Margaret Suckley
American archivist
Margaret Suckley
Margaret Lynch Suckley was a distant cousin, intimate friend, and confidante of US President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as well as an archivist for the first American presidential library. She was one of four women at the Little White House with Roosevelt in Warm Springs, Georgia, when he died of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1945.
Biography
Margaret Suckley's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Margaret Suckley from around the web
Williams set for First Lady role? - Belfast Telegraph
Google News - over 5 years
Laura Linney is on board as Roosevelt's distant cousin and mistress Margaret Suckley, but whom he nicknamed Daisy. The historical drama, penned by Richard Nelson, centres on King George VI's visit to Hyde Park, the upstate New York home of the
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Google News article
Olivia Williams To Play The President's Wife - HeyUGuys.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Murray is to play FDR, and Linney will play his distant cousin and lover, Margaret Suckley. FDR was the only American president to be elected to office for more than two terms, being elected four consecutive times, from 1933 through to his death in
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Google News article
Bill Murray set to play Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 'Hyde Park on the Hudson' - Irish Central
Google News - almost 6 years
It was during this June weekend visit, that the scandalous love affair between President Roosevelt and his cousin Margaret Suckley aka Daisy becomes apparent. Bill Murray is the only actor cast in the movie so far, which will be directed by South
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Google News article
At the Home Of F.D.R.'s Secret Friend
NYTimes - over 9 years
ON a secluded bluff in Rhinebeck, N.Y., in one of the most beautiful spots overlooking the Hudson River, a 35-room Queen Anne mansion with a five-story turret is getting final touches on its first paint job since 1910. On one side, its rambling porch shines in bright maroon and green. On the other, where the painters and the grant money still
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NYTimes article
A Pied-à-Terre Designed By a President; F. D. R. Never Slept Here, But Entertained Dignitaries And Enjoyed Rendezvous
NYTimes - over 15 years
Franklin Delano Roosevelt was more than the nation's longest-serving president and wartime leader, social reformer, sailor, fisherman, dog lover and stamp collector in chief. He was also a budding architect in the tradition of Thomas Jefferson. For more than two years in the late 1930's, while grappling with the Depression and Fascist aggression,
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NYTimes article
Before He Became a Saint
NYTimes - over 21 years
LINCOLN By David Herbert Donald. Illustrated. 714 pp. New York: Simon & Schuster. $35. DAVID HERBERT DONALD began his distinguished career in 1948 with "Lincoln's Herndon," a life of Abraham Lincoln's law partner and early biographer, William Herndon, so comprehensive -- and so entertaining -- that no one has ever bothered to write Herndon up
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NYTimes article
Books for Vacation Reading
NYTimes - over 21 years
This list has been selected from books reviewed since the Christmas Books issue of December 1994 and suggests only high points in the main fields of reader interest. Books are arranged alphabetically under subject headings. Biographies and memoirs of people known for their contributions in fields other than literature and history are listed in
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NYTimes article
BEST SELLERS: April 23, 1995
NYTimes - almost 22 years
Weeks This Last On Week Week List Fiction 1 1 60 THE CELESTINE PROPHECY, by James Redfield. (Warner, $17.95.) An ancient manuscript, found in Peru, provides insights into achieving a fulfilling life. 2 2 44 POLITICALLY CORRECT BEDTIME STORIES, by James Finn Garner. (Macmillan, $8.95.) Classic tales respun to avoid offending current sensibilities. 3
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NYTimes article
BEST SELLERS: April 16, 1995
NYTimes - almost 22 years
Weeks This Last On Week Week List Fiction 1 1 59 THE CELESTINE PROPHECY, by James Redfield. (Warner, $17.95.) An ancient manuscript, found in Peru, provides insights into achieving a fulfilling life. 2 3 43 POLITICALLY CORRECT BEDTIME STORIES, by James Finn Garner. (Macmillan, $8.95.) Classic tales respun to avoid offending current sensibilities. 3
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Commemorating Roosevelt's Death, Democrats Praise His Legacy of Liberalism
NYTimes - almost 22 years
Fifty years ago today, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the visionary President who led the nation out of the shadow of the Great Depression to the brink of victory in history's first global war, died in this tiny spa southwest of Atlanta. Roosevelt had come here, as he did more than 40 times in his Presidency, seeking relief from the effects of the
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NYTimes article
BOOKS OF THE TIMES; A New Mirror on Roosevelt's Moods in the War
NYTimes - almost 22 years
CLOSEST COMPANION The Unknown Story of the Intimate Friendship Between Franklin Roosevelt and Margaret Suckley Edited and Annotated by Geoffrey C. Ward Illustrated. 444 pages. Houghton Mifflin. $24.95. Margaret Lynch Suckley first met Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the spring of 1922, when Roosevelt's mother invited the young woman to tea at her Hyde
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NYTimes article
A New Book Reveals Roosevelt's Bond With a Special Friend
NYTimes - almost 22 years
Shortly after Margaret Lynch Suckley died in 1991 at 99, a friend sorting through her crumbling Victorian mansion on the Hudson River here found a small black suitcase under the bed, marked, simply, "M.L.S." Inside the silk-lined suitcase, hundreds of letters and diary entries chronicled an affectionate, longstanding relationship between Miss
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NYTimes article
Hudson Mansion
NYTimes - over 23 years
To the Editor: On a Hudson Valley Heritage expedition sponsored by Mohonk Mountain House, my husband and I visited Margaret Suckley at Wilderstein, a year before she died at 99. , William Weaver describes the very qualities we felt distinguished Wilderstein from other mansions open to the public. Mr. Weaver describes a first impression of "a
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NYTimes article
Margaret Suckley, 99, Archivist And Aide to Franklin Roosevelt
NYTimes - over 25 years
Margaret L. Suckley, an aide and confidante of Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II and an archivist at the nation's first Presidential Library at Hyde Park, N.Y., died on Saturday at Wilderstein, her home in Rhinebeck, N.Y. She was 99 years old. She died of congestive heart failure, her family said. Miss Suckley, who was known as Daisy, was a
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NYTimes article
VISITS TO HUDSON MANSION
NYTimes - about 32 years
One of the most distinctive Hudson River mansions, Wilderstein, in Rhinebeck, N.Y., opens to the public this month for the first time since it was built in 1853. Wilderstein, which is in the National Register of Historic Places, is one of the estates on the east bank of the Hudson River in a 16-mile stretch that is part of a historic district. Its
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Margaret Suckley
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1991
    Age 99
    Died in 1991.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1945
    Age 53
    She was one of the four women with Roosevelt in his house, the Little White House, in Warm Springs, Georgia, when he died of cerebral hemorrhage in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details The exact nature of their relationship is unknown, although there is considerable evidence that their relationship was at least intellectually, if not physically, intimate, and it became widely known on the discovery after her death of thousands of pages of notes, diary entries, and letters in a black suitcase under her bed. She gave Roosevelt his dog Fala, and wrote a children's book on the dog. One of the rare photographs of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in a wheelchair was taken by her. During World War II, Daisy often stayed for long visits at the White House, keeping the President company on quiet evenings. Yet she seems to have been routinely dismissed, even by many historians, as the dowdy cousin who worked on the family papers. Miss Suckley was not considered to be very beautiful, and she often referred to herself as "playing the part of the prim spinster," however, notably romantic overtones are found in many of the letters written to her by FDR. There is no credible evidence that Roosevelt had any affairs after Lucy Mercer during World War I, but he had many close female friends, whose company and appreciation he relied on to lighten his load and buoy his spirits—and Daisy, as she was known, was a key member of this small circle. Roosevelt’s apparent instructions to Miss Suckley to burn at least some of the letters he wrote to her have resulted in suspicions, but perhaps FDR's great flair for dramatics exaggerates what we read into them and there is no doubt that Daisy was one of the only handful of people who didn't want anything from him and he could be completely relaxed with.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1891
    Born
    Generally called 'Daisy' by those who knew her, she was born December 20, 1891 at Wilderstein in the Hudson Valley, and died June 29, 1991 in Rhinebeck, New York, after living to nearly 100 years old.
    More Details Hide Details She was a neighbor and sixth cousin of President Roosevelt.
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