Margaret Lindsay
Actor
Margaret Lindsay
Margaret Lindsay was an American film actress. Her time as a Warner Bros. contract player during the 1930s was particularly productive. She was noted for her supporting work in successful films of the 1930s and 1940s such as Jezebel (1938) and Scarlet Street (1945) and her leading roles in lower-budgeted B movie films such as the Ellery Queen series at Columbia in the early 1940s.
Biography
Margaret Lindsay's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Margaret Lindsay
News
News abour Margaret Lindsay from around the web
Pat O'Brien, 'Kill the Irishman' DVD reviews - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
When Rudy Vallee's touring bus crashes — Vallee is not in the picture, but lent his name to a banner on the side of the bus — and the crooner can't honor an important engagement at the Garden of the Moon, Quinn's gal Friday, Toni (Margaret Lindsay),
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DVD Extra: Pat, Buzz and Bacon - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Powell and Bette Davis both went on suspension rather than appear in this, so they were replaced by John Payne -- Warners shortly let him go to Fox so they could concentrate on Morgan -- and beautiful veteran stock player Margaret Lindsay,
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Ann Dvorak Movie Schedule: THREE ON A MATCH, OUR VERY OWN, COLLEGE COACH - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
(And for those who believe that remakes is something new: Three on a Mach was remade a mere six years later as Broadway Musketeers: John Farrow directed; Ann Sheridan, Marie Wilson, and Margaret Lindsay starred.) 6:00 AM CROONER (1932) A saxophone
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DVD Extra: Rediscovering RKO -- Grant, Lombard, Astaire, The Saint - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Today's Warner Archive releases include no fewer than eight new-to-DVD musicals, including Busby Berkeley's last under Warner contract, "The Garden of the Moon'' (1938) with Pat O'Brien, Margaret Lindsay...and John Payne, Jerry Colonna and Johnny
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Toronto Film Society-From Page to Screen Series - blogTO (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Joe May with George Sanders, Margaret Lindsay, Vincent Price There's no love lost between rival siblings when, grasping for the prize of the family mansion, one is framed for murder. Freely adapted from the gothic novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne,
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Google News article
Rudolph Peterson, 98, Chief Of Bank of America in 1960's
NYTimes - about 13 years
Rudolph A. Peterson, who was the chief executive of Bank of America in the 1960's and later ran the United Nations Development Program, died Dec. 2 at his home in Piedmont, Calif., his son-in-law, Stephen Bennett, said yesterday. He was 98. Mr. Peterson spent all of his 45 years in business as a lender. He began by making small loans to working
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ART REVIEW; Highland Highlights: Scottish Master Drawings
NYTimes - about 16 years
The National Gallery of Scotland, which was founded in Edinburgh in 1850 and opened its doors to the public in 1859, is introducing itself to New York with a beautiful, wide-ranging, thoughtfully selected exhibition of 70 master drawings. It's at the Frick Collection, and the pleasure is all ours. With works dating from the 16th to the 19th
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 19 years
A surprising version of a best-selling novel, an adroit caper about a Broadway producer, a festive musical and a darkly engrossing melodrama stand out on the television screen this week. As a novel, THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY earned Robert James Waller scant praise for the prose employed in his sentimental depiction of the four-day affair of a
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WEDDINGS;Ms. Hicks, Mr. de Peyster
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Julia Robinson Hicks, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hicks of Rye, N.Y., was married at her parents' home yesterday to Nicholas Lindsay Morris de Peyster, a son of James de Peyster Jr. of Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y., and Margaret Lindsay of Irvington, N.Y. The Rev. Edward Johnston performed the Episcopal ceremony. Mrs. de Peyster, 31, is the
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Bridge
NYTimes - about 23 years
A year ago James E. Cayne of Manhattan visited Shanghai to establish an office for Bear, Stearns Inc., the brokerage of which he is president and chief executive. Combining pleasure with business, he competed in a bridge tournament there, donated a Bear, Stearns trophy for Swiss Team play and won it himself. In Shanghai tomorrow he will defend this
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Reginald Malcolmson, Ex-Michigan Dean, 79
NYTimes - over 24 years
Reginald Malcolmson, professor emeritus of architecture and former dean of the University of Michigan's College of Architecture and Urban Planning, died on Monday at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor. He was 79 years old and lived in Ann Arbor. An announcement from the university said he died after a long illness. A native of Dublin,
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Meg Tozier to Wed in April
NYTimes - about 26 years
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Tozier of Long Valley, N.J., have announced April wedding plans for their daughter Margaret Lindsay Tozier and Robert Allan McDonald, a son of Mr. and Mrs. James T. McDonald of Garden City, L.I. Ms. Tozier, who is 33 years old and is known as Meg, graduated from Trinity University in San Antonio. She is a marketing manager in
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Music Noted in Brief; A Program of Arias In Soprano's Debut
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: Margaret Lindsay-Johnson's debut Sunday evening at Weill Recital Hall was a generous outpouring of spirit and lovely soprano tone. The Baltimore-based singer has that soaring, overtone-rich resonance and shimmering fast vibrato, and she is not afraid to put her heart into her singing. Margaret Lindsay-Johnson's debut Sunday evening at Weill
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Wallis Bleecker Dunckel; Banker, 86
NYTimes - about 29 years
LEAD: Wallis Bleecker Dunckel, the president of Bankers Trust Company from 1960 to 1966, died Thursday at Danbury (Conn.) Hospital after a brief illness. He was 86 years old and lived in Easton, Conn. Wallis Bleecker Dunckel, the president of Bankers Trust Company from 1960 to 1966, died Thursday at Danbury (Conn.) Hospital after a brief illness.
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FILM VIEW; Charting Stars Across the Decades
NYTimes - about 30 years
The death two weeks ago of Cary Grant, who was equally at ease in dinner clothes, a Salvation Army uniform or a solar topee, was a page-one reminder that, unlike Grant, the majority of today's real stars no longer have anything to do with movies. There are a handful of film giants still going strong - Clint Eastwood and Paul Newman, among others at
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FILM VIEW; VINTAGE PLOTTING PROPELS MACH II PLANES IN 'TOP GUN'
NYTimes - over 30 years
''He's a wild card - flies by the seat of his pants,'' says the senior officer of the brash young pilot in his command. ''He's completely unpredictable.'' The subject of this grudging admiration is Lieut. Pete Mitchell, nicknamed Maverick, in whom the reckless, romantic, elitist (all pilots are officers) spirit of nearly 60 years of military
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'PLACES IN THE HEART,' BENTON'S WAXAHACHIE IN THE DEPRESSION
NYTimes - over 32 years
OUT of the memories of his boyhood in Waxahachie, Tex., during the Great Depression, and within the unlikely tradition of the old-fashioned ''mortgage'' melodrama, Robert Benton has made one of the best films in years about growing up American. Its title is ''Places in the Heart,'' which is misleading in its sentimentality, for the film itself,
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Candace A. Cummins Becomes a Bride
NYTimes - almost 33 years
Candace Ann Cummins, a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. James B. Cummins of Far Hills, N.J., was married yesterday to Ethan M. Riegelhaupt, the son Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Riegelhaupt of Wellesley Hills, Mass. Judge Reginald Stanton of ew Jersey Superior Court performed the ceremony at the Cummins home. Margaret Lindsay Picotte was the maid of honor. Jonathan
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Katharine Lindsay Wed to S. R. Lake
NYTimes - over 35 years
The marriage of Katharine Hawes Lindsay, a reporter for The Daily News, to Stephen Randall Lake, director of marketing for the International Gold Corporation, took place yesterday at St. James Episcopal Church. The Rev. Hays Rockwell performed the ceremony. The parents of the couple are former Mayor John V. Lindsay and Mrs. Lindsay of New York and
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Margaret Lindsay
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1981
    Age 70
    Lindsay died at the age of 70 of emphysema in 1981 at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, survived by her four sisters and one brother.
    More Details Hide Details She was buried at Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California. Lindsay's sister, Jane Kies (1909–1985), was also an actress under the stage name Jane Gilbert. Lindsay's niece, Peggy Kenline, and great-nephew, Brad Yates, were also actors.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1950
    Age 39
    She made her television debut in 1950 in The Importance of Being Earnest, which allowed her to once again display her finely-honed British accent.
    More Details Hide Details More television work followed. Lindsay appeared in only four films during the 1950s and two in the 1960s. Her final feature film was Tammy and the Doctor (1963). Early in her career, Lindsay lived with her sister Helen in Hollywood. Later in life, she lived with her youngest sister, Mickie. She never married. According to biographer and historian William J. Mann, Lindsay was the life partner of musical theatre, film and television actress Mary McCarty (1923-1980), who predeceased Lindsay.
  • 1942
    Age 31
    Lindsay appeared in a supporting role in the 1942 film The Spoilers, starring John Wayne, and in Fritz Lang's Scarlet Street in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details While her work in the late 1940s would occasionally involve a supporting role in MGM films like Cass Timberlane with Spencer Tracy, her film career went into decline, with roles in films at Poverty Row studios like Monogram Pictures and PRC. She returned to the stage and co-starred with Franchot Tone in The Second Man.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1940
    Age 29
    In 1940, Jane Gilbert wed actor William Hopper, son of Hedda Hopper, best known for his role as Paul Drake in the Perry Mason television series.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had a daughter, Joan, in 1947.
    Perhaps Lindsay's most acclaimed film role was in The House of the Seven Gables in 1940, with George Sanders and Vincent Price.
    More Details Hide Details Directed by Joe May from a screenplay by Lester Cole, the film's musical score by Frank Skinner was nominated for an Academy Award. Price recalled that "Margaret Lindsay was a delight to work with and a very good actress." Michael Brunas, John Brunas and Tom Weaver wrote in Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-46 that Lindsay " one of the loveliest and most talented of '30s leading ladies, contributes a fine, mature performance that's probably the best, certainly the most striking, in the picture... had a Bette Davis played Hepzibah, this same performance would be hailed as a classic " In a 2004 Classic Images article about actor Jon Hall, film historian Colin Briggs wrote that a letter he had received from Lindsay indicated that her part in The House of the Seven Gables was her "favorite role." Lindsay's letter to Briggs also stated that the film she had the most fun with was 1947's The Vigilantes Return, in which she co-starred with Jon Hall. " That role was a complete departure from my usual parts and I grabbed it... I even warbled a Mae West type ditty. As a man-chasing saloon singer after Jon Hall it was for me a totally extroverted style and I relished the opportunity... I have a framed still from that film on a wall in my home."
  • 1934
    Age 23
    Lindsay co-starred with Bette Davis in four Warners films: as Davis's sister in 1934's Fog Over Frisco; in 1935's Dangerous (for which Davis won her first Best Actress Academy Award); in Bordertown, co-starring Paul Muni, and, lastly, as Davis's rival for Henry Fonda's affections in Jezebel (1938), which earned Davis her second Best Actress Academy Award.
    More Details Hide Details An example of her work in a leading role in lower budget films while at Warner Bros. was The Law in Her Hands (1936), a comedy in which she played a mob lawyer. As film historian John McCarty wrote, it was "that rarity among gangster films to offer a female in the male-dominated mouthpiece role." Author Roger Dooley identified the movie as "being the only film of the 1930s to concern itself with a pair of female legal partners". Made after the Motion Picture Production Code came into effect, however, The Law in Her Hands was forced into adopting "a reactionary stance towards the gender switch", and concluded with a plot twist that was the complete opposite of the Pre-Code period (1929–1934), when "female characters on the screen could say, do, and be whatever they wanted".
  • 1933
    Age 22
    Her work in Cavalcade earned her a contract at Warner Bros. where she became a reliable supporting player, working with Paul Muni, Errol Flynn, Henry Fonda, Warren William, Leslie Howard, George Arliss, Humphrey Bogart, Boris Karloff and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Lindsay was cast four times as the love interest of James Cagney in Warner films from 1933-1935.
    More Details Hide Details She appeared with Cagney in four films: Frisco Kid, Devil Dogs of the Air, G Men and Lady Killer.
  • 1932
    Age 21
    Lindsay was often mistaken as being British due to her convincing English accent, which impressed Universal Studios enough to sign her for their 1932 version of The Old Dark House.
    More Details Hide Details As James Robert Parish and William T. Leonard wrote in Hollywood Players: The Thirties (Arlington House, 1976), Lindsay returned to America and arrived in Hollywood, only to discover that Gloria Stuart had been cast in her role in the film. After some minor roles in Pre-Code films such as Christopher Strong and the groundbreaking Baby Face, which starred Barbara Stanwyck, Lindsay was cast in the Fox Film Corporation's award-winning Cavalcade. Lindsay was selected for a small but memorable role as Edith Harris, a doomed English bride whose honeymoon voyage takes place on the Titanic. She won the role by backing up her British accent with an elaborate "biography" that claimed she was born in a London suburb, the daughter of a London broker who sent her to a London convent for her education. "Although I looked and talked English... to tell them I was actually from Iowa would have lost the assignment for me," she later explained.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1930
    Age 19
    She graduated in 1930 from Visitation Academy in Dubuque.
    More Details Hide Details After attending National Park Seminary in Washington, D.C., Lindsay convinced her parents to enroll her at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York. She went abroad to England to make her stage debut. She appeared in plays such as Escape, Death Takes a Holiday, and The Romantic Age.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1910
    Born
    Born on September 19, 1910.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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