Liv Ullmann
actress, author, director
Liv Ullmann
Liv Johanne Ullmann is a Norwegian actress and film director, as well as one of the "muses" of the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. Nominated five times for a Best Actress Golden Globe, winning once for The Emigrants, Ullmann has also been nominated for the Palme d'Or, two times for the Academy Award, and two times for a BAFTA Film Award.
Biography
Liv Ullmann's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Liv Ullmann from around the web
Sperm Count: Talk Dirty to Me
Huffington Post - 2 months
Have you ever talked dirty to someone who reacted to you the way the actress (Liv Ullmann) did to the nurse (Bibi Andersson) at the beginning of Bergman's Persona? If you remember the actress refuses to respond to the nurse's garrulous banter which eventually results in the nurse herself having psychotic break in which the tables are dramatically turned. Indifference is actually worse than pure hostility. It's a denial of one's being. But under the theory Bergman proposes the solution lies in just giving the offending party a dose of their own medicine. Persona creates the perfect palette to work from, in fact, for anyone who feels they're being unjustly ignored. Whether you're trying to talk dirty or you're just plain needy, the great Swedish director demonstrated that if you keep your mouth shut, you'll find that the object of your interest will coming back to you for more. Dirty talk is not always a quid pro quo. With some people you have to light the fire then play hard to get. Ho ...
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Huffington Post article
The Malignancy of a Marital Secret: The Film '45 Years'
Huffington Post - over 1 year
In 1973, I saw Igmar Bergman's film, "Scenes from a Marriage," with explores the disintegration of a marriage between Marianne, a lawyer, and Johan, a professor, played respectively by Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson. The scene in this film that haunts me to this day is an opening one that foreshadows what is to follow: Marianne, a divorce lawyer, interviews a woman in her 70s seeking a divorce. "Why now?" asks an incredulous Marianne. "Everything is grey," she is told. This is the scene I recalled at the opening moments of "45 Years," the intense film directed by Andrew Haigh about a couple and their lives in a village in the English countryside. It is not to be missed, except by those faint of heart or those who have no patience with slow, but brilliant character development. Here one finds the same foreboding sense of grey found in Bergman's marital examination. Yes, the grey is a matter of age, but far more, a matter of a malignant secret and its marital impact. (Spoiler Alert: ...
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Huffington Post article
REVIEW: 'Liv & Ingmar' ★★&#9733
Chicago Times - about 3 years
An actress-director affair for the ages "Liv & Ingmar" is a lovely and lyrical documentary about the passionate, mutually inspiring yet fraught relationship between the late filmmaker Ingmar Bergman and his lover, frequent collaborator and, ultimately, dear friend, actress Liv Ullmann.     
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Chicago Times article
Ask Mick LaSalle: Bergman tests observer's resolve
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
Can you think of other performances, male or female, where you feel you are experiencing the stress of being an observer? [...] if you think "Blue Jasmine" is intense, strap yourself into a chair and watch Ingrid Bergman and Liv Ullmann go 12 rounds with each other in "Autumn Sonata." Hey Mister Stanley: I've received dozens of e-mails telling me about the San Francisco accent, but only one described it to me in a way that I could actually hear it. Dear Leonard Abel: I did talk about the acting and the writing, but would you really rather have me talk about the finer points of cinematography while ignoring the most glaring thing about the film? Should I talk about the sound-effects editing, too, before ever mentioning that James Gandolfini looks so awful in "Enough Said" that it's impossible to think of anything else? I take a backseat to nobody, at least none of his fans, in grieving the loss of this actor. [...] the problem with "Enough Said" isn't that he died, but that if he h ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
George Heymont: Dressed For Distress
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Recently, while dining together, a friend launched into a new topic with the following opener: "I was having a conversation with the voices in my head the other day...." "You do realize that's a captive audience?" I teased. "Of course," he replied, "but at least they all agreed with me." Those intimate, all-too-knowing kinds of conversations can get a girl in trouble. While it's easy enough to invoke the "On the one hand this, but on the other hand that...." approach to analyzing a situation, it can often lead one down the slippery slope to delusional thinking and bizarre behavior. Consider Dorothy Loudon's brilliant mashup of two songs during 1992's Sondheim: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall. Often, when we envision a damsel in distress we imagine characters like the protagonist of the 1914 silent film serial entitled The Perils of Pauline, Lois Lane hoping to be rescued by Superman, or the beefy Belle Rosen (Shelley Winters) demonstrating her swimming techniqu ...
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Huffington Post article
Michael Vazquez: Blue Jasmine Review Plus Cate Blanchett Interview (VIDEO)
Huffington Post - over 3 years
New York son Woody Allen's back from Europe and he's unpacking some American baggage; Cate Blanchett talks of liminally channeling Hedda Gabler, Mary Tyrone, and Blanche DuBois. While no one will likely agree with me on the similarities twixt Blue Jasmine and A Streetcar Named Desire, for me the visiting neurotic clashing with her sister's simple, working-man partner merits some mild comparison, as does the casting of Brando-browed Bobby Carnavale as Chili, as perhaps a kindler, gentler Stanley Kowalski of sorts delivering his own "Stella!" scene, not on a rainy street, but in the produce aisle of a grocery store, and he doesn't overturn a dinner table, but he does rip a phone out of the wall, and later in the film, (again, in a kind of gentler SK mode) he gushes with pride about his self-correction, after refraining from telling his GF's half-crazy sister what he really thinks of her. In many ways, the domestic setting is really a microcosm of greater forces, namely th ...
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Huffington Post article
NYC-ARTS: Indie Film Festival at Stony Brook
Huffington Post - over 3 years
The Stony Brook Film Festival launches its 18th season on Thursday, July 18, with world, U.S. and East Coast premieres. For ten days through July 27, the festival brings an exciting mix of independent features, many of them foreign productions, as well as documentaries and short indie films to the Staller Center for the Arts on Stony Brook University's campus. Alan Inkles, founder and director of the festival, has carefully curated the selections for the popular, 10-day summer festival, giving audiences screening experiences they won't find anywhere else. "In the most competitive season in our 18-year festival, I felt we left a second festival on the cutting room floor. The entries this year, both in the shorts and features categories, were challenging, entertaining and full of discoveries," said Mr. Inkles. The festival pairs short films with most features, which largely make up a whirlwind tour of international cinema, often co-produced between various countries. ...
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Huffington Post article
Jack Meyer: Grattis På Födelsedagen, Ingmar Bergman!
Huffington Post - over 3 years
July 14 marks the birthday of legendary Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman. The quintessential art house filmmaker would have turned ninety-five this year. Bergman crafted mesmerizing, and, often, disturbing films which explored existential themes of dread and isolation. To the average moviegoer, the films of Bergman seem heavy-handed and inaccessible; in other words, his films should be reserved for film theory classes and artistic types who genuinely understand the language of the enigmatic Swede. Yet, once this veil of intimidation has been lifted, moviegoers will realize Bergman's films are unexpectedly accessible and compelling. Bergman is one of my favorite directors of all time. I revisit his films as if they are musty old novels, and I am always surprised to discover something new about a character (and sometimes myself), in one of Bergman's spellbinding works. I like to think of Bergman as a sort of filmic philosopher and psychiatrist. Bergman explored ideas such as ...
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Huffington Post article
Jon Eig: All Time Oscars: The 10 Best Actresses in a Leading Role
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
Some lists are just lists. Some lists reveal deeper truths. Then there's this one. When I sat down to compile my list of the all time greatest performances by an actress in a lead role, I went through all the steps I had gone through when putting together the other acting lists. When I got to my short list this fact hit me: Only three of my top 10 appeared in American films. I was raised on American film, and my previous lists have shown that bias. So what is it about American film that seems to deny lead actresses great parts? I mean, we created Blanche DuBois and The Women on stage, Lucy Ricardo and The Gilmore Girls on TV. But even allowing for all the omissions I will no doubt hear about, I can't find enough female counterparts in American film. I'll leave you to ponder that as I unveil the greatest performances by a leading actress (of all time!). Bibi Andersson (Persona, 1966): It would be easy to fill this list with Ingmar Bergman actresses. Liv Ullmann, in ...
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Huffington Post article
What She's Doing Next
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Jessica Chastain: can't stop, won't stop. The perma-busy actress, onscreen now in both "Zero Dark Thirty" and "Mama," has signed up to star in Liv Ullmann's upcoming adaptation of "Miss Julie," the 1888 play written by August Strindberg. According to Variety, Colin Farrell and Samantha Morton have also signed up for roles. Set in 1874, Strindberg's play focuses on the title Miss Julie (Chastain), who breaks away from her upstairs life by spending time with the servants during a summertime party. There, she meets an older servant named Jean, who changes her life. No word yet on who would play Jean, but Farrell seems too young for the role; he's only one year older than Chastain, and Jean remembers Miss Julie from when she was a child. "Miss Julie" was previously adapted by Mike Figgis in 1999 with Saffron Burrows and Peter Mullan in the lead roles. Chastain teased her involvement with "Miss Julie" earlier in January, which came as a surprise since Michelle Williams was ...
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Huffington Post article
What Do We Know About Paul Thomas Anderson’s New Scientology Film?
The New Republic - over 4 years
I know it’s not customary, but the customary is fading like spit in the sun. So I want to review two trailers for Paul Thomas Anderson’s next film, The Master, which will be released in October. The second trailer appeared online in June, the first a month earlier. They accompany the limited announcement that the film, set around 1950, is about one man who starts a new religion, and another who becomes his follower. It remains to be seen whether this description is accurate or sufficient. I want to approach the trailers as two films, each about ninety seconds long. They are unlike regular trailers in that they intend to be mysterious; that’s what makes them movies. The first (let’s call it “May”) begins with a close-up of Joaquin Phoenix, his head tilted back against the right-hand edge of the frame, his eyes narrowed by smiling at some interrogation he is undergoing. There is the blur of a shoulder in the other corner of the frame that may be his questioner. The image cuts to a beac ...
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The New Republic article
Cate Blanchett Talks SK-II, Playing Bob Dylan And More - StyleList
Google News - over 5 years
I worked with Liv Ullmann a couple years ago. And from a creative perspective, her career, and her as a person, but also her, as an incredibly beautiful woman, I find her really inspiring. But a place, I really do love the desert
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Google News article
DVD Review: Face to Face - Inside Pulse
Google News - over 5 years
Dr. Jenny Isaksson (Liv Ullmann) is a psychiatrist married who seemingly has a great life. She's married to another psychiatrist and both are successful. Slowly and agonizingly Jenny succumbs to a breakdown, haunted by images and emotions from her past
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Google News article
Hollywood actress Glenn Close to receive Spain's San Sebastian lifetime award - Washington Post
Google News - over 5 years
Previous recipients of the Donostia lifetime award have included American actors Richard Gere and Meryl Streep, Spanish actor Antonio Banderas and Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann. The annual festival is due to culminate with a star-studded red carpet
Article Link:
Google News article
The MOD Quad: Blood Bath, Burn Witch Burn, Harry In Your Pocket, and Keaton's Cop - Film School Rejects
Google News - over 5 years
Directed by Alexander Ramati. THE AMBASSADOR (1984) Stars Robert Mitchum, Ellen Burstyn, Rock Hudson. Directed by J. Lee Thompson. THE ROSE GARDEN (1989) Stars Liv Ullmann, Maximilian Schell, peter Fonda. Directed by Fons Rademakers
Article Link:
Google News article
Patch Picks: A Weekend of Arts in the Hudson Valley - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Summer Nights with Ingmar Bergman continues at The Tarrytown Music Hall with Persona, starring Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann, on Aug. 6. The film series, selected and introduced by David Schwartz, Chief Curator, Museum of the Moving Image continues on
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Liv Ullmann
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2013
    Age 74
    In 2013 it was announced that Ullmann would direct a film adaptation of Miss Julie.
    More Details Hide Details The film, released in 2014, stars Jessica Chastain, Colin Farrell and Samantha Morton. It was widely praised by the Norwegian press after its premiere in September 2014. In addition to Norwegian, Ullmann speaks Swedish, English and other European languages.
  • 2009
    Age 70
    She later directed Blanchett in the play A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams, at the Sydney Theatre Company in Sydney, Australia, which was performed September through October 2009, and then continued from 29 October to 21 November 2009 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., where it won a Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Non-resident Production as well as actress and supporting performer for 2009.
    More Details Hide Details The play was also performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in Brooklyn, New York.
  • 2008
    Age 69
    In 2008 she was the head of the jury at the 30th Moscow International Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details She published two autobiographies, Changing (1977) and Choices (1984). During 2012, she attended the International Indian Film Academy Awards in Singapore, where she was honored for her Outstanding Contributions to International Cinema and she also showed her movie on her relationship with Ingmar Bergman. Ullmann's first film as a director was Sofie (1992), in which she directed her friend and former co-actor, Erland Josephson. She later directed the Bergman-composed movie Faithless (2000). Faithless garnered nominations for both the Palme d'Or and Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival. During 2006 Ullmann announced that she had been forced to end her longtime wish of making a film based on A Doll's House. According to her statement, the Norwegian Film Fund was preventing her and writer Kjetil Bjørnstad from pursuing the project. Australian actress Cate Blanchett and British actress Kate Winslet had been cast intended in the main roles of the movie.
  • 2007
    Age 68
    Ullmann narrated the Canada - Norway co-produced animated short movie The Danish Poet (2006), which won the Academy Award for Animated Short Film at the 79th Academy Awards during 2007.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2004
    Age 65
    In 2004 Ullmann revealed that she had received an offer in November 2003 to play in 3 episodes of the popular American series, Sex and the City.
    More Details Hide Details Ullmann was amused by the offer and said that it was one of the few programs she regularly watched, but she turned it down. Later that year Steven Soderbergh wrote a role in the movie Ocean's 12 especially for Ullmann but it was also turned down by her.
  • 2003
    Age 64
    In 2003 Ullmann reprised her role for Scenes from a Marriage in Saraband (2003), Bergman's final telemovie.
    More Details Hide Details This was her comeback as an actress since her last role on the screen, in the Swedish movie Zorn (1994).
  • FIFTIES
  • 1995
    Age 56
    During the 1980s, she married Boston real estate developer Donald Saunders, whom she divorced during 1995.
    More Details Hide Details The couple continued to live together until 2007. She is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and has traveled widely for the organization. She is also co-founder and honorary chair of the Women's Refugee Commission. In 2005, King Harald V of Norway made Ullmann a Commander with Star of the Order of St. Olav. In 2006, she received an honorary degree, dr. philos. honoris causa, from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • FORTIES
  • 1984
    Age 45
    During 1984 she was chairperson of the jury at the 34th Berlin International Film Festival, and during 2002 chaired the jury of Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details She introduced her daughter, Linn Ullmann, to the audience with the words: "Here comes the woman whom Ingmar Bergman loves the most". Her daughter was there to receive the Prize of Honour on behalf of her father; she would return to serve the jury herself during 2011.
  • 1982
    Age 43
    In 1982 Ingmar Bergman wanted Ullmann to play the main character Emelie Ekdahl in his last feature film, Fanny and Alexander and wrote the role with this in mind.
    More Details Hide Details But Ullmann felt the role was too sad and declined. Liv Ullmann later stated in interviews that turning it down was one of the few things she really regrets.
  • 1980
    Age 41
    In 1980 Brian De Palma, who directed Carrie, wanted Liv Ullmann to play the role of Kate Miller in the erotic crime thriller Dressed to Kill and offered it to her, but she declined because of the violence.
    More Details Hide Details The role subsequently went to Angie Dickinson.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1975
    Age 36
    Ullmann made her New York City stage debut in 1975 also in A Doll's House.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1973
    Age 34
    She also featured in the widely deprecated musical movie remake of Lost Horizon during 1973.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1971
    Age 32
    During 1971, Ullmann was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for the movie The Emigrants, and again during 1976 for the movie Face to Face.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1938
    Born
    Born in 1938.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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