Maria Montez
Actress, author
Maria Montez
Maria Montez was a Dominican-born motion picture actress who gained fame and popularity in the 1940s as an exotic beauty starring in a series of filmed-in-Technicolor costume adventure films. Her screen image was that of a hot-blooded Latin seductress, dressed in fanciful costumes and sparkling jewels. She became so identified with these adventure epics that she became known as "The Queen of Technicolor.
Biography
Maria Montez's personal information overview.
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Flaming Jack – Jack Smith el'arte del fallimento - Paperblog
Google News - over 5 years
Parodia estrema del divismo hollywoodiano, mai abbastanza nostalgico e decadente (uno degli attori-corpi era Mario Montez, un transgender del futuro Mario Banana di Warhol, omaggiato del nome della diva del dopoguerra Maria Montez), un immaginario
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Death notices, 8/17 - San Angelo Standard Times
Google News - over 5 years
Survivors include his wife, Jovita Gutierrez; siblings Maria Montez, Torevia Minjarez and Cruz Gutierrez; and children Modesto Gutierrez Jr., Henry Gutierrez, Diana Duhn, Olga Moya and Yolanda Huerta. COMFORT - Severiana Cruz Garcia, 92, died Monday,
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Law & Order - Times Daily
Google News - over 5 years
Maria Montez Hanback, 24, Florence; second-degree theft of property and fraudulent use of a credit card. Brittany Lynn Hammond, 20, 23977 Ben Stanford Road, Athens; obstructing justice using a false identification. Jessica Deann Wingo, 28,
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Hollywood'ta Türk izleri - Milliyet
Google News - over 5 years
O yıllarda Dominik kökenli Maria Montez ile iyi bir ikili oluşturdu. Filmlerin dışında pek çok dizide de rol aldı. 12 bölümden oluşan "Junior G-Men of the Air" (1942), 13 bölümden oluşan "Adventures of Smilin' Jack" (1943) dizilerinde oynadı
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Vivien Leigh, Ronald Colman, Kathryn Grayson, Arab Magicians on TCM: Arabs in ... - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Mr./Ms. TCM, no Turhan Bey, Sabu, Maria Montez, Jon Hall Easterns? As much as I like Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr (both star in Dream Wife), the highlights of TCM's "Arab" evening as far as I'm concerned are two B movies that I haven't watched,
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DVR Alert: TCM presents 'Arabs as a subject of ridicule' - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
But rather incredibly, not a single Maria Montez movie this month. LOU LUMENICK Lou Lumenick, a native of Astoria, Queens who's been covering movies since 1981, is The Post's chief film critic. He's covered the Cannes, Toronto, Sundance and New York
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Mit şi sexualitate - Cinema-ul underground al anilor '60: Japonia vs. SUA - Liternet
Google News - over 5 years
Actorul, pe numele lui adevărat Rene Rivera, şi-a creat pseudonimul ca un tribut pentru Maria Montez. Un actor devenit personaj de cult prin îndatorirea la un alt asemenea actor - rămân de analizat contextele diferite, cât şi intenţiile diferite,
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Marrakech Café sweetens up - Pitch Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
And in the Marrakech Café, it's easy to give in to the romance of a country that has inspired great poets and several classic American movies: Morocco with Marlene Dietrich, Tangier with Maria Montez and Sabu, and Casablanca. The Kamal brothers hired
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Jack Smith and the Aesthetics of Camp in an Era of Political Correctness - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
Here was a queer who dared to enter the macho confines of avant-garde cinema to project scenes of transvestites acting out silent movie fantasies of themselves as Marlene Dietrich or Maria Montez. Fifty years later, Smith can be seen as having raised
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HURRAH FOR TURKEYS! - NewsTime
Google News - over 5 years
When asked in an interview about the “greatest trash movie” ever, Pauline Kael waxed quite nostalgic about “Cobra Woman”, a work in which a high-heeled, bare-midriffed Maria Montez utters lines like “Fire mountain grows more angry. I need more gold”,
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Detienen cinco con 4 paquetes de coca en Villa Juana - El Nuevo Diario (República Dominicana)
Google News - over 5 years
ME SORPRENDE MUCHO QUE ESTOS ELEMENTOS ESCOGIERAN ESE LUGAR, LA CALLE MARIA MONTEZ ESQ. PEÑA BATLE, ESA ES UNA INTERSECCION MUY CONCURRIDA Y DE MUCHO MOVIMIENTOS, HAY LE SALIO LA PALOMERIA QUE ESTOS TIPOS LLEVAN DENTRO, DEBIERON DE HABER SIDO UN POCO
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Also Out This Week
NYTimes - over 7 years
KNOWING From the director Alex Proyas (''The Crow'') comes this tale of an astrophysicist (Nicolas Cage) who uncovers a prophecy of global destruction in 2009. The clock is ticking. With Rose Byrne. ''The draggy, lurching two hours of 'Knowing' will make you long for the end of the world,'' A. O. Scott wrote in The New York Times in March. (Summit
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CRITIC'S CHOICE; New DVDs: Carmen Miranda
NYTimes - over 8 years
THE CARMEN MIRANDA COLLECTION Did Carmen Miranda invent performance art? Born in Portugal to middle-class parents who moved to Brazil when she was still an infant, Miranda merged her talents as a samba singer with a flair for designing hats (acquired during an apprenticeship in a Rio de Janeiro milliner's shop), creating an outlandish persona that
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Hot Properties
NYTimes - about 9 years
THE STAR MACHINE By Jeanine Basinger. Illustrated. 586 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $35. ''God makes stars,'' the pioneering movie producer Samuel Goldwyn once said. ''It's up to producers to find them.'' In this era of D.I.Y. stardom, you don't need God or Goldwyn to grab your 15 minutes; you need only a Webcam and the minor technological wherewithal to
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HOUSE PROUD; Kings' Riches in a Chelsea Domain
NYTimes - about 9 years
THERE are designers who proudly haunt thrift shops and tag sales, but Thomas Hays, an investment banker turned interior designer who has just redone a boutique hotel in Marrakesh, Morocco, is not one of them. High-toned antiques dealers and his own far-flung travels are the source of the treasures in his Chelsea penthouse, and if you're curious
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FILM REVIEW; An Artist's Underground Flowering
NYTimes - almost 10 years
It's gratifying when an influential underground artist is profiled in an accessible, entertaining documentary. For that reason alone, Mary Jordan's film ''Jack Smith and the Destruction of Atlantis,'' whose subject is an antiestablishment director, is worth seeing -- even though Ms. Jordan dices Mr. Smith's films into snippets that don't convey
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Critic's Choice: New DVD's
NYTimes - about 10 years
All Quiet on the Western Front The Oscar winner for best picture of 1930, Lewis Milestone's ''All Quiet on the Western Front,'' established the template for many of the Oscar winners in the years since. Based on an internationally best-selling novel by Erich Maria Remarque, adapted to the screen by a variety of literary and theatrical figures,
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THEATER REVIEW; Sometimes A Nightingale Emerges
NYTimes - over 10 years
''Da-da-da-da-dum.'' Not exactly a phrase that gleams with Shakespearean eloquence, is it? But once you've heard Christine Ebersole sing it -- and believe me, this is an experience no passionate theatergoer should miss -- ''da-da-da-da-dum'' is guaranteed to enter your personal memory bank of cherished quotations, the kind you summon when you're
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Art in Review; Bec Stupak/Honeygun Labs
NYTimes - about 11 years
Radical Earth Magic Flower Deitch Projects 76 Grand Street, SoHo Through Feb. 25 Bec Stupak first emerged as a popular V.J. on the 1990's rave scene and is known in certain parts of the art world, with her Honeygun Labs collective, as the source of the remarkable videos in the psychedelic installations of Assume Vivid Astro Focus. Now she and
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Maria Montez
    THIRTIES
  • 1951
    Age 38
    The 39-year-old Montez died in Suresnes, France on 7 September 1951 after apparently suffering a heart attack and drowning while taking a hot bath.
    More Details Hide Details She was buried in the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris where her tombstone gives her amended year of birth (1918), not the actual year of birth (1912). She left the bulk of her $200,000 estate to her husband and their five year old daughter. Shortly after her death, a street in the city of Barahona, Montez's birthplace, was named in her honor. In 1976, Margarita Vicens de Morales publishes a series of articles in the Dominican newspaper Listín Diario, in its magazine called Suplemento, where she presented the results of the research she was carrying out in order to get to the real-life story of Montez. The research culminated in 1992 with the publication of the biography Maria Montez, Su Vida. After the first edition, a second edition was published in 1994 and a third in 2004.
  • 1949
    Age 36
    In 1949 Aumont announced they would get divorced but they remained together until her death.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1949 it was announced she would make The Queen of Sheba with Michael Redgrave for director Francois Villiers; however the film was not made.
    More Details Hide Details Instead Montez and Aumont made Wicked City (1949) for Christina Productions with Villiers directing and Aumont contributing to the script. Portrait of an Assassin (1949) co-starred Arletty and Eric Von Stroheim. At the time of her death, Montez's US agent Louis Shurr was planning her return to Hollywood in a film to be made for Fidelity Pictures, Last Year's Show. Montez was married twice. Her first marriage was to William G. McFeeters, a wealthy banker who served in the British army. They married when Montez was 17 years old and later divorced. For over a year she was reportedly engaged to Claude Strickland, a flight officer with the RAF who she met in New York. However it was later revealed that this was a publicity stunt.
  • 1947
    Age 34
    In 1947 Hedda Hopper announced Montez and her husband would make The Red Feather about Jean Lafitte.
    More Details Hide Details She was also announced for Queen of Hearts – this time not the Elizabeth of Austria project but an adaptation of a European play by Louis Verneuil, Cousin from Warsaw. Neither film was made; instead Montez and Aumont appeared in a fantasy adventure, Siren of Atlantis (1948), which proved unsuccessful at the box office in the US (although it performed respectfully in Europe). Montez's fee was $100,000; she later successfully sued the producer for $38,000 in unpaid money. She and Aumont formed their own production company, Christina Productions. She and Aumont moved to a home in Suresnes, Île-de-France in the western suburb of Paris under the French Fourth Republic. There, Montez appeared in several films and a play written by her husband. She also wrote three books, two of which were published, as well as penning a number of poems.
    In August 1947 Universal refused to pick up their option on Montez' services and she went freelance.
    More Details Hide Details Montez sued Universal for $250,000 over the billing issue; the matter was settled out of court.
    In April 1947 Montez was borrowed by Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. to appear in the sepia-toned swashbuckler The Exile (1948), directed by Max Ophüls, produced by Fairbanks but released by Universal.
    More Details Hide Details Fairbanks Jr says Montez wanted to play the role over the objections of Universal; she later insisted on top billing despite the small nature of the role.
  • 1944
    Age 31
    In 1944 Montez the secret to her success was that she was "sexy but sweet...
    More Details Hide Details I am very easy to get along with. I am very nice. I have changed a lot during the last year. I have outgrown my old publicity. I used to say and do things to shock people. That was how I became famous. But now it is different. First the public likes you because you're spectacular. But after it thinks you are a star it wants you to be nice. Now I am a star, I am nice." Montez said she was "tired of being a fairy tale princess all the time" and wanted to learn to act. She fought with Universal for different parts. "Sudan is making more money than the others and Universal thinks on that account I should appear in more of these films," she said. "But I want to quit these films when they are at a peak, not on the downbeat. It isn't only that the pictures are all the same, but the stories are one just like the other."
  • 1943
    Age 30
    In Dominican Republic she received the decoration with the Order of Juan Pablo Duarte in the Grade of Officer and the Order of Trujillo in the same grade, which was given by the dictator Rafael Leonidas Trujillo in November, 1943.
    More Details Hide Details In 1944 she was promoted as Goodwill Ambassador of Latin American countries to the United States in the so-called Good Neighbor policy. The authors Terenci Moix and Antonio Perez Arnay wrote a book entitled Maria Montez. The Queen of Technicolor that recounted her life and reviewed her films. CERTV studies, Dominican television channel, bears her name, as well as a street in the city of Barahona, her birthplace, was named in her honor. The Dominican painter Angel Haché included in his collection "Tribute to Film", a trilogy of Maria Montez and another Dominican painter, Adolfo Piantini, who dedicated in 1983, an exhibit to the actress that included 26 paintings which were made in different techniques. In 2012, they put her name to a train station of the Line 2 of the Metro of Santo Domingo. In March, the Casandra Awards 2012 was dedicated to Maria Montez for the centenary of her birth.
    While working in Hollywood, she met French actor Jean-Pierre Aumont. They married on 14 July 1943 at Montez's home in Beverly Hills.
    More Details Hide Details Aumont had to leave a few days after their wedding to serve in the Free French Forces fighting against Nazi Germany in the European Theatre of World War II. Charles Boyer was Aumont's best man and Jannine Crispin was matron of honour. At the end of World War II, the couple had a daughter, Maria Christina (also known as Tina Aumont), born in Hollywood on 14 February 1946.
    In 1943 Montez was awarded two medals from the Dominican government for her efforts in promoting friendly relations between the US and her native land.
    More Details Hide Details Universal wanted three more movies starring Montez, Hall and Sabu. However Sabu was drafted into the army and so was replaced by Turhan Bey in Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1944) with Montez and Hall. This trio were meant to reunite in Gypsy Wildcat (1944), but Bey was required on another movie and ended up being replaced by Peter Coe. Sudan (1945) starred Montez, Hall and Bey - with Bey as Montez' romantic interest this time. Flame of Stamboul was another proposed Hall-Bey-Montez film but it was postponed. Universal announced that Montez would play Elizabeth of Austria in The Golden Fleece, based on a story by Bertita Harding, but it was not made. She also appeared in Follow the Boys, Universal's all-star musical, and Bowery to Broadway.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1942
    Age 29
    She claimed in 1942 she was making $250 a week.
    More Details Hide Details Arabian Nights was a prestigious production for Universal, shot in Technicolor, produced by Walter Wanger and starring Montez, Jon Hall and Sabu. The resulting movie was a big hit and established Montez as a star. Montez wanted to portray Cleopatra but instead Universal reunited her with Hall and Sabu in White Savage (1943) and Cobra Woman (1944). All the films were popular.
  • 1941
    Age 28
    In June 1941 her contract with Universal was renewed.
    More Details Hide Details Montez graduated to leading parts with South of Tahiti, co-starring Brian Donlevy. She also replaced Peggy Moran in the title role of The Mystery of Marie Roget (1942). Public response to South of Tahiti was enthusiastic enough for the studio to cast Montez in her first starring part, Arabian Nights.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1912
    Born
    Born on June 6, 1912.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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