Linda Ronstadt
American singer
Linda Ronstadt
Linda Marie Ronstadt is an American popular music recording artist. She has earned eleven Grammy Awards, two Academy of Country Music awards, an Emmy Award, an ALMA Award, numerous United States and internationally certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, in addition to Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. A singer, songwriter, and record producer, she is recognized as a definitive interpreter of songs.
Biography
Linda Ronstadt's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Linda Ronstadt from around the web
The Eagles' '<em>Hotel California</em>' at 40, '<em>Buffalo Springfield</em>' at 50
Huffington Post - 2 months
Quick, what is the state anthem of California? If you answer 'California, Here I Come,' you are, like me, wrong. If your answer is 'I Love You, California,' you are an unusually well-informed career state employee. And if, like billions of people around the world, you answer 'Hotel California,' well, you are technically wrong but, oh so right. This month marks the 40th anniversary of the release of 'Hotel California,' both the song and the album it graces which is one of the most telling, and best-selling, albums of all time. The power and mystery of 'Hotel California' has tantalized and inspired, provoked and mystified ever since its exotic and evocative guitar figures and enigmatic lyrics were first heard 40 years ago. "It makes me want to go there and it makes me want to get away," said one tourist standing near a California street corner as a singer with a guitar gave the song a go. "Look at me," she said. "Here I am." December also marks the 50th anniversary of 'Buffal ...
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Huffington Post article
Don Henley, Jackson Browne and friends salute Linda Ronstadt at Parkinson's benefit
LATimes - 2 months
Fans and pop music critics alike have long extolled the power of Linda Ronstadt’s voice. But the facet of her talent most consistently lauded Sunday night at the Theatre at Ace Hotel in L.A. during a star-studded salute to Ronstadt benefiting research into Parkinson’s disease was her ears. That...
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LATimes article
Hillary Clinton Is Seen In The Woods So Often, Twitter Thinks She Lives There
Huffington Post - 3 months
Twitter is Hillary-ious. Due to the multiple times Hillary Clinton has been seen hiking through the woods since the election, like in this picture … Hillary Clinton spotted again in the woods walking trails —via @pantsuitnation pic.twitter.com/LZ24IQwVE2 — Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) November 26, 2016 ... and in these photos … If you walk into the woods and say her name three times, Hillary Clinton will appear for a selfie and some encouraging words. pic.twitter.com/ffgFO04LkF — michael brown (@boyinquestion) November 29, 2016 … people on Twitter are joking that the former Democratic presidential nominee is clearly living in the forest like some majestic woodland creature: *runs into the woods in search of Hillary Clinton* — Gabe Ortíz (@TUSK81) November 29, 2016 Hillary Clinton Spotted in Woods a Third time, stole hiker's cellphone screaming 'not again this story is not going to happen again' — Spencer (@Thesix ...
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Huffington Post article
Emmylou, Dolly and Linda: Trio Returns For One Sweet and Welcome Last Roundup
The Huffington Post - 5 months
The re-release of the 1986 and 1994 Trio sessions, a collaboration of Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt, is almost certainly the best Americana record coming out this fall. More...
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The Huffington Post article
Fallen Eagle: Glenn Frey's Untimely Passing Points Up a <em>Long Run</em> Era
Huffington Post - about 1 year
The song from the car speakers sounded out sharp and vibrant and lilting across my high school parking lot. So much so I found myself sprinting across the lot, shouting at the parking driver not to turn off his radio. "What song, what band?," I asked. The disc jockey provided the answer at song's end; it was Take It Easy by a new band called the Eagles. The singer, I would soon find out along with much more as the '70s and '80s unfolded, was Glenn Frey. Fast forward to this MLK Day. I went online that afternoon to check on the latest polls in our rather alarming presidential race for a forthcoming piece, only to learn that Glenn Frey had suddenly passed away. It was quick a shock, since he was only 67 and he and the rest of the Eagles have regularly been touring the world for years, looking good and sounding great, a long run which, given the band's great popularity, I expected to continue for a long time to come. A lot has happened in the 40-odd years since I first dashed to hear ...
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Huffington Post article
Linda Ronstadt, whose backing band was the hub for the Eagles, remembers Glenn Frey - Los Angeles Times
Google News - about 1 year
Los Angeles Times Linda Ronstadt, whose backing band was the hub for the Eagles, remembers Glenn Frey Los Angeles Times No one ever suggested that the Eagles invented country-rock music. The seeds for that hybrid had been planted and nurtured in the mid-1960s by the likes of the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Linda Ronstadt and the Monkees ... 'Jihadi John' dead; Winslow, Ariz., remembers Glenn Frey (10 things to know for Wednesday)NOLA.com Why The Deaths Of All These Musical Legends Are Getting To UsHuffington Post Glenn Frey and That Peaceful, Queasy FeelingThe New Yorker Miami Herald -People Magazine all 999 news articles »
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Google News article
Linda Ronstadt, whose backing band was the hub for the Eagles, remembers Glenn Frey
LATimes - about 1 year
No one ever suggested that the Eagles invented country-rock music. The seeds for that hybrid had been planted and nurtured in the mid-1960s by the likes of the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Linda Ronstadt and the Monkees' Michael Nesmith well before Glenn Frey came together...
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LATimes article
A Most Ingenious Paradox
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Many opera companies have experimented with updating works from the standard repertoire in order to make them more relevant to contemporary audiences. Why? Doing so has financial as well as artistic rewards (because the scores to many operas are now in the public domain, an impresario may not need to pay royalties in order to be granted production rights). In 1866, Gaetano Donizetti's 1832 opera, The Elixir of Love, became the subject of a musical parody written by none other than William S. Gilbert, entitled Dulcamara, or the Little Duck and the Great Quack. In the 1980s, James De Blasis used a new translation of Felice Romani's libretto for an updated version of Elixir of Love that was set in the Wild West and has occasionally been referred to as "Adina Get Your Gun." In 2012, tenor Rolando Villazòn sang the role of Nemorino and directed a new "Wild West" production of Donizetti's opera at the Festspielhaus Baden-Baden. The San Francisco Opera recently scored ...
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Huffington Post article
Remembering Judee Sill: A Mystic Walked Among Us
Huffington Post - over 1 year
A selfish motivation is the genesis lurking behind the creation of this post. Simply put, this writer feels oddly compelled to add to the emerging canon of articles and documentaries about the late singer/songwriter Judee Sill. Sometimes a story idea will haunt the writer until it is completed. Sill described herself as a "genderless angel." The patina of years has me convinced that Judee Sill, if not an angel, was truly a mystic walking in our midst, and we all overlooked that fact. Certainly the music business did. She wrote as if she were not part of this earthly plane; inhabiting exploding star clusters while riding ten crested cardinals and enchanted sky machines. Who could write like that if they were not exquisitely aware of something beyond, something extraordinary, and something worth the telling? For Sill, it was November of 1979 and not T.S. Eliot's April that was the cruelest month. She passed at the age of 35 of a drug overdose. This fascination with Judee Sill be ...
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Huffington Post article
An 8-Point Plan to Repair the US-Mexico Border
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Ten years ago, in 2005, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security introduced its Secure Border Initiative (SBI). Today, the Mexico-U.S. wall is a fact of everyday life for millions of people who live in its shadow. Disagreements persist about how effective the border fortifications have been, but two outcomes are certain: the SBI intervention has massively disrupted community, commerce, and environment along the border zone; and created a bloated 'border industrial complex,' consisting of surveillance infrastructures and enforcement personnel that intervene in the lives of U.S. citizens even though they are intended to target undocumented migrants, smugglers, and terrorists. During the entire SBI decade there has been little or no evidence that the plight of border dwellers is of much concern to federal governments in Washington, D.C. and Mexico City, where the legal authority (and responsibility) for immigration, customs, and national security resides. In the U.S., popular co ...
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Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Linda Ronstadt
    FORTIES
  • 2014
    On July 28, 2014, she was awarded the National Medal of Arts and Humanities.
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    She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April 2014.
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  • 2013
    Her autobiography, Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir, was published in September 2013.
    More Details Hide Details It debuted in the Top 10 on the New York Times Best Sellers List. Ronstadt has collaborated with artists in diverse genres, including Bette Midler, Billy Eckstine, Frank Zappa, Rosemary Clooney, Flaco Jiménez, Philip Glass, Warren Zevon, Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons, Dolly Parton, Neil Young, Johnny Cash, and Nelson Riddle. She has lent her voice to over 120 albums and has sold more than 100 million records, making her one of the world's best-selling artists of all time. Christopher Loudon, of Jazz Times, wrote in 2004 that Ronstadt is "blessed with arguably the most sterling set of pipes of her generation."
    In August 2013, Ronstadt revealed she has Parkinson's disease, leaving her unable to sing due to loss of muscle control, which is common to Parkinson's patients.
    More Details Hide Details She was diagnosed eight months prior to the announcement and had initially attributed the symptoms she had been experiencing to the after effects of shoulder surgery and a tick bite. Ronstadt self-identifies as a spiritual atheist.
    In August 2013, she revealed to AARP that she has Parkinson's disease, and "can no longer sing a note."
    More Details Hide Details Beginning in the mid-1970s, Ronstadt's private life became increasingly public. It was fueled by a relationship with then - Governor of California Jerry Brown, a Democratic presidential candidate. They shared a Newsweek magazine cover in April 1979. Us Weekly magazine put them on its cover. Ronstadt and Brown took a trip to Africa which became fodder for the international press, and People magazine put them on its cover.
  • 2012
    It was the last time Linda Ronstadt would record an album, having begun to lose her singing ability as the result of Parkinson's disease, diagnosed in December 2012.
    More Details Hide Details Adieu False Heart, recorded in Louisiana, features a cast of local musicians, including Chas Justus, Eric Frey and Kevin Wimmer of the Red Stick Ramblers, Sam Broussard of the Mamou Playboys, Dirk Powell, and Joel Savoy, as well as an array of Nashville musicians: fiddler Stuart Duncan, mandolinist Sam Bush, and guitarist Bryan Sutton. The recording earned two Grammy Award nominations: Best Traditional Folk Album and Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical. In 2007, Ronstadt could be heard on the compilation album We All Love Ella: Celebrating the First Lady of Songa tribute album to jazz music's all-time most heralded artiston the track "Miss Otis Regrets".
    She was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease in December 2012, which left her unable to sing.
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  • 2011
    In the summer of 2011, Simon & Schuster announced their publishing of Ronstadt's autobiography.
    More Details Hide Details Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir, and the Spanish version Sueños SencillosMemorias Musicales was released on September 17, 2013.
    In 2011, Ronstadt was interviewed by the Arizona Daily Star and announced her retirement.
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    Asher executive produced a tribute CD called Listen to Me: Buddy Holly, released September 6, 2011, on which Ronstadt's 1976 version of Buddy Holly's "That'll Be The Day" appears among newly recorded versions of Holly's songs by various artists.
    More Details Hide Details box Mexican music also has an overlay of West African music, based on huapango drums, and it's kind of like a 6/8 time signature, but it really is a very syncopated 6/8. Ronstadt captured the sounds of country music and the rhythms of ranchera musicwhich she likened in 1968 to "Mexican bluegrass"and redirected them into her rock 'n' roll and some of her pop music. Many of these rhythms and sounds were part of her Southwestern roots. Likewise, a country sound and style, a fusion of country music and rock 'n' roll called Country rock, started to exert its influence on mainstream pop music around the late 1960s, and it became an emerging movement Ronstadt helped form and commercialize. However, as early as 1970, Ronstadt was being criticized by music "purists" for her "brand of music" which crossed many genres. Country Western Stars magazine wrote in 1970 that "Rock people thought she was too gentle, folk people thought she was too pop, and pop people didn't quite understand where she was at, but Country people really loved Linda." She never categorized herself and stuck to her genre-crossing brand of music.
    She continued to tour, collaborate, and record celebrated albums, such as Winter Light and Hummin' to Myself, until her retirement in 2011.
    More Details Hide Details Most of Ronstadt's albums are certified gold, platinum, or multi-platinum. Having sold in excess of 100 million records worldwide and setting records as one of the top-grossing concert performers for over a decade, Ronstadt was the most successful female singer of the 1970s and stands as one of the most successful female recording artists in U.S. history. A consummate American artist, Ronstadt opened many doors for women in rock and roll and other musical genres by championing songwriters and musicians, pioneering her chart success onto the concert circuit, and being at the vanguard of many musical movements. box It just is my rule that I don't break because... I can't do it authentically... Ronstadt's early family life was filled with music and tradition, which influenced the stylistic and musical choices she later made in her career. Growing up, she listened to many types of music, including Mexican music, which was sung by her entire family and was a staple in her childhood.
  • 2010
    On April 29, 2010, Ronstadt began a campaign, including joining a lawsuit, against Arizona's new illegal-immigration law SB 1070 calling it a "devastating blow to law enforcement... the police don't protect us in a democracy with brute force", something she said she learned from her brother, Peter, who was Chief of Police in Tucson.
    More Details Hide Details Ronstadt has also been outspoken on environmental and community issues. She is a major supporter and admirer of sustainable agriculture pioneer Wes Jackson, saying in 2000 that "the work he's doing right now is the most important work there is in the (United States)", and dedicating the rock anthem "Desperado" to him at an August 2007 concert in Kansas City, Kansas.
    On January 16, 2010, Ronstadt converged with thousands of other activists in a "National Day of Action".
    More Details Hide Details Ronstadt stated that her "dog in the fight"as a native Arizonan and coming from a law enforcement familywas the treatment of illegal aliens and Arizona's enforcement of its illegal immigrant law, especially Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio's immigration efforts.
    In 2010, Ronstadt contributed the arrangement and lead vocal to "A La Orilla de un Palmar" on the Chieftains studio album San Patricio (with Ry Cooder).
    More Details Hide Details This remains her most recent commercially available recording as lead vocalist.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2009
    In August 2009, Ronstadt, in a well-publicized interview to PlanetOut Inc. titled "Linda Ronstadt's Gay Mission", championed gay rights and same-sex marriage and stated that "homophobia is anti-family values.
    More Details Hide Details Period, end of story."
    In May 2009, Ronstadt received an honorary doctorate of music degree from the Berklee College of Music for her achievements and influence in music, and her contributions to American and international culture.
    More Details Hide Details Mix magazine stated that "Linda Ronstadt (has) left her mark on more than the record business; her devotion to the craft of singing influenced many audio professionals... (and is) intensely knowledgeable about the mechanics of singing and the cultural contexts of every genre she passes". In 2004, Ronstadt wrote the foreword to the book The NPR Curious Listener's Guide to American Folk Music, and in 2005, she wrote the introduction to the book Classic Ferrington Guitars, about guitar-maker and luthier Danny Ferrington and the custom guitars that he created for Ronstadt and other musicians such as Elvis Costello, Ry Cooder, and Kurt Cobain.
    On March 31, 2009, in testimony that the Los Angeles Times viewed as "remarkable", Ronstadt spoke to the United States Congress House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment & Related Agencies, attempting to convince lawmakers to budget $200 million in the 2010 fiscal year for the National Endowment of the Arts.
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    In 2009, in honor of Ronstadt, the Martin Guitar Company made a 00 - 42 model "Linda Ronstadt Limited Edition" acoustic guitar.
    More Details Hide Details Ronstadt appointed the Land Institute as recipient of all proceeds from her signature guitar.
    After completing her last live concert in late 2009, Ronstadt retired in 2011.
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  • 2008
    On August 17, 2008, Ronstadt received a tribute by various artists including BeBe Winans and Wynonna Judd, when she was honored with the Trailblazer Award, presented to her by Plácido Domingo at the 2008 ALMA Awards, a ceremony later televised in the U.S. on ABC.
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  • 2007
    Ronstadt has also been honored for her contribution to the American arts. On September 23, 2007, Ronstadt was inducted into the Arizona Music & Entertainment Hall of Fame, along with Stevie Nicks, Buck Owens, and filmmaker Steven Spielberg.
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    In 2007, Ronstadt resided in San Francisco while also maintaining her home in Tucson.
    More Details Hide Details That same year, she drew criticism and praise from Tucsonans for commenting that the local city council's failings, developers' strip mall mentality, greed, and growing dust problem had rendered the city unrecognizable and poorly developed. box In 2008, Ronstadt was appointed Artistic Director of the San José Mariachi and Mexican Heritage Festival.
    In an August 14, 2007, interview, she commented on all her well-publicized, outspoken views, in particular the Aladdin incident by noting, "If I had it to do over I would be much more gracious to everyone … you can be as outspoken as you want if you are very, very respectful.
    More Details Hide Details Show some grace".
    In the summer of 2007, Ronstadt headlined the Newport Folk Festival, making her debut at this event, where she incorporated jazz, rock, and folk music into her repertoire.
    More Details Hide Details It was one of her final concerts.
  • 2006
    At a 2006 concert in Canada, Ronstadt told the Calgary Sun that she was "embarrassed George Bush (was) from the United States....
    More Details Hide Details He's an idiot. He's enormously incompetent on both the domestic and international scenes.... Now the fact that we were lied to about the reasons for entering into war against Iraq and thousands of people have diedit's just as immoral as racism." Her remarks drew international headlines.
  • 2004
    Amid reports of mixed public response, Ronstadt continued in her praise of Moore and his film throughout her 2004 and 2006 summer concerts across North America.
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    Ronstadt's politics received criticism and praise during and after her July 17, 2004, performance at the Aladdin Theatre for the Performing Arts in Las Vegas.
    More Details Hide Details Toward the end of the show, as she had done across the country, Ronstadt spoke to the audience, praising Fahrenheit 9/11, Michael Moore's documentary film about the Iraq War; she dedicated the song "Desperado" to Moore. Accounts say the crowd's initial reaction was mixed, with "half the crowd heartily applauding her praise for Moore, (and) the other half booing." Following the concert, news accounts reported that Ronstadt was "evicted" from the hotel premises. Ronstadt's comments, as well as the reactions of some audience members and the hotel, became a topic of discussion nationwide. Aladdin casino president Bill Timmins and Michael Moore each made public statements on the controversy. The incident prompted international headlines and debate on an entertainer's right to express a political opinion from the stage, and made the editorial section of The New York Times. Following the incident, many friends of Ronstadt's, including the Eagles, immediately cancelled their engagements at the Aladdin. Ronstadt also received telegrams of support from her rock 'n' roll friends around the world, such as the Rolling Stones, the Eagles, and Elton John.
  • 2000
    In 2000, Ronstadt completed her long contractual relationship with the Elektra/Asylum label.
    More Details Hide Details The fulfillment of this contract commenced with the release of A Merry Little Christmas, her first holiday collection, which includes rare choral works, the somber Joni Mitchell song "River", and a rare recorded duet with the late Rosemary Clooney on Clooney's signature song, "White Christmas". Since leaving Warner Music, Ronstadt has gone on to release one album each under Verve and Vanguard Records. box In 2006, recording as the ZoZo Sisters, Ronstadt teamed with her new friend, musician and musical scholar Ann Savoy, to record Adieu False Heart. It was an album of roots music incorporating pop, Cajun, and early-20th-century music and released on the Vanguard Records label. But Adieu False Heart was a commercial failure, peaking at number 146 in the U.S. despite her touring for the final time that year.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1999
    Also in 1999, Ronstadt went back to her concert roots, when she performed with the Eagles and Jackson Browne at Staples Center's 1999 New Year's Eve celebration kicking off the December 31 end-of-the-millennium festivities.
    More Details Hide Details As Staples Center Senior Vice President and General Manager Bobby Goldwater said, "It was our goal to present a spectacular event as a sendoff to the 20th century", and "Eagles, Jackson Browne, and Linda Ronstadt are three of the most popular acts of the century. Their performances will constitute a singular and historic night of entertainment for New Year's Eve in Los Angeles."
    Despite the lack of success of We Ran, Ronstadt kept moving towards this adult rock exploration. In the summer of 1999, she released the album Western Wall: The Tucson Sessions, a folk-rock-oriented project with EmmyLou Harris.
    More Details Hide Details It earned a nomination for the Grammy Award for the Best Contemporary Folk Album, and made the Top 10 of Billboards Country Albums chart (number 73 on the main Billboard album chart). However, it would sell roughly half the number of copies that Trio II sold and had gone out of print as of December 2010.
  • 1998
    In 1998, Ronstadt released We Ran, her first album in over two years.
    More Details Hide Details The album harkened back to Ronstadt's country-rock and folk-rock heyday. She returned to her rock 'n' roll roots with vivid interpretations of songs by Bruce Springsteen, Doc Pomus, Bob Dylan, and John Hiatt. The recording was produced by Glyn Johns. A commercial failure, the album standsat 60,000 copies sold at the time of its deletion in 2008as the poorest-selling studio album in Ronstadt's Elektra/Asylum catalog. We Ran did not chart any singles but it was well received by critics.
  • 1996
    In 1996, Ronstadt produced Dedicated to the One I Love, an album of classic rock and roll songs reinvented as lullabies.
    More Details Hide Details The album reached number 78 in Billboard and won the Grammy Award for Best Musical Album for Children.
  • 1993
    Ronstadt was nominated for three Lo Nuestro Awards in 1993: Female Regional Mexican Artist of the Year, Female Tropical/Salsa Artist of the Year, and her version of the song "Perfidia" was also listed for Tropical/Salsa Song of the Year.
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    Continuing with her crafted approach to more mainstream-oriented material, Ronstadt released the highly acclaimed Winter Light album at the end of 1993.
    More Details Hide Details It includes New Age arrangements such as the lead single "Heartbeats Accelerating" as well as the self-penned title track and features the unique glass harmonica instrument. It was her first commercial failure since 1972, and peaked at number 92 in Billboard, whereas 1995's Feels Like Home was Ronstadt's much heralded return to country-rock and included her version of Tom Petty's classic hit "The Waiting". The single's rollicking, fiddle-infused flip side, "Walk On", returned Ronstadt to the Country Singles chart for the first time since 1983. An album track entitled "The Blue Train" charted 10 weeks in Billboards Adult Contemporary Top 40. This album fared slightly better than its predecessor, reaching number 75. Both albums were later deleted from the Elektra/Asylum catalog.
  • 1990
    In December 1990, she participated in a concert held at the Tokyo Dome to commemorate John Lennon's 50th birthday, and to raise awareness of environmental issues.
    More Details Hide Details Other participants included Miles Davis, Lenny Kravitz, Hall & Oates, Natalie Cole, Yoko Ono, and Sean Lennon. An album resulted, titled Happy Birthday, John.
    Ronstadt's last known live Grammy Award appearance was in 1990 when she and Neville performed "Don't Know Much" together on the telecast. ("Whenever I sing with a different artist, I can get things out of my voice that I can't do by myself", Ronstadt reflected in 2007. "I can do things with Aaron that I can't do alone.")
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1989
    In 1989, Ronstadt released a mainstream pop album and several popular singles.
    More Details Hide Details This effort, titled Cry Like A Rainstorm, Howl Like The Wind, became one of the singer's most successful albumsin terms of production, arrangements, chart sales, and critical acclaim. It became Ronstadt's tenth Top 10 album on the Billboard chart, reaching number 7 and being certified triple-platinum (over three million copies sold in the U.S.). The album also garnered critical acclaim, receiving numerous Grammy Award nominations and being praised by Amazon.com as "an album that defines virtually everything that is right about adult contemporary pop." Ronstadt featured New Orleans soul singer Aaron Neville on several of the album's songs. Ronstadt incorporated the sounds of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, Tower of Power horns, the Skywalker Symphony, and numerous musicians. It had the duets with Aaron Neville, "Don't Know Much" (Billboard Hot 100 number 2 hit, Christmas 1989) and "All My Life" (Billboard Hot 100 number 11 hit), both of which were long-running number 1 Adult Contemporary hits. The duets earned several Grammy Award nominations. The duo won both the 1989 and 1990 Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal awards.
  • 1988
    In 1988, Ronstadt would return to Broadway for a limited-run engagement in the musical show adaptation of her album celebrating her Mexican heritage, Canciones De Mi PadreA Romantic Evening in Old Mexico.
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  • 1987
    In 1987, she made a return to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart with "Somewhere Out There", which peaked at number 2 in March.
    More Details Hide Details Featured in the animated film An American Tail, the sentimental duet with James Ingram was nominated for several Grammy Awards, ultimately winning the Grammy Award for Song of the Year. The song also received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Original Song and achieved high sales, earning a million-selling gold single in the U.S.one of the last 45s ever to do so. It was also accompanied by a popular music video. On the heels of this success, Steven Spielberg asked Ronstadt to record the theme song for the animated sequel titled An American Tail: Fievel Goes West, which was titled "Dreams To Dream". Although "Dreams To Dream" failed to achieve the success of "Somewhere Out There", the song did give Ronstadt an Adult Contemporary hit in 1991.
    At the end of 1987, Ronstadt released Canciones de Mi Padre, an album of traditional Mexican folk songs, or what she has described as "world class songs".
    More Details Hide Details Keeping with the Ronstadt history theme, her cover art was dramatic, bold, and colorful; it shows Ronstadt in full Mexican regalia. Her musical arranger was mariachi musician Rubén Fuentes. These canciones were a big part of Ronstadt's family tradition and musical roots. For example, the history of this album goes back half a century. In January 1946, the University of Arizona published a booklet by Luisa Espinel entitled Canciones de mi Padre. Luisa Espinel, Ronstadt's aunt, was herself an international singer in the 1920s and 1930s. Espinel's father was Fred Ronstadt, Linda's grandfather, and the songs she had learned, transcribed, and published were some of the ones he had brought with him from Sonora. Ronstadt researched and extracted from the favorites she had learned from her father Gilbert and she called her album by the same name as her aunt's booklet and as a tribute to her father and his family. Though not fully bilingual, she has a fairly good command of the Spanish language, allowing her to sing Latin American songs with little discernible U.S. accent; Ronstadt has often identified herself as Mexican-American. Her formative years were spent with her father's side of the family. In fact, in 1976, Ronstadt had collaborated with her father to write and compose a traditional Mexican folk ballad, "Lo siento mi vida"a song that she included in her Grammy Award-winning album Hasten Down the Wind.
  • 1984
    In 1984, Ronstadt and Riddle performed these songs live, in concert halls throughout Australia, Japan, and the United States, including multi-night performances at historic venues Carnegie Hall, Radio City Music Hall, and Pine Knob.
    More Details Hide Details In 2004, Ronstadt released Hummin' to Myself, her album for Verve Records. It was her first foray into traditional jazz since her sessions with Jerry Wexler and her records with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, but this time with an intimate jazz combo. The album was a quiet affair for Ronstadt, giving few interviews and making only one television performance as promotion. It reached number 2 on Billboard's Top Jazz Albums chart but peaked at number 166 on the main Billboard album chart. Not having the mass distribution that Warner Music Group gave her, Hummin' To Myself had sold over 75,000 copies in the U.S. as of 2010. It also achieved some critical acclaim from the jazz cognoscenti. box In 1978, Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, and Emmylou Harris, friends and admirers of one another's work (Ronstadt had included a cover of Parton's "I Will Always Love You" on Prisoner in Disguise) attempted to collaborate on a Trio album. Unfortunately, the attempt did not pan out. Ronstadt later remarked that not too many people were in control at the time and everyone was too involved with their own careers. (Though the efforts to complete the album were abandoned, a number of the recordings were included on the singers' respective solo recordings over the next few years.) This concept album was put on the back burner for almost ten years.
  • 1983
    In 1983 Linda Ronstadt dated comedian Jim Carrey for 8 months.
    More Details Hide Details In the mid-1980s, Ronstadt was engaged to Star Wars director George Lucas. In the early 1980s, Ronstadt was criticized by music critics for playing concerts in South Africa under apartheid. She was listed by the U.N. as supporting apartheid by performing there. At the time, she stated, "The last place for a boycott is in the arts" and "I don't like being told I can't go somewhere." In December 1990, she adopted an infant daughter, Mary Clementine. She later adopted a baby boy, Carlos Ronstadt in 1994. Ronstadt has never married. Speaking of finding an acceptable mate, in 1974 she told Peter Knobler in Crawdaddy, " he's real kind but isn't inspired musically, and then you meet somebody else that's just so inspired musically that he just takes your breath away, but he's such a moron, such a maniac that you can't get along with him. And then after that it's the problem of finding someone that can stand you!"
    By 1983, Ronstadt had enlisted the help of 62-year-old conductor and master of jazz/traditional pop orchestration Nelson Riddle.
    More Details Hide Details The two embarked on an unorthodox and original approach to rehabilitating the Great American Songbook, recording a trilogy of jazz/ traditional pop albums: What's New (1983U.S. 3.7 million as of 2010); Lush Life (1984U.S. 1.7 million as of 2010); and For Sentimental Reasons (1986U.S. 1.3 million as of 2010). The three albums have had a combined sales total of nearly seven million copies in the U.S. alone. box When it became apparent I wouldn't change my mind, he said: 'I love Nelson so much! Can I please come to the sessions. The album design for What's New by designer Kosh was unlike any of her previous disc covers. It showed Ronstadt in a vintage dress lying on shimmering satin sheets with a Walkman headset. At the time, Ronstadt received some chiding for both the album cover and her venture into what was then considered "elevator music" by cynics, but remained determined to record with Riddle, and What's New became a hit. The album was released in September 1983 and spent 81 weeks on the Billboard Album Chart and held the number 3 position for a month and a half (held out of the top spot by Michael Jackson's Thriller and Lionel Richie's Can't Slow Down) and the RIAA certified it triple platinum (over three million copies sold in the U.S. alone). The album earned Ronstadt another Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, and critical raves, with Time magazine calling it "one of the gutsiest, most unorthodox and unexpected albums of the year."
    Between 1983 and 1990, Ronstadt scored six additional platinum albums; two are triple platinum (each with over three million U.S. copies sold); one has been certified double platinum (over two million copies sold); and one has earned additional certification as a Gold (over 500,000 U.S. copies sold) double-disc album.
    More Details Hide Details By recording traditional pop, traditional country and traditional Latin roots Ronstadt resonated with a different fan base and diversified her appeal. In 1981, Ronstadt produced and recorded an album of jazz and pop standards (later marketed in bootleg form) titled Keeping Out of Mischief with the assistance of producer Jerry Wexler. However, Ronstadt's displeasure with the final result led her, with regrets, to scrap the project. "Doing that killed me," she said in a Time magazine interview. But the appeal of the album's music had seduced Ronstadt, as she told Down Beat magazine in April 1985, crediting Wexler for encouraging her. Nonetheless, Ronstadt had to somehow convince her reluctant record company, Elektra Records, to greenlight this type of album under her contract.
    By 1983, her estimated worth was over $40 million mostly from records, concerts and merchandising.
    More Details Hide Details Ronstadt eventually tired of playing arenas. She had ceased to feel that arenas, where people milled around smoking marijuana cigarettes and drinking beer, were "appropriate places for music". She wanted "angels in the architecture"a reference to a lyric in the Paul Simon song "You Can Call Me Al" from the 1986 album Graceland. (Ronstadt sang harmony with Simon on a different Graceland track, "Under African Skies". The second verse's lyrics pay tribute to Ronstadt: "Take this child, Lord, from Tucson, Arizona. "). Ronstadt has said she wants to sing in places similar to the theatre of ancient Greece, where the attention is focused on the stage and the performer. Ronstadt's recording output in the 1980s proved to be just as commercially and critically successful as her 1970s recordings.
  • 1982
    Along with the release of her Get Closer album, Ronstadt embarked on a North American tour, remaining one of the top rock-concert draws that summer and fall. On November 25, 1982, her "Happy Thanksgiving Day" concert was held at the Reunion Arena in Dallas and broadcast live via satellite to NBC radio stations in the United States.
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    In 1982, Ronstadt released the album Get Closer, a primarily rock album with some country and pop music as well.
    More Details Hide Details It remains her only album between 1975 and 1990 not to be officially certified platinum. It peaked at number 31 on the Billboard Album Chart. The release continued her streak of Top 40 hits with "Get Closer" and "I Knew You When"a 1965 hit by Billy Joe Royalwhile the Jimmy Webb song "Easy For You To Say" was a surprise Top 10 Adult Contemporary hit in the spring of 1983. "Sometimes You Just Can't Win" was picked up by country radio, and made it to number 27 on that listing. Ronstadt also filmed several music videos for this album which became popular on the fledgling MTV cable channel. The album earned Ronstadt two Grammy Award nominations: one for Best Rock Vocal Performance/Female for the title track and another for Best Pop Vocal Performance/Female for the album. The artwork won its art director, Kosh, his second Grammy Award for Best Album Package.
  • 1981
    The Pirates of Penzance opened for a limited engagement in New York City's Central Park, eventually moving its production to Broadway, where it became a hit, running from January 8, 1981, to November 28, 1982.
    More Details Hide Details Newsweek was effusive in its praise: "... she has not dodged the coloratura demands of her role (and Mabel is one of the most demanding parts in the G&S canon): from her entrance trilling 'Poor Wand'ring One,' it is clear that she is prepared to scale whatever soprano peaks stand in her way." Ronstadt co-starred with Kline and Angela Lansbury in the 1983 operetta's film version. Ronstadt received a Golden Globe nomination for the role in the film version. She garnered a nomination for the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical and The Pirates of Penzance won several Tony Awards, including a Tony Award for Best Revival. As a child, Ronstadt had discovered the opera La bohème through the silent film with Lillian Gish and was determined to someday play the part of Mimi. When she met the opera superstar Beverly Sills, she was told, "My dear, every soprano in the world wants to play Mimi!" In 1984, Ronstadt was cast in the role at Joseph Papp's Public Theater. However, the production was a critical and commercial disaster, closing after only a few nights.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1980
    In the summer of 1980, Ronstadt began rehearsals for the first of several leads in Broadway musicals.
    More Details Hide Details Joseph Papp cast her as the lead in the New York Shakespeare Festival production of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance, alongside Kevin Kline. She said singing Gilbert and Sullivan was a natural choice for her, since her grandfather Fred Ronstadt was credited with having created Tucson's first orchestra, the Club Filarmonico Tucsonense, and had once created an arrangement of The Pirates of Penzance.
    The album earned Ronstadt a 1980 Grammy Award nomination for Best Rock Vocal Performance/Female (although she lost to Pat Benatar's Crimes of Passion album).
    More Details Hide Details Benatar praised Ronstadt by stating, "There are a lot of good female singers around. How could I be the best? Ronstadt is still alive!"
    In 1980, Ronstadt released Mad Love, her seventh consecutive platinum-selling album.
    More Details Hide Details It was a straightforward rock and roll album with post-punk, new wave influences, including tracks by songwriters such as Elvis Costello, the Cretones, and musician Mark Goldenberg who played on the record himself. She also made the cover of Rolling Stone magazine for a record-setting sixth time. Mad Love entered the Billboard Album Chart in the Top Five its first week (a record at that time) and climbed to the number 3 position. The project continued her streak of Top 10 hits with "How Do I Make You?", originally recorded by Billy Thermal, and "Hurt So Bad", originally a Top 10 hit for Little Anthony & the Imperials.
  • 1979
    In 1979, Ronstadt went on an international tour, playing in arenas across Australia to Japan, including the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Australia, and the Budokan in Tokyo.
    More Details Hide Details She also participated in a benefit concert for her friend Lowell George, held at The Forum, in Los Angeles. By the end of the decade, Ronstadt had outsold her female competition; no other female artist to date had five straight platinum LPsHasten Down the Wind and Heart Like a Wheel among them. Us Weekly reported in 1978 that Ronstadt, Joni Mitchell, Stevie Nicks, and Carly Simon had become "The Queens of Rock" and "Rock is no longer exclusively male. There is a new royalty ruling today's record charts." She would go on to parlay her mass commercial appeal with major success in interpreting The Great American Songbookmade famous a generation before by Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgeraldand later the Mexican folk songs of her childhood. box
    As Rolling Stone magazine dubbed her "Rock's Venus", her record sales continued to multiply and set records themselves. By 1979, Ronstadt had collected eight gold, six platinum, and four multi-platinum certifications for her albums, an unprecedented feat at the time.
    More Details Hide Details Her 1976 Greatest Hits album would sell consistently for the next 25 years and in 2001 was certified by the RIAA for seven-times platinum (over seven million U.S. copies sold). In 1980, Greatest Hits, Volume 2 was released and certified platinum.
  • 1978
    In 1978 alone, she made over $12 million (equivalent to $44,000,000 in 2016 dollars) and in the same year her albums sales were reported to be 17 milliongrossing over $60 million (equivalent to a gross of over $220,000,000, in 2016 dollars).
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    By the end of 1978, Ronstadt had solidified her role as one of rock and pop's most successful solo female acts, and owing to her consistent platinum album success, and her ability as the first-ever woman to sell out concerts in arenas and stadiums hosting tens of thousands of fans, Ronstadt became the "highest paid woman in rock".
    More Details Hide Details She had six platinum-certified albums, three of which were number 1 on the Billboard album chart, and numerous charted pop singles.
    Following the success of Living in the USA, Ronstadt conducted album promotional tours and concerts. She made a guest appearance onstage with the Rolling Stones at the Tucson Community Center on July 21, 1978, in her hometown of Tucson, where she and Jagger sang "Tumbling Dice".
    More Details Hide Details On singing with Jagger, Ronstadt later said, "I loved it. I didn't have a trace of stage fright. I'm scared to death all the way through my own shows. But it was too much fun to get scared. He's so silly onstage, he knocks you over. I mean you have to be on your toes or you wind up falling on your face." box The biggest stars are male, and so are the back-up musicians... rock beats are... phallic, and lyrics... masculine.... Janis Joplin, the first great white woman rocker, rattled the bars... but she died....
    Ronstadt was also featured in the 1978 film FM, where the plot involved disc jockeys attempting to broadcast a Ronstadt concert live, without a competing station's knowledge.
    More Details Hide Details The film also showed Ronstadt performing the songs "Poor, Poor Pitiful Me", "Love Me Tender", and "Tumbling Dice". Ronstadt was persuaded to record "Tumbling Dice" after Mick Jagger came backstage when she was at a concert and said, "You do too many ballads, you should do more rock and roll songs."
    In 1978, Rolling Stone magazine declared Ronstadt, "by far America's best-known female rock singer."
    More Details Hide Details She scored a third number 1 album on the Billboard Album Chart – at this point equaling the record set by Carole King in 1974 – with Living in the USA. She achieved a major hit single with "Ooh Baby Baby", with her rendition hitting all four major singles charts (Pop, AC, Country, R&B). Living in the USA was the first album by any recording act in music history to ship double-platinum (over 2 million advance copies). The album eventually sold 3 million U.S. copies. At the end of that year, Billboard magazine crowned Ronstadt with three number-one Awards for the Year: Pop Female Singles Artist of the Year, Pop Female Album Artist of the Year, and Female Artist of the Year (overall). Living in the USA showed the singer on roller skates with a newly short, permed hairdo on the album cover. Ronstadt continued this theme on concert tour promotional posters with photos of her on roller skates in a dramatic pose with a large American flag in the background. By this stage of her career, she was using posters to promote every album and concert – which at the time were recorded live on radio or television.
  • 1977
    Her 1977 appearance on the cover of Time magazine under the banner "Torchy Rock" was also upsetting to Ronstadt, considering what the image appeared to project about the most famous woman in rock.
    More Details Hide Details At a time in the industry when men still told women what to sing and what to wear, Ronstadt hated the image of her that was projected to the world on that cover, and she noted recently how the photographer kept forcing her to wear a dress, which was an image she did not want to project. In 2004, she was interviewed for CBS This Morning and stated that this image was not her because she did not sit like that. Asher noted, "Anyone who's met Linda for 10 seconds will know that I couldn't possibly have been her Svengali. She's an extremely determined woman, in every area. To me, she was everything that feminism's about." Qualities which, Asher has stated, were considered a "negative (in a woman at that time), whereas in a man they were perceived as being masterful and bold". Since her solo career began, Ronstadt has fought hard to be recognized as a solo female singer in the world of rock, and her portrayal on the Time cover did not appear to help the situation.
    In a 1977 interview, Ronstadt explained, "Annie Leibovitz saw that picture as an expose of my personality.
    More Details Hide Details She was right. But I wouldn't choose to show a picture like that to anybody who didn't know me personally, because only friends could get the other sides of me in balance."
    Also in 1977, she was asked by the Los Angeles Dodgers to sing the U.S. National Anthem at game three of the World Series against the New York Yankees.
    More Details Hide Details Ronstadt has remarked that she felt as though she was "artificially encouraged to kinda cop a really tough attitude (and be tough) because rock and roll is kind of tough (business)," which she felt wasn't worn quite authentically. Female rock artists like her and Janis Joplin, whom she described as lovely, shy, and very literate in real life and the antithesis of the "red hot mamma" she was artificially encouraged to project, went through an identity crisis. By the mid-1970s, Ronstadt's image became just as famous as her music. In 1976 and 1977, she appeared on the covers of Rolling Stone and Time, respectively. The Rolling Stone cover story was accompanied by a series of photographs of Ronstadt in a skimpy red slip, taken by Annie Leibovitz. Ronstadt felt deceived by the photographer, not realizing that the photos would be so revealing. She says her manager Peter Asher kicked Leibovitz out of the house when she visited to show them the photographs prior to publication. Leibovitz had refused to let them veto any of the photos, which included one of Ronstadt sprawled across a bed in her underpants.
    At the end of 1977, Ronstadt surpassed the success of Heart Like a Wheel with her album Simple Dreams, which held the number 1 position for five consecutive weeks on the Billboard 200 chart.
    More Details Hide Details It sold over 3½ million copies in less than a year in the U.S. alone – a record for a female artist. Simple Dreams spawned a string of hit singles on numerous charts. Among them were the RIAA platinum-certified single "Blue Bayou", a country rock interpretation of a Roy Orbison song; "It's So Easy"previously sung by Buddy Holly and "Poor Poor Pitiful Me", a song written by Warren Zevon, an up-and-coming songwriter of the time. The album garnered several Grammy Award nominationsincluding Record of the Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance/Female for "Blue Bayou"and won its art director, Kosh, a Grammy Award for Best Album Cover, the first of three Grammy Awards he would win for designing Ronstadt album covers. Simple Dreams became one of the singer's best-selling international-selling albums as well, reaching number 1 on the Australian and Canadian Pop and Country Albums charts. Simple Dreams also made Ronstadt the most successful international female touring artist as well. The same year, she completed a concert tour around Europe. As Country Music Magazine wrote in October 1978, Simple Dreams solidified Ronstadt's role as "easily the most successful female rock and roll and country star at this time."
    It also included an interpretation of Willie Nelson's classic "Crazy", which became a Top 10 Country hit for Ronstadt in early 1977.
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  • 1976
    In 1976, Ronstadt reached the Top 3 of Billboards Album Chart and won her second career Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for her third consecutive platinum album Hasten Down the Wind.
    More Details Hide Details The album featured a sexy, revealing cover shot and showcased Ronstadt the singer-songwriter, who composed two of its songs, "Try Me Again" (co-authored with Andrew Gold) and "Lo Siento Mi Vida".
  • 1975
    In September 1975, Ronstadt's album Prisoner In Disguise was released.
    More Details Hide Details It quickly climbed into the Top Five on the Billboard Album Chart and sold over a million copies. It became her second in a row to go platinum, "a grand slam" in the same year (Ronstadt would eventually become the first female artist in popular music history to have three consecutive platinum albums and would ultimately go on to have eight consecutive platinum albums, and then another six between 1983 and 1990). The disc's first single release was "Love Is A Rose". It was climbing the pop and country charts but Heat Wave, a rockified version of the 1963 hit by Martha and the Vandellas, was receiving considerable airplay. Asylum pulled the "Love Is a Rose" single and issued "Heat Wave" with "Love Is a Rose" on the B-side. "Heat Wave" hit the Top Five on Billboards Hot 100 while "Love Is A Rose" hit the Top Five on Billboard's country chart.
    Rolling Stone magazine put Ronstadt on its cover in March 1975.
    More Details Hide Details It was the first of six Rolling Stone magazine covers shot by photographer Annie Leibovitz. It included her as the featured artist with a full photo layout and an article by Ben Fong-Torres, discussing Ronstadt's many struggling years in rock n roll, as well as her home life and what it was like to be a woman on tour in a decidedly all-male environment.
    Although Ronstadt had been a cult favorite on the music scene for several years, 1975 was "remembered in the music biz as the year when 29-year-old Linda Ronstadt belatedly happened."
    More Details Hide Details With the release of Heart Like a Wheelnamed after one of the album's songs, written by Anna McGarrigleRonstadt reached number 1 on the Billboard 200 chart; it was also the first of four number 1 Country Albums, and the disc was certified double-platinum (over two million copies sold in the U.S.). In many instances, her own interpretations were more successful than the original recordings, and many times new songwriters were discovered by a larger audience as a result of her interpretation and recording. Ronstadt had major success interpreting songs from a diverse spectrum of artists. Heart Like a Wheels first single release, "You're No Good"a rockified version of an R&B song written by Clint Ballard, Jr. that Ronstadt had initially resisted because Andrew Gold's guitar tracks sounded too much like a "Beatles song" to herclimbed to number 1 on both the Billboard and Cash Box Pop singles charts. The album's second single release, "When Will I Be Loved"an uptempo country-rock version of a Top 10 Everly Brothers songhit number 1 in Cashbox and number 2 in Billboard. The song was also Ronstadt's first number 1 country hit.
  • 1974
    In the 1974 book Rock 'N' Roll Woman, author Katherine Orloff writes that Ronstadt's "own musical preferences run strongly to rhythm and blues, the type of music she most frequently chooses to listen to... (and) her goal is to... be soulful too.
    More Details Hide Details With this in mind, Ronstadt fuses country and rock into a special union." By this stage of her career, Ronstadt had established her niche in the field of country-rock. Along with other musicians such as the Flying Burrito Brothers, Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons, Swampwater, Neil Young, and the Eagles, she helped free country music from stereotypes and showed rockers that country was okay. However, she stated that she was being pushed hard into singing more rock and roll. Author Andrew Greeley, in his book God in Popular Culture, described Ronstadt as "the most successful and certainly the most durable and most gifted woman Rock singer of her era." Signaling her wide popularity as a concert artist, outside of the singles charts and the recording studio, Dirty Linen magazine describes her as the "first true woman rock 'n' roll superstar... (selling) out stadiums with a string of mega-successful albums." Amazon.com defines her as the American female rock superstar of the decade. Cashbox gave Ronstadt a Special Decade Award, as the top-selling female singer of the 1970s.
    Meanwhile, the album became Ronstadt's most successful up to that time, selling 300,000 copies by the end of 1974.
    More Details Hide Details Asher turned out to be more collaborative, and more on the same page with her musically, than any producer she had worked with previously. Ronstadt's professional relationship with Asher allowed her to take command and effectively delegate responsibilities in the recording studio. Although hesitant at first to work with her because of her reputation for being a "woman of strong opinions (who) knew what she wanted to do (with her career)", he nonetheless agreed to become her full-time producer, and remained in that role through the late 1980s. Asher attributed the long-term success of his working relationship with Ronstadt to the fact that he was the first person to manage and produce her with whom there was a solely professional relationship. "It must be a lot harder to have objective conversations about someone's career when it's someone you sleep with", he said.
  • 1971
    Also in 1971, Ronstadt began talking with David Geffen about moving from Capitol Records to Geffen's Asylum Records label.
    More Details Hide Details box But needing someone willing to work with her as an equal, Ronstadt asked Peter Asher, who came highly recommended to her by James Taylor's sister Kate Taylor, to help produce two of them: "Sail Away" and "I Believe in You". The album featured Ronstadt's first country hit, "Silver Threads and Golden Needles", which she had first recorded on Hand Sown... Home Grownthis time hitting the Country Top 20. With the release of Don't Cry Now, Ronstadt took on her biggest gig to date as the opening act on Neil Young's Time Fades Away tour, playing for larger crowds than ever before. Backstage at a concert in Texas, Chris Hillman introduced her to Emmylou Harris, telling them, "You two could be good friends", which soon occurred, resulting in frequent collaborations over the following years.
    Another backing band featured players Don Henley, Glenn Frey, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner, who went on to form the Eagles. They toured with her for a short period in 1971 and played on Linda Ronstadt, her self-titled third album, from which the failed single, Ronstadt's version of Browne's "Rock Me On the Water", was drawn.
    More Details Hide Details At this stage, Ronstadt began working with producer and boyfriend John Boylan. She said, "As soon as I started working with John Boylan, I started co-producing myself. I was always a part of my productions. But I always needed a producer who would carry out my whims."
  • 1969
    She noted in a 1969 interview in Fusion magazine that it was difficult being a single "chick singer" with an all-male backup band.
    More Details Hide Details According to her, it was difficult to get a band of backing musicians because of their ego problem of being labeled sidemen for a female singer. Soon after she went solo in the late 1960s, one of her first backing bands was the pioneering country-rock band Swampwater, famous for synthesizing Cajun and swamp-rock elements into their music. Its members included Cajun fiddler Gib Guilbeau and John Beland, who later joined the Flying Burrito Brothers, as well as Stan Pratt, Thad Maxwell, and Eric White, brother of Clarence White of the Byrds. Swampwater went on to back Ronstadt during TV appearances on The Johnny Cash Show and The Mike Douglas Show, and at the Big Sur Folk Festival.
  • OTHER
  • 1967
    The trio released three albums in a 15-month period in 1967 - 68: The Stone Poneys; Evergreen, Volume 2; and Linda Ronstadt, Stone Poneys and Friends, Vol.
    More Details Hide Details III. The band is best known for their hit single "Different Drum" (written by Michael Nesmith prior to his joining the Monkees), which reached number 13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart as well as number 12 in Cashbox magazine. Nearly 50 years later, the song remains one of Ronstadt's most popular recordings. In 2008 Australia's Raven Records released a compilation CD titled The Stone Poneys. The disc features all tracks from the first two Stone Poneys albums and four tracks from the third album. Still contractually obligated to Capitol Records, Ronstadt released her first solo album, Hand Sown... Home Grown, in 1969. It has been called the first alternative country record by a female recording artist. During this same period, she contributed to the Music From Free Creek "super session" project. Ronstadt provided the vocals for some commercials during this period, including one for Remington electric razors, in which a multitracked Ronstadt and Frank Zappa claimed that the electric razor "cleans you, thrills you... may even keep you from getting busted".
  • 1964
    Ronstadt visited a friend from Tucson, Bobby Kimmel, in Los Angeles during Easter break from college in 1964, and later that year, shortly before her eighteenth birthday, decided to move there permanently to form a band with him.
    More Details Hide Details Kimmel had already begun co-writing folk-rock songs with guitarist-songwriter Kenny Edwards, and eventually the three of them were signed by Nik Venet to Capitol in the summer of 1966 as "the Stone Poneys".
    But increasingly, Ronstadt wanted to make a union of folk music and rock 'n' roll, and in 1964, after a semester at Arizona State University, the 18-year-old decided to move to Los Angeles.
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  • 1946
    Linda Maria Ronstadt was born in 1946 in Tucson, Arizona, daughter to Gilbert Ronstadt (1911 - 1995), a prosperous machinery merchant who ran the F. Ronstadt Co., and Ruth Mary (Copeman) Ronstadt (1914 - 1982), a homemaker.
    More Details Hide Details Ronstadt was raised on the family's ranch with her siblings Peter (who served as Tucson's Chief of Police for ten years, 1981 - 1991), Michael J., and Gretchen (Suzy). The family was featured in Family Circle magazine in 1953. Linda's father came from a pioneering Arizona ranching family and was of German, English, and Mexican ancestry. The family's influence on and contributions to Arizona's history, including wagon making, commerce, pharmacies, and music, are chronicled in the library of the University of Arizona. Linda Ronstadt's great-grandfather, graduate engineer Friedrich August Ronstadt (who went by Federico Augusto Ronstadt) emigrated to the Southwest (then a part of Mexico) in the 1840s from Hanover, Germany, and married a Mexican citizen, eventually settling in Tucson. In 1991, the City of Tucson opened its central transit terminal on March 16 and dedicated it to Linda's grandfather, Federico José María Ronstadt, a local pioneer businessman; he was a wagon maker whose early contribution to the city's mobility included six mule-drawn streetcars delivered in 1903 - 04.
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