Mae Marsh
American actress
Mae Marsh
Mae Marsh was an American film actress with a career spanning over 50 years.
Biography
Mae Marsh's personal information overview.
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News
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Marcos históricos do western: 1950-1951 - Tribuna do Norte - Natal
Google News - over 5 years
Gregory Peck, Helen Wescott, Millard Mitchell, Jean Parker, Karl Malden, Skip Homier, Alan Hale Jr, Mae Marsh. (Along the Great Divide). Direção: Raoul Walsh. Produtor: Anthony Veiler. Roteiro (adaptado): Walter Doniger e Lewis Meltzer
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Marcos históricos do western: 1939-1949 - Tribuna do Norte - Natal
Google News - over 5 years
John Wayne, Pedro Armendariz, Harry Carey Jr, Ward Bond, Mae Marsh, Mildred Natwick, Jane Darwell, Bem Johnson. 1948 - CÉU AMARELO (Yellow Sky). Direção: William A. Wellman. Produtor: Lamar Trotti. Roteiro (adaptado): Lamar Trotti
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Lackawanna County Court Notes, 7/14/11 - Scranton Times-Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
... South Abington Twp., for $211000. n Barbara and Nicholas Logalbo, Anna Mae Marsh, Robert and Eden Smith, Earl and Julie Smith, Theresa Dorflinger, Ruth and Henry Skutnik, and Harold Jr. and Rosemary Warsden, Spring Brook Twp., to Robert H. Smith,
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THE LISTINGS; Movies
NYTimes - over 9 years
MOVIES Ratings and running times are in parentheses; foreign films have English subtitles. Full reviews of all current releases, movie trailers, show times and tickets: nytimes.com/movies. 'BLACK SHEEP' (No rating, 86 minutes) Angry sheep with an appetite for human flesh go on a rampage in New Zealand. What more can I say? (A. O. Scott) 'BRAND UPON
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MARKET PLACE; Is the Worst Really Over At A.I.G.?
NYTimes - almost 12 years
The accounting improprieties uncovered by the American International Group and disclosed to the public yesterday mean that the company's net worth will have to be reduced by $1.7 billion and that its annual financial report will be later than expected. But they also paint an unattractive picture of a company that during the last five years
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NYTimes article
SUMMER FILMS/RETROSPECTIVE; Swaggering Sexuality Before the Mandated Blush
NYTimes - almost 16 years
THEY were often called Lil or Lily, a moniker less redolent of a flower in its first white freshness than of the siren scent of a worldly wise broad -- especially when accompanied by a warning prefix. There was Marlene Dietrich's feather-bedecked adventuress in ''Shanghai Express.'' (''It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai
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Unbreakable Blossom
NYTimes - almost 16 years
LILLIAN GISH Her Legend, Her Life. By Charles Affron. Illustrated. 445 pp. New York: A Lisa Drew Book/Scribner. $35. CHARLES AFFRON admires Lillian Gish's life, as who does not? It is in most respects admirable, even exemplary, particularly in her refusal to surrender to old age. She started acting in 1902 when she was 9 years old and continued,
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MOVIE GUIDE
NYTimes - about 17 years
Here is a selective listing by critics of The Times of new or noteworthy movies and film series playing this weekend in New York City. * denotes a highly recommended film or series. Ratings and running times are in parentheses. An index of reviews of films opening today appears on Page 12. Now Playing *''ANY GIVEN SUNDAY,'' starring Al Pacino,
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - about 18 years
A sophisticated comedy, a graphic World War II story, a milestone of the silent screen and a tense melodrama are among the highlights of this week's films on television. Danny Kaye is in top form as a royal scapegoat in Norman Panama's COURT JESTER (1956). Set in Old England, this smooth spoof of knights and derring-do dispatches the comedian in
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MOVIED THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 18 years
A Japanese version of Shakespeare, urban suspense, , a macabre thriller and an excursion into American history furnish the highlights among films on television this week. RAN (1985) is ''King Lear'' filtered through the artistic sensibility of the great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa, Flawlessly cast, the picture is simple, steady, strong and
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - almost 19 years
Colorful backgrounds mark a cluster of choice films this week: long-ago Hollywood, the American frontier, the Sahara Desert and the diplomatic service. The original A STAR IS BORN (1937), William Wellman's said drama of a film colony marriage, is not a glittery as the Judy Garland remake, but in some ways it's even more golden, with Janet Gaynor as
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Theater in Review
NYTimes - almost 20 years
Silent Stars Come to Life In a Tribute by Students 'American Silents' Raw Space Something special is going on at Raw Space, but unfortunately it won't be there long. Playing through Sunday at 529 West 42d Street in Clinton, it's ''American Silents,'' an ambitious, inventive excursion into the early days of the American movie industry. Part history,
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NYTimes article
A Hemingway Story, and Just as Fictional
NYTimes - about 20 years
''A FAREWELL TO ARMS,'' Ernest Hemingway's masterpiece about a doomed World War I romance, is one of American literature's most enduring classics. Since it was first published in 1929, it has sold steadily, even during the 60's, after the author's death, when his literary fascination with violence caused his other works' popularity to drop.
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FILM; Griffith's 'Intolerance,' Given the Blush of Youth
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: Imagine an elephant as big as a brownstone, rearing back, straight up, on its hind legs. Place the pachyderm atop a column twice as high again. The column is on an arch, flanked by scores of stairs. Multiply by six, surround with stenciled walls taller than Times Square billboards, throw in a few more oversize elephants, sundry 10-foot lions
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NYTimes article
25 Cinematic Treasures
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: The Best Years of Our Lives (1946); director, William Wyler; starring Fredric March, Myrna Loy and Dana Andrews. American World War II veterans try to readjust to civilian life. Casablanca (1942); Michael Curtiz; Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains. Everybody comes to Rick's. Citizen Kane (1941); Orson Welles; Orson Welles,
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DIGITAL TV-CLEAR OUTLINES, SHARP DETAIL, TRUE COLOR
NYTimes - almost 32 years
''Digital'' has become a trendy buzz- word, redolent of the computer - the icon of our age. Calling anything digital implies praise and precision, even though the meaning of the term is rarely understood. Now that digital television is upon us, it may be well to recap its principles and their impact. In conventional methods of electronic imaging,
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THE MAKER OF THE MEDIUM
NYTimes - almost 33 years
D. W. GRIFFITH An American Life. By Richard Schickel. Illustrated. 672 pp. New York: Simon & Schuster. $24.95. By Peter Bogdanovich WHEN I asked Allan Dwan, the late pioneer picture maker who began directing in 1910 (and who continued into the early 60's), to describe in what ways he had been influenced by D. W. Griffith - who started making films
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES
NYTimes - almost 33 years
Richard Schickel. Illustrated. 672 pages. Simon & Schuster. $24.95. D.W. GRIFFITH, says Richard Schickel, was the first director to conceive of film as an art form and to develop a basic vocabulary or grammar of film, such as close-ups, cross-cutting and fadeouts. He was an ''auteur'' director who ''wrote'' with his camera. To a degree, he also
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NYTimes article
AT THE MOVIES; A loving look at the films of a pioneer.
NYTimes - about 34 years
ANYBODY in New York who's interested in film history can head down to the James Agee Room of the Bleecker Street Cinema through next Tuesday and take a look at an hourlong documentary called ''Before the Nickelodeon: The Early Cinema of Edwin S. Porter.'' ''Before the Nickelodeon,'' which was first seen one night last October at the New York Film
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NYTimes article
ANITA LOOS DEAD AT 93; SCREENWRITER, NOVELIST
NYTimes - over 35 years
Anita Loos, the screenwriter, playwright and novelist whose name was indissolubly linked with her book ''Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,'' died last night at Doctors Hospital in Manhattan. She was 93 years old. Miss Loos was admitted to the hospital Monday night after suffering a heart attack, according to her physician, Dr. Shepard G. Aronson. He said
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Mae Marsh
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1968
    Age 73
    They were married until her death, in 1968.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1955
    Age 60
    In 1955, Marsh was awarded the "George Eastman Award", given by George Eastman House for distinguished contribution to the art of film.
    More Details Hide Details Marsh returned from retirement to appear in "talkies" and played a role in Henry King’s remake of Over the Hill (1931). She gravitated toward character roles, and worked in this manner for the next several decades. Marsh appeared in numerous popular films, such as Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1932) and Little Man, What Now? (1934). She also became a favorite of director John Ford, appearing in The Grapes of Wrath (1940), How Green Was My Valley (1941), 3 Godfathers (1948), The Robe (1953), and The Searchers (1956). Marsh has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 1600 Vine Street.
  • FORTIES
  • 1941
    Age 46
    Her only brother, cinematographer Oliver Marsh, died in 1941.
    More Details Hide Details Her daughter, Marguerite Arms White, died in 2016 when she was 88 years old. Bibliography
  • THIRTIES
  • 1925
    Age 30
    Her sister Marguerite Marsh died in 1925 at the age of 37.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1918
    Age 23
    She married Sam Goldwyn's publicity agent Louis Lee Arms, in 1918 and bore three children with him.
    More Details Hide Details
    After her marriage to Lee Arms, a publicity agent for Goldwyn, in 1918, her film output decreased to about one per year.
    More Details Hide Details Marsh's last notable starring role was as a flapper for Griffith in The White Rose (1923) with Ivor Novello and Carol Dempster. She re-teamed with Novello for the film version of his hit stage play, The Rat (1925).
  • TEENAGE
  • 1906
    Age 11
    Her stepfather, oil-field inspector William Hall, could not have been killed in the 1906 earthquake, as he was alive, listed in the 1910 census, living with her mother, May née Warne, and sisters.
    More Details Hide Details Marsh worked as a salesgirl and loitered around the sets and locations while her older sister worked on a film, observing the progress of her sister’s performance. She first started as an extra in various movies, and played her first substantial role in the film Ramona (1910) at the age of 15. “I tagged my way into motion pictures,” Marsh recalled in The Silent Picture. “I used to follow my sister Marguerite to the old Biograph studio and then, one great day, Mr. Griffith noticed me, put me in a picture and I had my chance. I love my work and though new and very wonderful interests have entered my life, I still love it and couldn’t think of giving it up.” Marsh worked with D.W. Griffith in small roles at Biograph when they were filming in California and in New York. Her big break came when Mary Pickford, resident star of the Biograph lot and a married woman at that time, refused to play the bare-legged, grass-skirted role of Lily-White in Man's Genesis. Griffith announced that if Pickford would not play that part in Man’s Genesis she would not play the coveted title role in his next film, The Sands of Dee. The other actresses stood behind Pickford, each refusing in turn to play the part, citing the same objection.
    A frequently told story of Marsh's childhood is that her father, a railroad auditor, died when she was four. Her family moved to San Francisco, where her stepfather was killed in the great earthquake of 1906.
    More Details Hide Details Her great-aunt then took Mae and her older sister Marguerite to Los Angeles, hoping her show-business background would open doors for jobs at various movie studios needing extras.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1900
    Age 5
    However, her father, S. Charles Marsh, was a bartender, not a railroad auditor, and he was alive at least as late as June 1900, when Mae Marsh was nearly six.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1894
    Born
    Born on November 9, 1894.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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