Maria al-Qibtiyya
Sahabah
Maria al-Qibtiyya
Maria al-Qibtiyya, or Maria the Copt, (died 637) was an Egyptian Coptic Christian slave who was sent as a gift from Muqawqis, a Byzantine official, to the Islamic prophet Muhammad in 628. . Many sources, including Ibn Qayyim Al-Jawziyya claim that she was only a concubine. She is also not mentioned in Ibn-Hisham's notes on Ibn-Ishaqs biography where he lists the wives of Muhammad. She was the mother of Muhammad's son Ibrahim, who died in infancy.
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    CHILDHOOD
  • 6370
    Died in 637.
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  • 6320
    Maria never married after Muhammad's death in 632, and died five years later.
    More Details Hide Details Her birthdate is unknown. No primary source mentions her age. In the Islamic year 6 AH (627 – 628 CE), Muhammad is said to have had letters written to the great rulers of the Middle East, proclaiming the new faith and inviting the rulers to join. What purports to be texts of some of the letters are found in Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari's History of the Prophets and Kings, which was written some 250 years after the events it chronicled. Tabari writes that a deputation was sent to an Egyptian governor named as al-Muqawqis. Tabari recounts the story of Maria's arrival from Egypt: Multiple Scholars and authors have mentioned Maria al-Qibtiyya as one of the concubines (out of four) of Muhammad. Maria is mentioned with detail in Martin Lings Muhammad: His Life Based on the Earliest Sources. Martin Lings is known as Abu-Bakar Sirajuddin as he converted to Islam. According to the Biography:
  • 6280
    Maria al-Qibtiyya (alternatively, "Maria Qupthiya"), or Maria the Copt, (died 637) was an Egyptian Coptic Christian slave who was sent as a gift from Muqawqis, a Byzantine official, to the Islamic prophet Muhammad in 628.
    More Details Hide Details Many sources, including Ibn Qayyim Al-Jawziyya claim that she was only a concubine. She is also not mentioned in Ibn-Hisham's notes on Ibn-Ishaq's biography where he lists the wives of Muhammad. She was the mother of Muhammad's son Ibrahim, who died in infancy. Her sister, Sirin, was also sent to Muhammad. Muhammad gave her to his follower Hassan ibn Thabit.
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