Mae Clarke
Actor
Mae Clarke
Mae Clarke was an American actress most noted for playing Frankenstein's bride, chased by Boris Karloff in Frankenstein, and for having a grapefruit smashed into her face by James Cagney in The Public Enemy, both released in 1931.
Biography
Mae Clarke's personal information overview.
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News
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Years before Howard Keel starred on TV's Dallas, his musicals were more than OK! - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
The always fabulous Mae Clarke can be seen in the party scene in the uncredited role of Mrs. Adams. While Annie Get Your Gun was Keel's first American film, technically, his film debut was 1949's UK-produced, The Hideout, which didn't get released in
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Google News article
10 Most Jolting Movie Moments - Mania
Google News - over 5 years
The scene where he smashes a grapefruit in Mae Clarke's face is rightfully celebrated for its unspoken menace in an era where onscreen violence was verboten. But even more shocking is the finale where Cagney's Tom Powers finally gets his comeuppance
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Codebreakers at Film Forum - The L Magazine
Google News - over 5 years
Hampered by a moralistic ending and some rough matte work in its depiction of bombings, James Whale's 1931 take on Robert Sherwood's thrice-filmed play Waterloo Bridge nevertheless offers up a still-contemporary romance between prostitute Mae Clarke
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In praise of the grapefruit - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
James Cagney hurled one into Mae Clarke's face in a sexist rage in The Public Enemy. Now, however, our love affair with convenience has dampened our ardour for a fruit that must be sliced in half with its fleshy segments separated using a special knife
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Running on a full tank - Denton Record Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
In between, many recognizable, but often unnameable, character actors appear: Whit Bissell, Jerry Mathers (aka Beaver Cleaver), Myron McCormick, King Donovan, Carl “Alfalfa” Switzer, Nancy Kulp (The Beverly Hillbillies), Mae Clarke, Gloria Grahame,
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Joan B. Clarke - Staunton News Leader
Google News - over 5 years
Family members include three sons and daughters-in-law, Robert Jr., and Margaret Clarke of Chester, Stephen and Kary Clarke of Monroe, and Andrew and Terrie Mae Clarke of Charleston, SC; two sisters, Geni Bennetts of Napa, Calif., and Darleyne Moore of
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Servicio especial de Prensa Latina para planas de espectáculos - Prensa Latina
Google News - over 5 years
El clásico de ciencia ficción ha sido llevado en innumerables ocasiones al cine. Entre los largometrajes de mayor éxito se encuentra el que rodó en 1931 James Whale, con Colin Clive, Mae Clarke y Boris Karloff en los roles protagónicos
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David Randall: One day, my great-grandchildren, some of all this will be yours - The Independent
Google News - almost 6 years
The runners and riders included Pauline Mae Clarke, who had five sets of twins in the regulation time, but was disqualified on the grounds that several of them were illegitimate. The joint winners of this tasteless spectacle were Kathleen Ellen Nagle,
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Neil Before Thee - Las Vegas Review-Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
Or -- if you disrespect Cagney -- perhaps get smushed in the face with a grapefruit, a la Mae Clarke (in 1931's "The Public Enemy"). "Humphrey Bogart?" he asks. "I still don't know who he was." Contact reporter Steve Bornfeld at sbornfeld@
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Film Series and Movie Listings
NYTimes - almost 8 years
Film Series BREADLINES AND CHAMPAGNE (Friday through Thursday) Several rare titles are on tap for the final week of this Film Forum series devoted to movies of the Great Depression. First and foremost is Raoul Walsh's terrifically entertaining 1932 working-class comedy, ''Me and My Gal'' (Monday), with Spencer Tracy as a beat cop on the Lower East
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NYTimes article
Critic's Choice: New DVD's; Hollywood Treasures, Boxed, Tinned And Ready for Viewers
NYTimes - about 10 years
DVD distributors have been increasing their production of elaborate box sets in time for the holiday season, and as last-minute gifts -- they're easy to wrap! -- you can't really go wrong with a big fat bundle of classic movies. Here are some highlights from the last two months of box-set releases geared for movie fans. Television addicts may want
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NYTimes article
BOOKS OF THE TIMES; A Master at Making Gangsters Likable
NYTimes - about 19 years
CAGNEY By John McCabe Illustrated. 439 pages. Alfred A. Knopf. $29.95. If it's true that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then James Cagney must have been the most adulated movie star in the history of Hollywood. It's a safe bet that any mimic who has ever stood before a comedy-club audience, not to mention the countless party cutups
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NYTimes article
CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; At Wits' End: Algonquinites in Hollywood
NYTimes - about 24 years
BY 1935, Dorothy Parker had abandoned the life of a New York sophisticate for that of a Hollywood screenwriter, but the sunshine did nothing to mellow her caustic outlook. As she wrote in a letter back east to Alexander Woollcott, her friend from the old days of the Algonquin Round Table, "Aside from the work which I hate like holy water, I love it
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NYTimes article
Home Video
NYTimes - over 24 years
Tomorrow Disney is releasing "The Great Mouse Detective," a 1986 animated title starring a frisky sleuth named Basil of Baker Street. Distributors expect the tape, which is priced at $24.95, to sell about five million copies. Just as important, perhaps, the film is the first of a string of $25 movies that will be released this year by Disney and
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NYTimes article
Mae Clarke, 81, Actress in Variety Of Movies, Is Dead
NYTimes - almost 25 years
Mae Clarke, a film actress best remembered for the scene in which James Cagney pushed a grapefruit in her face in the 1931 gangster movie "Public Enemy," died on Wednesday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 81 years old and lived in Woodland Hills. She died of cancer, said Louella Benson, a hospital
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NYTimes article
Home Video
NYTimes - over 25 years
Finally, 'Fantasia' "Fantasia," the 1940 Disney animated classic, will be released tomorrow on cassette for the first time. It's a big title, certainly, but how big? "It will never outsell 'E.T.,' " said Ed Weiss, manager of the Movies Unlimited video stores in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Industry sources say about 9.3 million cassettes of
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mae Clarke
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1992
    Age 81
    Clarke died from cancer on April 29, 1992, at age 81, in Woodland Hills, California; she is buried in Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery.
    More Details Hide Details Notes Bibliography
  • THIRTIES
  • 1949
    Age 38
    In the early 1930s Clarke's face had been left partially scarred as a result of a car crash, recounts G. Mank in his Frankenstein film saga book It's Alive. (He also writes that Mae would attend Frankenstein fan club events during her senior years.) In 1949 Clarke was the female lead of Republic Pictures' 12-chapter movie serial King of the Rocket Men that introduced their popular atomic rocket-powered hero.
    More Details Hide Details In TV she acted in the series Perry Mason and Batman (episode 48). Clarke was married and divorced three times: to Lew Brice, Stevens Bancroft, and Herbert Langdon; she did not have children.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1910
    Born
    Born on August 16, 1910.
    More Details Hide Details
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