Lila Lee
American film actress
Lila Lee
Lila Lee was a prominent screen actress of the early silent film era.
Biography
Lila Lee's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Lila Lee
News
News abour Lila Lee from around the web
Lon Chaney Movie Schedule: THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, TELL IT TO THE MARINES ... - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Lon Chaney, Lila Lee, Elliott Nugent. BW-72 mins. 9:00 AM OLIVER TWIST (1922) A young orphan falls in with a man training children to be thieves. Dir: Frank Lloyd. Cast: Jackie Coogan, Lon Chaney, Gladys Brockwell. BW-74 mins
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Google News article
Fink's Y-City HOG Chapter raises $1600 - Zanesville Times Recorder
Google News - over 5 years
┬╗The winners of the raffle during the Frazeysburg Homecoming are: $300 gas card, Janelle Osborn; $200 gas card, David E. Hindel; and $100 gas card, Lila Lee Robinson. Jean Green won the half and half, Eric Lawler won the flower pot tree and Cheryl Back
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Google News article
Lila Emrich - Maryville Daily Forum
Google News - over 5 years
Lila Lee Schaaf), age 79, died June 9, 2011 following a lengthy battle with cancer. Born in a small Missouri town, Lila graduated from Stanberry High School in 1949 then moved to St. Joseph to work as a secretary. In 1951 she married her high school
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Google News article
BLOOD AND SAND Review - Rudolph Valentino, Nita Naldi, Lila Lee - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
After he finds fame in the bull ring, Gallardo marries his sweetheart, Carmen (Lila Lee). He seems to be on the road to happiness. At home, Gallardo supports his mother (Rosa Rosanova), sister Encarnacion (Rosita Marstini), brother-in-law Antonio (Leo
Article Link:
Google News article
Adolph J. Vopat - Ellsworth Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Mr. Vopat is survived by his wife, Lila Lee Vopat; one son, Tom Vopat and wife Christy, of Leawood; one daughter, Linde Vopat, of Kansas City, Mo.; and two grandchildren. Visitation will be from 8 am to 6 pm Friday, May 27, at Foster Mortuary, Wilson
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Google News article
What's On Tonight
NYTimes - over 9 years
6 A.M. (TCM) FLIGHT (1929) Turner Classic Movies devotes 24 hours to aeronautics, starting with Jack Holt, Lila Lee and Ralph Graves in this early Frank Capra film about marine aviators competing for the love of a nurse in Nicaragua. Highlights include Howard Hawks's ''Flight Commander'' (1930), with Douglas Fairbanks Jr., at 8; Glenn Ford in
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NYTimes article
FILM REVIEW; Losing Job and Girlfriend But Gaining Burglar Buddy
NYTimes - about 14 years
James Kirkwood Jr., who died in 1989, will probably be best remembered for the book of ''A Chorus Line,'' but he also wrote several other novels and plays about the agonies of a show business life -- a subject he knew from childhood on, being the son of the silent film stars James Kirkwood and Lila Lee. Among Kirkwood's plays is the 1975 ''P.S.
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NYTimes article
The Way We Live Now: On Language; Clueless
NYTimes - over 15 years
Given my job at The Times, I seem to be perceived by some people as a superintelligent know-it-all who takes delight in tormenting them. Thus, it is understandable that some might take pleasure in exacting revenge by pointing out my own lapses -- mistakes that I've made or permitted to appear in the puzzles. Of all my mail, the largest portion is
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NYTimes article
FILM REVIEW; A Female Vampire Wins Another Stab at Immortality
NYTimes - over 15 years
''Today, as every day, I'm gonna speak about Good and Evil,'' a character known as the Reverend (Richard Blackburn) preaches from his pulpit in ''Lemora, Lady Dracula,'' an ambitious no-budget horror film from 1973 that has been unjustly rescued from its Crypt of Oblivion. After a storied, botched release, the picture, written and directed by Mr.
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NYTimes article
Sybil Trent, 73, a Famous Voice From the Golden Age of Radio
NYTimes - over 16 years
Sybil Trent, a veteran of the golden age of radio and a star of the Saturday-morning children's radio show ''Let's Pretend,'' died on Monday at her home in Manhattan. She was 73. The cause was lymphoma, said her son Drew Nieporent, the restaurateur. Ms. Trent's voice was first heard on ''Let's Pretend'' in 1935, not long after she made her Broadway
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NYTimes article
WEDDINGS; Andrei Saunders, Carolyn Kennedy
NYTimes - over 17 years
Carolyn Hutton Kennedy, a daughter of Lila Lee Dowd of Los Angeles and the late Timothy F. Kennedy, was married yesterday to Andrei Michael George Saunders, the son of Barbara Munroe of Brooklyn and Carlton Saunders of Kingston, Jamaica. The Rev. Dr. Thomas L. Robinson, a minister of the Church of Christ, performed the ceremony at the Rollins
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NYTimes article
At the Movies
NYTimes - over 25 years
Robert Klane's 'Folks' One day, not long after his screenplay for "Weekend at Bernie's" had been transformed into a zany 1989 comedy, Robert Klane went to lunch with its producer, Victor Drai, and its director, Ted Kotcheff. Mr. Klane likes to write novels as well as screenplays. In fact, it was his novel "Where's Poppa?" that took him from New
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NYTimes article
For Richmond's Confederate Home for Women, It's Finally Appomattox
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: One day after a Federal judge rejected a request for an injunction, seven daughters and granddaughters of Confederate soldiers were moved Wednesday from the Confederate Home for Women to a new health care center. One day after a Federal judge rejected a request for an injunction, seven daughters and granddaughters of Confederate soldiers were
Article Link:
NYTimes article
James Kirkwood, Author of Book For Musical 'Chorus Line,' Dies
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: James Kirkwood, a novelist, actor and playwright who was a co-author of the book for the Broadway musical ''A Chorus Line,'' died yesterday in his apartment in Manhattan. James Kirkwood, a novelist, actor and playwright who was a co-author of the book for the Broadway musical ''A Chorus Line,'' died yesterday in his apartment in Manhattan.
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NYTimes article
KIRKWOOD'S 'PONY!' GALLOPS OFFSTAGE
NYTimes - over 34 years
EAST HAMPTON THERE might be a play in ''There Must Be a Pony!'' but James Kirkwood hasn't written it. More likely, there's a movie in it. The most dramatic, comic and tender scenes at the John Drew Theater happen offstage - and cry out for the camera. What we know for sure is that Mr. Kirkwood wrote ''There Must Be a Pony!'' - which runs through
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NYTimes article
AT THE MOVIES; Actor turned writer turns into director.
NYTimes - over 34 years
JAMES KIRKWOOD, who shared a 1976 Pulitzer Prize for writing the book of ''A Chorus Line'' and who wrote the screenplay for Richard Pryor's movie ''Some Kind of Hero,'' is set to make his moviedirecting debut with a thriller called ''Crooked Tree.'' It's about an Indian woman who's inhabited by the spirit of a medicine man and who - unconsciously -
Article Link:
NYTimes article
BROADWAY; Elizabeth Taylor's 'Sweet Bird' is due in April.
NYTimes - over 34 years
THEY scoffed when Zev Bufman said he would produce plays with, and starring, Elizabeth Taylor; they said it would never happen. ''The Little Foxes'' was one thing, but ''Sweet Bird of Youth'' - a chimera and a dream, or, if you will, just another hype. But now there is the Elizabeth Theater Company, with Miss Taylor as co-producer and resident
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lila Lee
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1973
    Age 71
    In 1973 Lee died of a stroke at Saranac Lake.
    More Details Hide Details For her contribution as an actress in motion pictures, she was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1716 Vine Street.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1931
    Age 29
    The marriage ended in August 1931 on grounds of her desertion.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1924
    Age 22
    Lee and Kirkwood had a son in 1924, James Kirkwood, Jr., whose custody was granted to his father; he became a highly regarded playwright and screenwriter whose works include A Chorus Line and P.S. Your Cat Is Dead.
    More Details Hide Details Her second husband was broker Jack R. Peine (married 1934, divorced 1935) and her third husband was broker John E. Murphy (married 1944, divorced 1949). According to author Sean Egan in the James Kirkwood biography Ponies & Rainbows (2011), Murphy's will left Lee at the financial mercy of his second wife, who consequently became the manipulative character Aunt Claire in P.S. Your Cat Is Dead, written by Lee's son, James Kirkwood, Jr. In the 1930s she diagnosed with tuberculosis and moved to Saranac Lake, New York for treatment at the Will Rogers Memorial Hospital. Lee made several uneventful appearances in stage plays in the 1940s, and starred in early television soap operas in the 1950s.
  • 1923
    Age 21
    Lee was married and divorced three times. Her first husband was actor James Kirkwood, Sr., whom she married in 1923.
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  • 1922
    Age 20
    In 1922 Lee was cast as Carmen in the enormously popular film Blood and Sand, opposite matinee idol Rudolph Valentino and silent screen vamp Nita Naldi; Lee subsequently won the first WAMPAS Baby Stars award that year.
    More Details Hide Details Lee continued to be a highly popular leading lady throughout the 1920s and made scores of critically praised and widely watched films. As the Roaring Twenties drew to a close, Lee's popularity began to wane and Lee positioned herself for the transition to talkies. She is one of the few leading ladies of the silent screen whose popularity did not nosedive with the coming of sound. She went back to working with the major studios and appeared, most notably, in The Unholy Three, in 1930, opposite Lon Chaney Sr. in his only talkie. However, a series of bad career choices and bouts of recurring tuberculosis and alcoholism hindered further projects and Lee was relegated to taking parts in mostly grade B-movies.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1918
    Age 16
    In 1918, she was chosen for a film contract by Hollywood film mogul Jesse Lasky for Famous Players-Lasky Corporation, which later became Paramount Pictures.
    More Details Hide Details Her first feature The Cruise of the Make-Believes garnered the seventeen-year-old starlet much public acclaim and Lasky quickly sent Lee on an arduous publicity campaign. Critics lauded Lila for her wholesome persona and sympathetic character parts. Lee quickly rose to the ranks of leading lady and often starred opposite such matinee heavies as Conrad Nagel, Gloria Swanson, Wallace Reid, Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, and Rudolph Valentino. Lee bore more than a slight resemblance to Ann Little, a former Paramount star and frequent Reid co-star who was leaving the film business and at this stage in her career an even stronger resemblance to Marguerite Clark.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1901
    Born
    Born in 1901.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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