Love Is...
Love Is...
Love is... is the name of a comic strip created by New Zealand cartoonist Kim Casali in the late 1960s.. The strip is syndicated worldwide by Tribune Media Services. The cartoons originated from a series of love notes that Casali drew for her future husband, Roberto Casali. The strip was first published in 1970, under the pen name "Kim", and was syndicated soon after. One of her most famous drawings, "Love Is...
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Crossing Over To The Dark Side
Huffington Post - 5 days
Fifty years have passed since a double bill by Peter Shaffer opened at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre on February 12, 1967. Directed by John Dexter (with a cast that featured Michael Crawford and Lynn Redgrave in their Broadway debuts), Black Comedy/White Lies turned out to be an audience pleaser that ran for 337 performances. Black Comedy was a droll farce that began in a young man's apartment at 9:30 on a Sunday night. Although people on both sides of the footlights were in complete darkness as the play began, the confused audience could hear the voices of Shaffer's characters carrying on a conventional conversation at a cocktail party. Once the apartment's electricity suffered a short circuit, the lights came up onstage and (as if by magic) the audience could see everything that was happening while the cast had to pretend that their characters were stumbling around in the dark. Thanks to Shaffer's gimmicky approach to what happens during an electrical blackout, much hilarity ensued. ...
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Huffington Post article
Stop Telling Me How To Be A Widow
Huffington Post - 6 days
Before you start tossing around the “H” word ― hussy, the brazen variety ― let me assure you that I deeply loved the man I was married to. But 10 days after his death last month, I became that cliche: The new widow who runs out and buys a hot red car. This car, she’s a beauty. She came fully equipped with all those high-tech bells and whistles; she listens to my voice and actually does what I tell her ― something my late husband, rest his soul, never did with any regularity. She has a panoramic sunroof that highlights the red in my hair and hell, she even parallel parks herself so that I won’t get stressed out having to do it. I first laid eyes on this red bad girl around New Year’s when my husband was in a nursing home. The kids and I were breaking up the awfulness of caregiving by stopping in at car dealerships and pretending to be in the market for a new car. And there she was. She was primping and staring at her reflection in the windows of a dealership and I swear she n ...
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Huffington Post article
Rethinking Love: Is love an emotion?
Huffington Post - 7 days
February 14, 2017 Is love an emotion? Let's put aside loving your job or a piece of clothing, in which the use of the word "love" is as a superlative. That still leaves romantic love and parental love: Are either of these emotions? I think not and here's why: the time frame for emotions and love are radically different. Emotions come and go, sometimes lasting as little as a few seconds, and rarely more than an hour. If we recollect that we were mad for an hour or afraid for an hour close examination reveals that actually we felt that emotion a number of times within the hour, it wasn't one continuous emotional episode. Both parental love and romantic love involve long-term commitments, intense attachments to a specific other person. Neither is itself an emotion. Emotions can be very brief, but love endures. However, while romantic love can endure throughout a lifetime, it often does not. Parental love, more typically, is a lifelong commitment, although there are exceptions in whic ...
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Huffington Post article
3 Romances To Remind You That Love Is All Around — All Year Long
NPR - 7 days
Sure, it's Valentine's Day — the day we set aside for flowers, chocolates, wine and declarations of love. But love is more than one day, so here are three romances you can enjoy any time of year. (Image credit: Mareike Standow/EyeEm/Getty Images)
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NPR article
Versace releases love-themed Valentine’s Day bracelet
LATimes - 8 days
Versace released a limited-edition bracelet to celebrate Saint Valentine's day. Named "All Love Is Love," the adjustable leather braided accessory features the brand's signature logo tag and a Medusa Head-shaped charm in gold tone. Two additional round-shaped pendants have been also designed to...
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LATimes article
Versace releases love-themed Valentine’s Day bracelet
LATimes - 8 days
Versace released a limited-edition bracelet to celebrate Saint Valentine's day. Named "All Love Is Love," the adjustable leather braided accessory features the brand's signature logo tag and a Medusa Head-shaped charm in gold tone. Two additional round-shaped pendants have been also designed to...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Love Is...
    THIRTIES
  • 2005
    In one 2005 strip the couple are accompanied by two cats, and in 2009 the woman is shown crying over her deceased cat.
    More Details Hide Details The characters may appear single or together; when one is thinking about the other, the partner's face will appear (in various forms, such as a dream balloon, a photo or a screen saver). Items appearing in the strip are often shown in the shape of or featuring, hearts - symbolic of the strip's theme. The male is sometimes shown reading a newspaper named Daily Blah. Other men shown in the strips are different in their looks. They have curly blond hair and sometimes shown with a mustache, while the male is always shown with his usual black short straight hair. Other women shown in strips are short haired as compared to the female who has waist length hair. Although the strip generally deals with light issues, sometimes there are messages related to environment conservation and teaching their kids lessons about the environment. In one of the strips the characters are shown campaigning to save children.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1997
    Upon her death in 1997, Casali's son Stefano took over Minikim, the company which handles the intellectual rights.
    More Details Hide Details The strip appears daily except Sunday. Love Is is a single-frame strip. The upper left-hand corner starts with a simple phrase which always begins with "Love Is ", the drawing appears in the middle and the remainder of the phrase at the bottom (along with the legal jargon). Each strip is independent of the others; there are no "series" of strips running for a period of time covering the same topic. The main characters are a man and woman depicted unclothed, with no primary or secondary sexual features shown other than the woman having nipples. It is clear which character is male and which is female due to tertiary features. The male has dark black, short hair while the female has light, waist-length hair. The characters have been featured in various stages of romance: just meeting, as boyfriend and girlfriend, and as a married couple. Sometimes, the male is shown in a military uniform. A 1974 strip has the male naming the female as "Kim", while a 1971 panel has the female writing the letter 'R' in the beach sand. Both of these are consistent with original cartoonist Kim Casali and her husband Roberto.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1975
    Roberto Casali was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 1975 and Kim stopped working on the cartoon to spend more time with him.
    More Details Hide Details Casali commissioned London-based British cartoonist Bill Asprey to take over the writing and drawing of the daily cartoons for her, under her pen name. Asprey has produced the cartoon continuously since 1975.
  • 1972
    One of her most famous drawings, "Love Is being able to say you are sorry", published on February 9, 1972, was marketed internationally for many years in print, on cards and on souvenirs.
    More Details Hide Details The beginning of the strip coincided closely with the 1970 film Love Story. The film's signature line is "Love means never having to say you're sorry." At the height of their popularity in the 1970s the cartoons were earning Casali £4-5 million annually.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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