Marion Davies
Actress, producer, screenwriter
Marion Davies
Marion Davies was an American film actress, best known for her relationship with newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst. Davies was already building a reputation as a popular film comedienne when Hearst took over her career, promoting her heavily through his newspapers, and pressuring the studios to cast her in historical dramas to which she was not suited.
Biography
Marion Davies's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Marion Davies
News
News abour Marion Davies from around the web
Two new books explore the history of SLO County - San Luis Obispo Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
Descriptions of clamming and swimming in the Pacific Ocean are mixed with her memories of encounters with actress Marion Davies, Indian spiritual leader Meher Baba and Gavin Arthur, the grandson of former President Chester A. Arthur
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'Lord of Rings' star wants to sell - MiamiHerald.com
Google News - over 5 years
The former Beverly Hills residence of actress Marion Davies has sold for $9262500. Built in 1923, the 6024-square-foot home sits on 1.5 acres with mature trees and a pool. Features include a two-story entry, a step-down paneled living room with leaded
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A mystery that travelled from England and Wales to Kurri - The Maitland Mercury
Google News - over 5 years
Researcher Marion Davies has taken on the task of helping Mrs Montague solve her family's mystery and is calling for anyone who may have any information to contact her. “In the letter John told of a holiday, which he and his wife Ivy had just spent,”
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Fighting the curse of the bucolic Desert Inn - The Desert Sun
Google News - over 5 years
He worked for the inn's founder, Nellie Coffman, until her death in 1950, and for her sons, Earl Coffman and George Roberson, until they sold it in 1955 to Marion Davies, a silent movie star and mistress of the late newspaper mogul William Randolph
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Santa Monica Rep Kicks Up a Storm with “The Tempest” - The Lookout News
Google News - over 5 years
In staging “The Tempest” – reputed to be the Bard's last solo writing venture – at the Marion Davies' Beach House, director Jen Bloom decided to cast the Southern Gothic, architecturally static venue as another character, nimbly capitalizing on the
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Elijah Wood puts Santa Monica on market - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
The former Beverly Hills residence of actress Marion Davies has sold for $9262500. Built in 1923, the 6024-square-foot home sits on 1.5 acres with mature trees and a swimming pool. Features include a two-story entry, a step-down paneled living room
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Marion Davies, Gary Cooper in "Operator 13" - Hartford Courant
Google News - over 5 years
Marion Davies always will be remembered as the mistress of William Randolph Hearst and the inspiration for the character of Susan Alexander in "Citizen Kane," a light entertainer pushed beyond her capabilities by her domineering husband
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Adult Night at the Annenberg Beach House - The Lookout News
Google News - over 5 years
By Lookout Staff August 9, 2011 – When it was first built in the 1920's, the Marion Davies Estate was an ideal place to view the Pacific sunset while lounging by the pool and listening to the latest band. It still is. Adults are invited to recreate the
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Marion Davies' Beverly Hills Mansion Sold For $9.3 Million - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
The Beverly Hills mansion once owned by renowned actress Marion Davies has just sold to a real estate professional for $9.3 million. The Huffington Post Los Angeles wrote about the house when it was first listed for $12.5 million in September of last
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CITY ROOM; On the Market, a Building That Sleeps Eight. Forever.
NYTimes - over 5 years
For sale: 101-year-old Greek Revival building in landmark area. Top-quality granite exterior, marble interior, high ceiling, custom-made window by famous artist. Immediate occupancy: vacant since the 1950s. Sleeps eight. Asking $750,000. Standing on the threshold, Susan Olsen explained that the price did not include putting the buyer's name above
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On This Day in History: July 27 Makes Good As a Cover Boy - Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
This explains how Fisher came to paint many portraits of Hearst's mistress, movie star Marion Davies. Fisher's main stock in trade was the portrait of an idealized “girl,” typically in elaborate dress, with a haughty gaze and a Mona Lisa Smile
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Heartbreak and True Love Amid Ukueles and Jazz - New York Press
Google News - over 5 years
Presented by the perennially ambitious The Transport Group, The Patsy is a one-man adaptation of a 1925 three-act comedy now best known as the basis for a 1928 Marion Davies film; Jonas is a new, brief, highly theatrical monologue about the powers of
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Star maker: the photographer Ruth Harriet Louise - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
The same year Louise started working with Garbo, she met Marion Davies, the mistress of the publisher William Randolph Hearst, and they became friends. She spent days with Davies at the star's Santa Monica beach house and took informal shots of her
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Tabloid Readers' Perverse Shocker! - Winnipeg Free Press
Google News - over 5 years
His larger-than-life status, in addition to his very public affair with Marion Davies, a Ziegfled Follies singer and dancer who was 34 years his junior, made him the perfect archetype as the flawed capitalist character for Orson Well's highly praised
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The Listings
NYTimes - over 5 years
Theater Approximate running times are in parentheses. Theaters are in Manhattan unless otherwise noted. Full reviews of current shows, additional listings, showtimes and ticket information: nytimes.com/theater. Previews And Openings 'All New People' (in previews; opens on Monday) After branching out as a writer-director with his well-received 2004
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Theater Listings July 22 — 28 - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Best known through King Vidor's silent screen version, which starred Marion Davies and Marie Dressler, this play about a social-climbing family in pre-Depression America has been adapted as a single-performer vehicle to showcase the protean gifts of
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Lafayette Hotel - San Diego Reader
Google News - over 5 years
The room was dismantled and shipped to the US in 1926 to serve as a beach house for actress Marion Davies. The lounge opened in its current location in 1967 and now features piano entertainment and dinner seven nights a week. With its wine-red leather
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Marion Davies
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1961
    Age 64
    Davies died of stomach cancer on September 22, 1961, in her home in Hollywood, California.
    More Details Hide Details Her funeral at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Hollywood was attended by 200 people and many Hollywood celebrities, including Mary Pickford, Charles "Buddy" Rogers, Mrs. Clark Gable (Kay Spreckels), and Johnny Weissmuller. She is buried in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Davies left an estate estimated at $20 million. Davies was commonly assumed to be the inspiration for the Susan Alexander character portrayed in Orson Welles's Citizen Kane (1941), which was based loosely on Hearst's life. This led to various portrayals of Davies as a talentless opportunist. In his foreword to Davies' autobiography, The Times We Had (published posthumously in 1975), Welles wrote that his fictional creation bears no resemblance to Davies: That Susan was Kane's wife and Marion was Hearst's mistress is a difference more important than might be guessed in today's changed climate of opinion. The wife was a puppet and a prisoner; the mistress was never less than a princess. Hearst built more than one castle, and Marion was the hostess in all of them: they were pleasure domes indeed, and the Beautiful People of the day fought for invitations. Xanadu was a lonely fortress, and Susan was quite right to escape from it. The mistress was never one of Hearst's possessions: he was always her suitor, and she was the precious treasure of his heart for more than 30 years, until his last breath of life.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1951
    Age 54
    Eleven weeks and one day after Hearst's death, Davies married Horace Brown on October 31, 1951, in Las Vegas.
    More Details Hide Details It was not a happy marriage. Davies filed for divorce twice, but neither was finalized, despite Brown admitting he treated her badly: "I'm a beast," he said. "I took him back. I don't know why," she explained. "I guess because he's standing right beside me, crying. Thank God we all have a sense of humor."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1924
    Age 27
    In November 1924, Davies was among those aboard Hearst's luxury yacht Oneida for a weekend party that resulted in the death of film producer Thomas Ince.
    More Details Hide Details Rumors have endured since then that Davies had an alleged relationship with Chaplin, which led to Ince's accidental shooting by a jealous Hearst. Chaplin (among other actresses and actors) and Davies were aboard the yacht the night Ince died. There has never been any evidence to support the rumors. Ince's autopsy showed that he suffered an attack of acute indigestion while aboard the yacht and was escorted off to San Diego by another of the guests, Dr. Daniel Carson Goodman, a Hollywood writer and producer. Ince was put on a train bound for Los Angeles, but was removed from the train at Del Mar when his condition worsened. He was given medical attention by Dr. T. A. Parker and a nurse, Jesse Howard. Ince told them that he had drunk liquor aboard Hearst's yacht. He was taken to his Hollywood home where he died the following day of a heart condition.
  • 1920
    Age 23
    Lake claimed she was born in a Catholic hospital outside of Paris between 1920 and 1923 (she was unsure of the precise date).
    More Details Hide Details Lake was then given to Davies' sister Rose, whose own child had died in infancy, and passed off as Rose and her husband George Van Cleve's daughter. Lake stated that Hearst paid for her schooling and both Davies and Hearst spent considerable time with her. Davies reportedly told Lake of her true parentage when she was 11 years old. Lake said Hearst confirmed that he was her father on her wedding day at age 17 where both Davies and Hearst gave her away. Neither Davies nor Hearst ever publicly addressed the rumors during their lives. Upon news of the story, a spokesman for Hearst Castle only commented that, "It's a very old rumor and a rumor is all it ever was."
  • 1918
    Age 21
    Cecilia of the Pink Roses in 1918 was her first film backed by Hearst.
    More Details Hide Details She was on her way to being the most infamously advertised actress in the world. During the next ten years she appeared in 29 films, an average of almost three films a year. One of her most known roles was as Mary Tudor in When Knighthood Was in Flower (1922), directed by Robert G. Vignola, with whom she collaborated on several films. By the mid-1920s, however, Davies' career was often overshadowed by her relationship with William Randolph Hearst and their social life at San Simeon and Ocean House in Santa Monica; the latter dubbed by Colleen Moore "the biggest house on the beach – the beach between San Diego and Vancouver". According to her own audio diaries, she met Hearst long before she had started working in films. Hearst later formed Cosmopolitan Pictures, which would produce most of her starring vehicles. Hearst's relentless efforts to promote her career had a detrimental effect, but he persisted, making Cosmopolitan's distribution deals first with Paramount, then Goldwyn, and then Metro Goldwyn Mayer. Davies herself was more inclined to develop her comic talents alongside her friends at United Artists, but Hearst pointedly discouraged this. Davies, in her published memoirs The Times We Had, concluded that Hearst's over-the-top promotion of her career, in fact, had a negative result. Example: in 1929 Mr. Hearst purchased the Cameo Theatre, 934 Market Street, San Francisco. He then lavishly remodeled both the exterior and interior decor in a rosebud-hued Art Moderne motif, and renamed it The Marion Davies Theatre.
    In 1918, Hearst started the movie studio Cosmopolitan Productions to promote Davies' career and also moved her with her mother and sisters into an elegant Manhattan townhouse at the corner of Riverside Drive and W. 105th Street.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TEENAGE
  • 1916
    Age 19
    After making her screen debut in 1916, modelling gowns by Lady Duff-Gordon in a fashion newsreel, she appeared in her first feature film in the 1917 Runaway Romany.
    More Details Hide Details Davies wrote the film, which was directed by her brother-in-law, prominent Broadway producer George W. Lederer. The following year she starred in two films – The Burden of Proof and Cecilia of the Pink Roses. Playing mainly light comic roles, she quickly became a film personality appearing with major male stars, making a small fortune, which enabled her to provide financial assistance for her family and friends.
    Educated in a New York convent, Davies left school to pursue a career. She worked as a chorus girl in Broadway revues and modeled for illustrators Harrison Fisher and Howard Chandler Christy. In 1916, Davies was signed on as a Ziegfeld girl in the Ziegfeld Follies.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1897
    Age 0
    Davies was born Marion Cecilia Douras on January 3, 1897, in Brooklyn, the youngest of five children born to Bernard J. Douras (1857–1935), a lawyer and judge in New York City; and Rose Reilly (1867–1928).
    More Details Hide Details Her father performed the civil marriage of Gloria Gould Bishop. Her elder siblings included Rose, Reine, and Ethel. A brother, Charles, drowned at the age of 15 in 1906. His name was subsequently given to Davies' favorite nephew, screenwriter Charles Lederer, the son of Davies' sister Reine Davies. The Douras family lived near Prospect Park in Brooklyn. The sisters changed their surname to Davies, which one of them spotted on a real-estate agent's sign in the neighborhood. Even at a time when New York was the melting pot for new immigrants, having a British surname greatly helped one's prospects – the name Davies has Welsh origins.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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