Lyle Talbot
Actor
Lyle Talbot
Lyle Talbot was an American actor on stage and screen, best known for his long career in film from 1931 to 1960 and for his frequent appearances on television in the 1950s and 1960s, including his decade-long role as Joe Randolph on the ABC situation comedy, 'The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.
Biography
Lyle Talbot's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Lyle Talbot
News
News abour Lyle Talbot from around the web
How Bette Davis Lost Out on Gone With The Wind - Village Voice (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
(Maybe after working with Richard Barthelmess and Lyle Talbot, she'd had enough.) Whether all this is true or not, I'm glad Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable ultimately got to be Scarlett and Rhett. And I'm glad Bette's fiery bitterness over the situation
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Ann Dvorak one unforgettable 'girlie' on TCM's Summer Under The Star Aug. 9 - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Dvorak's character like the coach's team eventually have enough and she leaves him for one of her husband's players (Lyle Talbot). A apparent forerunner to Friday Night Lights, College Coach, directed by William Wellman (who then years later would
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Google News article
From the files of The Cabinet, July 21-28 - Cabinet.com
Google News - over 5 years
The Tremont Theater in Nashua was showing “Murder by an Aristocrat” with Lyle Talbot and Marguerite Churchill, and Gene Autry in “Sage Brush Troubadour.” Clinton G. Blaisdell was building a bungalow on land he had purchased in the west part of Mont
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Top Ten Tuesday: The Best of Vincent Price - We Are Movie Geeks
Google News - almost 6 years
He's arrogant, pompous, and dismissive especially with his squad of yes men ( which include Ed Wood regular Lyle Talbot, who played Lex Luthor in the serial ATOM MAN VS. SUPERMAN and Commissioner Gordon in the serial BATMAN AND ROBIN, and John Hart who
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Google News article
Agent of STYLE: The Jumpsuits, Power Suits and Warsuits of Lex Luthor! Part 2 - Newsarama (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
In Atom Man Vs. Superman, Luthor was depicted by Lyle Talbot as a corrupt private businessman who was also quite the scientist in his spare time. Depending on the scene, he either sported a black suit or had thrown a lab coat over it
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Google News article
Selling History With '50s Pulp Pow and Punch
NYTimes - over 6 years
The rendezvous was set for 2 p.m. sharp at Cafe Sabarsky on the teeming island metropolis of Manhattan. This Old World outpost was dark and silent as a tomb -- except for the music, lively chatter and oversize windows. Near the bar sat a white-haired gentleman in black and a vivacious blonde with a slash of blood-red lipstick. On the table in front
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DVDS; On the William Wellman Depression Express
NYTimes - almost 8 years
AS a filmmaker William Wellman loved planes, trains and automobiles -- but mostly planes. A volunteer member of the Lafayette Flying Corps in World War I, he drew on his experiences as a combat pilot for ''Wings'' (1927), his first major hit as a director and the first film to win the Academy Award for best picture (then called most outstanding
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CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 9 years
FORBIDDEN HOLLYWOOD COLLECTION, VOLUME 2 The first volume of Warner Home Video's ''Forbidden Hollywood Collection,'' devoted to the frank and racy films that emerged from Hollywood before the strict enforcement of the Production Code in 1934, contained a bombshell in the form of a recently rediscovered, uncensored print of ''Baby Face,'' a 1933
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NYTimes article
Twilight for TV's Old Troupers
NYTimes - almost 20 years
The recent death of Don Porter, who played Ann Southern's boss in the 1950's situation comedy ''Private Secretary,'' is a reminder that the first generation of TV situation-comedy performers is vanishing fast. Marjorie Reynolds, who was William Bendix's wife in ''The Life of Riley'' died in February, too. Jesse White, another Ann Southern veteran,
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NYTimes article
Lyle Talbot, 94, Charactor Actor And TV Neighbor
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Lyle Talbot, a veteran character actor in movies and on television, died Sunday at his home in San Francisco. He was 94. Mr. Talbot, who began his career as a contract player at Warner Brothers in the 1930's, was one of those actors whose face was more familiar than his name. He appeared in more than 150 films in a wide spectrum of genres: from
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NYTimes article
A Regular From Cult Movies of Old Re-emerges as a Primary Attraction
NYTimes - over 23 years
Any number of actors can point to an Oscar on the shelf. Only Conrad Brooks can stand up and say that he appeared in virtually every film by Edward Wood Jr., often acclaimed as the worst director in the history of the cinema, the anti-genius behind "Plan 9 From Outer Space," a film that must be seen several times for full comprehension of its
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NYTimes article
Beverly Hills
NYTimes - over 24 years
To the Editor: The Beverly Hills Hotel was not always the glamorous spot that David Masello described in "Life Atop the Hills of Beverly" (Aug. 23). In 1933 the Beverly Hills Hotel proper was closed. This was the Depression. Vacant, the large rambling hotel resembled a haunted house. Perhaps the tennis courts were kept up. I don't remember a pool,
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HOME VIDEO; DOCUMENTARY
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: World Without Walls: Beryl Markham's African Memoir Narrated by Diana Quick and Lyle Talbot. Wild Wing Productions. 60 minutes. $29.95. Beryl Markham, who in her youth looked as striking as Vanessa Redgrave, died last year in Nairobi. Suddenly, she is more acclaimed in death than in life. Her memoir, ''West With the Night,'' rediscovered and
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FILM VIEW; Charting Stars Across the Decades
NYTimes - about 30 years
The death two weeks ago of Cary Grant, who was equally at ease in dinner clothes, a Salvation Army uniform or a solar topee, was a page-one reminder that, unlike Grant, the majority of today's real stars no longer have anything to do with movies. There are a handful of film giants still going strong - Clint Eastwood and Paul Newman, among others at
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NYTimes article
TV REVIEWS; 'World Without Walls,' About Beryl Markham
NYTimes - over 30 years
TONIGHT'S beautifully crafted documentary film about the still somewhat mysterious life of Beryl Markham is rooted in the rediscovery of her personal memoir, ''West With the Night,'' which was reissued in 1983 by North Point Press, the publishing house in Berkeley, Calif., after being out of print for many years. Here is a good television
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SUNDAY OBSERVER; Reeking of Savoir-Faire
NYTimes - over 30 years
THE OBSERVANCE this summer of the 100th anniversary of the tuxedo evoked painful memories for me of a long ago when I yearned to pass for a man of the world. My dream then was to be suave and sophisticated and to reek of savoir-faire. I would never have spoken such words except in mocking tones, but silently I acknowledged that ''suave,''
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OBSERVER; Is That All There Is?
NYTimes - over 30 years
Cable TV came to our house last month. Now I can get the Weather Channel. It tells me of the climate in faraway places: Very hot in Dallas. Severe thunderstorm warnings for three counties in Kansas. I struggle to get interested, but fail. It is hard getting interested in weather that is 1,500 miles away. Great distance from the scene of hardship
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OBSERVER; RAKING THE EMBERS
NYTimes - about 33 years
When I was 14 or so, my visions of how I would sin when I grew up were shaped by the movies. In that era, movies were filmed in black and white for a square screen and the actors almost always dressed formally for dinner. That is, they wore what was then called a tuxedo, or a tux. Nowadays you have to call it a dinner jacket since people who call
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CONNECTICUT GUIDE; HALLOWEEN AT YALE
NYTimes - over 34 years
Halloween, originally the druidic New Year's Eve, will be observed by the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History from 1 to 4:45 P.M. today. ''Before the spread of Christianity the Celts celebrated New Year's Day on Nov. 1, coinciding with the seasonal harvest,'' a spokesman for the museum said. For an admission price of 50 cents and $1,
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NYTimes article
TV: 'THE CASE OF DASHIELL HAMMETT'
NYTimes - over 34 years
TV, Channel 13, tonight at 9 offers an introduction to this interesting personality who led separate lives, not at once, but in different times of life. This hourlong production is a true essay, an illustrated lecture, written by its producer, Stephen Talbot. You will not learn all you want to know about Hammett here, but you will get a point of
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lyle Talbot
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1996
    Age 94
    Talbot died in 1996 at his home in San Francisco, California, aged 94, from congestive heart failure.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1959
    Age 57
    In 1959, Talbot played Sheriff Clyde Chadwick in the episode "The Sanctuary" on Colt .45.
    More Details Hide Details Other guest appearances included Annie Oakley, It's a Great Life, The Public Defender, The Pride of the Family, Crossroads, Hey, Jeannie! The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, Broken Arrow, The Millionaire, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Tales of Wells Fargo, Buckskin, Cimarron City, Angel, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip, Surfside 6, The Roaring 20s, The Restless Gun, Stagecoach West, The Red Skelton Show, The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Topper, The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, Laredo, Perry Mason, The Real McCoys, Rawhide, Wagon Train, Charlie's Angels, Newhart, The Dukes of Hazzard, St. Elsewhere, and Who's the Boss? He appeared occasionally on television in his eighties and narrated two PBS biographies, The Case of Dashiell Hammett and World Without Walls about pioneering pilot Beryl Markham, both produced and written by his son, Stephen Talbot, formerly a recurring cast member, Gilbert Bates, on Leave It to Beaver, another series on which his father had also appeared. Talbot was the first live action actor to play two prominent DC Comics characters on-screen: the aforementioned Commissioner Gordon in Batman and Robin, and supervillain Lex Luthor in Atom Man vs. Superman (who at the time was simply known as Luthor). Talbot began a longstanding tradition of actors in these roles that were most recently filled by Gary Oldman and Kevin Spacey, respectively.
  • 1953
    Age 51
    From 1953–57, he was cast as different characters in four episodes of the anthology series, Lux Video Theatre.
    More Details Hide Details In 1967, he played Colonel Blake three times on The Beverly Hillbillies, and also appeared three times (between 1965–71) on Green Acres. On one episode of Green Acres Talbot played himself, as a senator, in a spoof on actors who became politicians.
  • FORTIES
  • 1950
    Age 48
    From 1950–55, he was cast five times in different roles on the western, The Lone Ranger.
    More Details Hide Details In 1955, he appeared as Baylor in six episodes of the series, Commando Cody: Sky Marshal of the Universe.
  • 1948
    Age 46
    After several brief marriages and a number of romantic entanglements, Talbot in 1948 married for the fifth time, to a young singer and actress, Margaret "Paula" Epple; the couple had four children together and remained married for more than forty years until her death in 1989.
    More Details Hide Details Three of the four children became writers or journalists. Only Cynthia Talbot, the elder daughter, did not. She is a family physician and residency director in Portland, Oregon. One of Talbot's grandchildren, Caitlin Talbot, is an actress based in Los Angeles.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1940
    Age 38
    Having started his career in the theater and later co-starred on Broadway in 1940-1941 in Separate Rooms, Talbot returned to the stage in the 1960s and 1970s, starring in national road company versions of Thornton Wilder's The Matchmaker, Gore Vidal's The Best Man, Neil Simon's The Odd Couple and Barefoot in the Park, Arthur Sumner Long's play Never Too Late, and appearing as Captain Brackett in a 1967 revival of South Pacific (at Lincoln Center).
    More Details Hide Details He also starred in Preston Jones' "The Last Meeting of the Knights of the White Magnolia" at the Alley Theater in Houston and the Chicago area Lincolnshire Theater. Although Talbot once starred in a film called Trapped by Television (1936), the invention of TV actually revived his acting career, as his movie roles faded. Talbot was a frequent presence on American television from the 1950s well into the 1970s with occasional appearances in the 1980s. From 1955–66, he appeared in some seventy episodes of The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, as neighbor Joe Randolph. He also had a recurring role (1955–58) as Robert Cummings's character's buddy from the Air Force, Paul Fonda, in numerous episodes of The Bob Cummings Show. During the 1950s/60s Talbot acted in every genre from westerns to comedies to mysteries. He played Colonel Billings three times on the syndicated western series, The Adventures of Kit Carson (1951–1955), starring Bill Williams. He appeared four times as a judge on the syndicated western The Cisco Kid, starring Duncan Renaldo and Leo Carrillo. He guest starred on Gene Autry's The Range Rider, starring Jock Mahoney and Dick Jones.
  • 1934
    Age 32
    He played a star running back in College Coach (1933) with Pat O'Brien and Dick Powell, romanced opera singer Grace Moore in One Night of Love in 1934, and pursued Mae West in Go West, Young Man (1936).
    More Details Hide Details He was a gangster in Ladies They Talk About and Heat Lightning and a doctor kicking a drinking habit in Mandalay. He co-starred with Pat O'Brien in Oil for the Lamps of China (1935). He would appear opposite Ann Dvorak, Carole Lombard, Barbara Stanwyck, Mary Astor, Ginger Rogers, and Shirley Temple during his career, as well as sharing the screen with Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy and Tyrone Power. Overall, Talbot would appear in some 150 movies. Talbot's activism in SAG union affairs reportedly hurt his career. Warner Bros. dropped him from its roster, and Talbot seldom received starring roles again. He became a capable character actor, playing affable neighbors or crafty villains with equal finesse. Talbot's supporting roles spanned the gamut, as he played cowboys, pirates, detectives, cops, surgeons, psychiatrists, soldiers, judges, newspaper editors, storekeepers, and boxers. In later years, he would claim to have never rejected a single role offered to him, including three now infamous Ed Wood, films: Glen or Glenda, Jail Bait and Plan 9 from Outer Space. Talbot worked with the Three Stooges in Gold Raiders, was the first actor to portray evil scientist Lex Luthor onscreen in 1950's Atom Man vs. Superman (wearing a rubber "bald cap"), played villains in four comedies with The Bowery Boys, and took the role of Commissioner Gordon in the 1949 serial Batman and Robin.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1931
    Age 29
    He went to Hollywood in 1931, when the film industry began producing movies with sound and needed "actors who could talk".
    More Details Hide Details His screen test at Warner Bros. was watched and appreciated by studio production chief Darryl F. Zanuck and, even more so, by director William Wellman who immediately wanted to cast Talbot. Talbot became a contract player at Warners along with the likes of Bette Davis and Humphrey Bogart. Most notable among Talbot's film work were his appearances in Three on a Match and 20,000 Years in Sing Sing (both 1932).
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1902
    Age 0
    Born on February 8, 1902.
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