Maria of Montferrat
Queen of Jerusalem
Maria of Montferrat
Maria of Montferrat (1192–1212) was Queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Conrad of Montferrat and Isabella, Queen of Jerusalem. She was known in her youth as The Marquise, because of her father's title.
Biography
Maria of Montferrat's personal information overview.
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Timeline
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    TWENTIES
  • 1212
    Age 20
    In 1212, Maria of Montferrat gave birth to a daughter, Isabelle (1212–1228) or Yolande, but died shortly afterwards, probably from puerperal fever.
    More Details Hide Details John retained the crown but only as regent on behalf of his daughter who married (in 1225) to Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor. The lineage of Maria died out in 1268, with the death of her great-grand-grandson Conradin (or Conrad III of Jerusalem), he was executed in southern Italy on the orders of Charles of Anjou, who took the Kingdom of Sicily. After him, the descendants of Maria's younger half-sister (Alice of Champagne) inherit her kingdom.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1210
    Age 18
    The marriage was celebrated on September 4, 1210, then the couple were crowned King and Queen of Jerusalem on October 3, 1210 in Tyre Cathedral.
    More Details Hide Details John continued the peace policy of John of Ibelin.
  • 1209
    Age 17
    In 1209, Maria was seventeen the regency expired, so the government believed it best for Maria to marry so she could secure her post as queen.
    More Details Hide Details The assembly of barons and prelates decided to seek advice from Philip II of France, who offered one of his followers, John of Brienne. However John was not a very rich man. To overcome his lack of fortune and to enable him to fund his sovereign obligations (court and army) King Philip and Pope Innocent III each paid him the sum of 40 000 livres.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1197
    Age 5
    Henry II of Champagne died in 1197, from this marriage Maria had gained three half-sisters.
    More Details Hide Details Amalric II of Cyprus married Isabella, he became joint ruler of Jerusalem with Isabella. He died on April 1, 1205. Isabella died shortly thereafter and Marie became queen of Jerusalem, at the age of thirteen, while her stepbrother Hugh, from the first marriage of Amalric, became King of Cyprus and married Maria's half-sister, Alice of Champagne. The half-brother of her mother, John of Ibelin, the Old Lord of Beirut, acted as regent on behalf of Maria, wisely and to the satisfaction of the inhabitants of the kingdoms. Failing to conduct operations to reconquer the territories lost in 1187, he maintained the kingdom within its limits, a policy of peace with Al-Adil I, brother of Saladin, who had come to his estate by eliminating the other heirs.
  • 1192
    Age 0
    Born in 1192.
    More Details Hide Details
    Maria, the posthumous child was born during the summer of 1192.
    More Details Hide Details
    On April 28, 1192, while the rivalry between Guy de Lusignan and Maria's father was about to find a term and Richard I of England was about to finish Third Crusade and return to England, Conrad was assassinated.
    More Details Hide Details Her mother remarried in haste on May 5 to Henry II, Count of Champagne, nephew of King Richard and Philip II of France. At the time of the wedding, Isabella was already visibly pregnant with Maria.
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