Margaret Leighton
British actor
Margaret Leighton
Margaret Leighton was an English actress. She was known for her exquisite sense of grandeur and refinement. She created the role of Hannah Jelkes in Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana.
Biography
Margaret Leighton's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Margaret Leighton
News
News abour Margaret Leighton from around the web
Nether Regions 08.23.11: 7 Women - 411mania.com
Google News - over 5 years
The story unfolds in 1935 China, at the Unified Christian Mission, which is run by the stern Miss Agatha Andrews (Margaret Leighton). She believes that her idea of Christian piety is the proper way for everyone to live, and any straying from that
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Google News article
Joanne Woodward on TCM: RACHEL, RACHEL; SUMMER WISHES, WINTER DREAMS - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But despite its countless flaws, The Sound and the Fury should be watched at least once because of its cast: in addition to Woodward and the bizarrely cast Brynner, there are Margaret Leighton, Ethel Waters, Françoise Rosay, Jack Warden, Stuart Whitman
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Google News article
El legado de Michael Wilding en película - El Siglo de Torreón
Google News - over 5 years
En su vida sentimental, Wilding contrajo cuatro matrimonios con Kay (1937-1951); la glamorosa actriz Elizabeth Taylor, 20 años menor que él (1952-1957); Susan Neill (1958-1962); y la actriz Margaret Leighton (1964-1976). Con la bella Elizabeth,
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Google News article
THE BEST MAN: Sex Scandals and Politics at the Movies Pt. 3 - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Also in the Best Man cast: Edie Adams, Ann Sothern, Lee Tracy, Margaret Leighton, Kevin McCarthy, Shelley Berman, Gene Raymond, and Richard Arlen. The Best Man earned veteran Lee Tracy Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations in the Best Supporting
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Castro remembers Elizabeth Taylor, actress - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
With Margaret Leighton. (Tues., 5/31) Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) won Taylor, only 34, her second Oscar as the middle-aged harridan Martha. Richard Burton is husband George. Debuting director Mike Nichols triumphantly brought Edward Albee's
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Google News article
Sidney Michaels, 83, Author Of Hit Broadway Shows
NYTimes - almost 6 years
Sidney Michaels, a playwright who was nominated for Tony Awards in three consecutive seasons in the 1960s, died on April 22 in Westport, Conn. He was 83. His daughter-in-law, Jennifer Jennings, confirmed his death. Mr. Michaels had Alzheimer's disease. Mr. Michaels made a splash on Broadway in 1962 with his play ''Tchin-Tchin,'' an Americanized
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NYTimes article
Sidney Michaels dies at 83 - Variety
Google News - almost 6 years
The play, starring Margaret Leighton and Anthony Quinn, Americanized the French farce with a bittersweet touch as a couple ineptly seek to wreak revenge upon one another by having an affair. It received four Tony noms, including best play
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DVD REVIEW | 'THE NOëL COWARD COLLECTION'; For New Year's, a Party Where They Honor Noël Ca-ad
NYTimes - about 9 years
Thirty-one hours of Noël Coward is a bit much, like 31 profiteroles or 31 martinis. But taken in small doses, one bitter comedy or frothy farce at a time, Coward's work goes down easily. And some of it has surprising staying power. ''The Noël Coward Collection,'' recently released by BBC Video as a seven-disc DVD set ($79.98, unrated), contains
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NYTimes article
SUMMER DVD'S; The Loved One (1965)
NYTimes - almost 11 years
Even in a movie universe filled with strange and baldly unfaithful adaptations of literary works, Tony Richardson's 1965 version of Evelyn Waugh's satirical novel ''The Loved One'' stands apart: few other pictures reflect such a bizarre intersection -- maybe ''traffic jam'' is the better phrase -- of sensibilities. The script is by the bad-boy
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths HUNT, , WILLIAM MORRIS
NYTimes - over 13 years
HUNT--William Morris of Brookline, MA, on June 23, 2003. Harvard Class of 1936. Along with Robert Whitehead produced ''Much Ado About Nothing'' featuring Sir John Gielgud, Margaret Leighton and Jean Marsh; also produced ''Saint Joan'' with Siobhan McKenna, both in the 1950's. Lovingly remembered by his children, Elise Roselli of California,
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NYTimes article
Basil Langton, 91, Stage Actor, Director and Then Photographer
NYTimes - over 13 years
Basil Langton, a British-born actor, director and theater manager who had a long and successful career on both sides of the Atlantic, died on Thursday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 91. In World War II Mr. Langton founded the Traveling Repertory Theater, which toured Britain, performing in bombed cities, munitions factories and army camps. The
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NYTimes article
Max Reinhardt, 86, Publisher Of Shaw and Solzhenitsyn
NYTimes - about 14 years
The book publisher Max Reinhardt, who published works by George Bernard Shaw, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn and Graham Greene, died here on Tuesday. He was 86. Born in what is now Istanbul to Austrian parents, Mr. Reinhardt was educated at that city's English High School. He developed a love of British culture and in 1938 persuaded his parents to set
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NYTimes article
Anthony Quinn Dies at 86; Played Earthy Tough Guys
NYTimes - over 15 years
Anthony Quinn, whose six-decade acting career established the enduring image of a joyful primitive with a fierce passion for life, died yesterday at a Boston hospital. He was 86 and lived in Bristol, R.I., near Providence. The cause was respiratory failure, said a hospital spokeswoman. Although he appeared in perhaps 130 movies, Mr. Quinn was
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NYTimes article
MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - over 16 years
A STAR-STUDDED revival of Gore Vidal's 1960 stage comedy aobut a presidential convention opened at the Virginia Theater last month to some lovely reviews. The movie version of THE BEST MAN (1964), directed by Franklin Schaffner, has won its share of praise, too. Henry Fonda is the good guy, an intellectual liberal with integrity. Cliff Robertson is
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NYTimes article
THEATER; Nothing Matters, Only Style and Words
NYTimes - over 17 years
ALL the ages of classical and modern drama are ever ripe for re-invention. Transport Electra to post-Civil War New England, Richard III to Nazi Germany and Antigone to the battle of the homeless in contemporary New York. A theatrical distillation of ideas and feelings crosses time and cultural differences. But the transplanting or updating of Oscar
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The Love That's Forever: Making Matches
NYTimes - almost 18 years
ONE of the ''What if?'' games we movie lovers play is trying to imagine our favorite films cast with stars other than the ones whose names glittered on the marquee and lodged in our memories as irreplaceable. Think of ''Casablanca,'' then of Ronald Reagan and Ann Sheridan. Laughable? Nevertheless, they were the original team meant to play the
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NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - about 20 years
THIEVERY in Europe, coming of age in Indiana, romance in South America and class distinctions in Britain provide the themes for choice films on television this week. The entertainment starts early with THE BRAIN (1969) - no, not horror but a frantic, freewheeling crime farce. Lush European settings glide by as a gang of international crooks,
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NYTimes article
Charles Bowden, Broadway Producer, Dies at 83
NYTimes - about 20 years
Charles Bowden, a Broadway producer who presented ''The Night of the Iguana'' and other plays by Tennessee Williams and had a long professional association with Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, died on Sunday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan. He was 83. Mr. Bowden began as an actor and was also a director. He was chairman of the New
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NYTimes article
Peter Glenville, 82, a Director On Broadway and in London
NYTimes - over 20 years
Peter Glenville, a director who won accolades for his staging of plays in the West End of London as well as on Broadway, died on Monday at a friend's home in Manhattan, while on a visit from his home in San Miguel, Mexico. He was 82. Mr. Glenville, who was also a producer and an actor, achieved his primary renown in theater, but he was also active
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Margaret Leighton
    FIFTIES
  • 1976
    Age 53
    Died on January 13, 1976.
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  • 1974
    Age 51
    She was awarded the CBE in 1974. Leighton died of multiple sclerosis in 1976, aged 53, in Chichester, Sussex.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1966
    Age 43
    She had a noteworthy list of TV appearances, including Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Ben Casey and Burke's Law. She won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Drama for Hamlet (1970) and she was nominated for an Emmy in 1966 for Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Drama for four episodes of Dr. Kildare.
    More Details Hide Details Her last appearance on Broadway was as Birdie Hubbard in a revival of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1967) starring Anne Bancroft as Regina Giddens. For her film role as Mrs. Maudsley in The Go-Between (1970) Leighton won the British BAFTA Film Award for Best Supporting Actress. She received a BAFTA nomination for Best British Actress for her role as Valerie Carrington in Carrington V.C. (1955). She received a Hollywood Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for The Go-Between. Leighton had three husbands: publisher Max Reinhardt (1947–55); actor Laurence Harvey (1957–61); and actor Michael Wilding (1964–76), her death). She had no children.
  • 1964
    Age 41
    She portrayed the wife of an American presidential candidate (Henry Fonda) in the 1964 film The Best Man, written by Gore Vidal.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1938
    Age 15
    She began her career on stage in 1938, and went on to twice win the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play; for the original Broadway productions of Separate Tables (1956-57) and The Night of the Iguana (1961-62).
    More Details Hide Details Leighton's film appearances included Under Capricorn (1949), Calling Bulldog Drummond (1951), Carrington V.C. (1955) and The Best Man (1964). She won an Emmy Award in 1971 for a television version of Hamlet. She was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and won the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for the 1971 film The Go-Between. Born in Barnt Green, Worcestershire, Leighton made her stage debut as Dorothy in Laugh With Me (1938), which was also performed that year for BBC Television. She became a star of the Old Vic. Her Broadway debut was as the Queen in Henry IV (1946) starring Laurence Olivier and Ralph Richardson during a visit to America of the Old Vic company, which performed a total of five plays from its repertoire before returning to London.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Born
    Born on February 26, 1922.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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