 1966.
    More Details Hide Details She performed her trademark song, "Moanin' Low." For many years, Holman reportedly suffered from depression from the combined effects of the deaths of President Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the recent presidential election loss by Eugene McCarthy, the deaths of young men in the Vietnam War, her anguish over the untimely death of her own son and the illness and rapid deterioration of her friend Jane Bowles.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1959
    Age 54
    In 1959, through the Christopher Reynolds Foundation, she underwrote a trip to India by Martin Luther King, Jr. and his wife, Coretta Scott King, both of whom became close friends with Holman and her husband, Louis Schanker. Holman also contributed to the defense of Dr. Benjamin Spock, the pediatrician and writer arrested for taking part in antiwar demonstrations. Her third and last husband was well known abstract artist/sculptor Louis Schanker. They married on December 27, 1960.
    More Details Hide Details Although Holman did not have to work after her marriage to Reynolds, she never completely gave up her career, continuing to perform and make records.
  • FORTIES
  • 1952
    Age 47
    In 1952 she created the Christopher Reynolds Foundation in his memory.
    More Details Hide Details In the 1950s, Holman worked with her accompanist, Gerold Cook, on researching and rearranging what they called earth music. It was primarily blues and spirituals that were linked to the African American community. Holman had always been involved in what later became known as the Civil rights movement. During World War II, she tried to book shows for the servicemen with her friend, Josh White, but they were turned down on the grounds that "we don’t book mixed company."
  • THIRTIES
  • 1939
    Age 34
    Holman married her second husband, film and stage actor Ralph ("Rafe") Holmes, in March 1939. He was twelve years her junior. She had previously dated his older brother, Phillips Holmes. In 1940, both brothers, who were half-Canadian, joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. Phillips was killed in a collision of two military aircraft on August 12, 1942. When Ralph returned home in August 1945, the marriage quickly soured and they soon separated.
    More Details Hide Details On November 15, 1945, Ralph Holmes was found in his Manhattan apartment, dead of a barbiturate overdose at age 29. Holman adopted two sons, Timmy (born October 18, 1945), and Tony (born May 19, 1947). Her natural son Christopher ("Topper") died on August 7, 1950 after falling while mountain climbing. Holman had given him permission to go mountain climbing with a friend on California's highest peak, Mount Whitney, not knowing that the boys were ill-prepared for the adventure. Both died. Those close to Holman claim she never forgave herself.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1934
    Age 29
    In 1934, Broadway producer Vinton Freedley offered Holman the starring role in the Cole Porter musical Anything Goes, but she declined. A 1933 film, Sing, Sinner, Sing, was loosely based upon the allegations surrounding Reynolds' death.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1933
    Age 28
    Holman gave birth to the couple's child, Christopher Smith "Topper" Reynolds, on January 10, 1933.
    More Details Hide Details Journalist Milt Machlin investigated the death of Smith Reynolds and argued that Reynolds committed suicide. In his account Holman was a victim of the anti-Semitism of local authorities, and the district attorney involved with the case later told Machlin that she was innocent.
  • 1932
    Age 27
    In 1932, during a 21st birthday party Reynolds gave at Reynolda for his friend and flying buddy Charles Gideon Hill, Jr., a first cousin to Reynolds's first wife Anne Ludlow Cannon Reynolds, Holman revealed to her husband that she was pregnant.
    More Details Hide Details A tense argument ensued. Moments later, a shot was heard. Friends discovered Reynolds bleeding and unconscious with a gunshot wound to the head. Authorities initially ruled the shooting a suicide, but a coroner's inquiry ruled it a murder. Holman and Albert Bailey "Ab" Walker, a friend of Reynolds and a supposed lover of Holman, were indicted for murder. Louisa d'Andelot Carpenter paid Holman's $25,000 bail at the Rockingham County Courthouse in Wentworth, North Carolina, with Holman appearing in such a dark dress and heavy veil many bystanders and reporters thought she was black or mixed race. The Reynolds family contacted the local authorities and had the charges dropped for fear of scandal.
  • 1931
    Age 26
    With the persuasion of her former lover, Louisa d'Andelot Carpenter, Holman and Reynolds, who went by his middle name, married on November 29, 1931 in the parlor of a house in Monroe, Michigan.
    More Details Hide Details Reynolds wanted Holman to abandon her acting career, she consented by taking a one-year leave of absence. During this time, however, his conservative family was unable to bear Holman and her group of theater friends, who at her invitation often visited Reynolda, the family estate near Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Accusations and arguments among them were common.
  • 1930
    Age 25
    They met in Baltimore, Maryland in April 1930 after Reynolds saw Holman's performance in a road company staging of the play The Little Show.
    More Details Hide Details Reynolds begged friend Dwight Deere Wiman, who was the show's producer, for an introduction to Holman. Reynolds pursued her all around the world in his plane.
  • 1929
    Age 24
    Her big break came while she was appearing with Clifton Webb and Fred Allen in the 1929 Broadway revue The Little Show, in which she first sang the blues number, "Moanin' Low" by Ralph Rainger, which earned her a dozen curtain calls on opening night, drew raves from the critics and became her signature song.
    More Details Hide Details Also in that show, she sang the Kay Swift and Paul James song, "Can't We Be Friends?" The following year, Holman introduced the Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz standard "Something to Remember You By" in the show Three's a Crowd, which also starred Allen and Webb. Other Broadway appearances included The Garrick Gaieties (1925), Merry-Go-Round (1927), Rainbow (1928), Ned Wayburn's Gambols (1929), Revenge with Music (1934), You Never Know (1938, score by Cole Porter), during which production she had a strong rivalry with the tempestuous Mexican actress Lupe Vélez; and her self-produced one-woman revue Blues, Ballads and Sin-Songs (1954). One of Holman's signature looks was the strapless dress, which she has been credited with having invented, or at least being one of its first high-profile wearers. Holman was married three times, and had a variety of intimate relationships with both men and women throughout her lifetime. Her famous lesbian lovers included the DuPont heiress Louisa d'Andelot Carpenter, actress Jeanne Eagels and modernist writer Jane Bowles. Carpenter was to play a significant part throughout Holman's lifetime. They raised their children and lived together and were openly accepted by their theater companions. She scandalized some by dating much younger men, such as fellow American actor Montgomery Clift, whom she mentored.
  • 1925
    Age 20
    Her Broadway theatre debut was in the play The Sapphire Ring in 1925 at the Selwyn Theatre, which closed after thirteen performances.
    More Details Hide Details She was billed as Elizabeth Holman.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1924
    Age 19
    In the summer of 1924, Holman left for New York City, where she first lived at the Studio Club.
    More Details Hide Details Her first theater job in New York was in the road company of The Fool. Channing Pollock, the writer of The Fool, recognized Holman's talents immediately and advised her to pursue a theatrical career. She followed Pollock's advice and soon became a star. An early stage colleague who became a longtime close friend was future film star Clifton Webb, then a dancer. He gave her the nickname, "The Statue of Libby."
  • 1923
    Age 18
    She graduated from the University of Cincinnati on June 16, 1923, with a Bachelor of Arts degree.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1920
    Age 15
    She graduated from Hughes High School on June 11, 1920, at the age of 16.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1906
    Age 1
    Holman later subtracted two years from her age, insisting she was born in 1906, the year she gave the Social Security Administration as the year of her birth.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1904
    Born
    In 1904, the wealthy family grew destitute after Holman's uncle Ross Holzman embezzled nearly $1 million of their stock brokerage business.
    More Details Hide Details At some point, Alfred changed the family name from Holzman to Holman.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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